Story & Photos by Robyn Scherer, M.Agr. | Ft. Collins, Colo.

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November 19, 2012
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Thankful for Agriculture


Each November, families gather together to celebrate Thanksgiving and to take time to remember what they are thankful for. Sometimes its easy for people to get caught up in what is not going right in their lives, and the frustrations that they have. However, giving thanks is a great way to remind people of what they have.

Agriculture is an area that many people feel blessed to work in, and there are many things to be thankful for. This is what those in Colorado agriculture are thankful for, and what they feel the outlook is for the industry.

Terry R. Fankhauser, Executive Vice President, Colorado Cattlemen’s Association

As one of the one percent involved in agriculture production, I am thankful for the values and ethics that beef production taught me. It was instilled early by my parents, relatives and neighbors, that doing things the correct way is more important than the outcome. While some might question this hypothesis, it is why you can list several fifth generation family ranches, but you struggle to name several fifth generation businesses outside of agriculture. I am most thankful though, for the opportunity to have my three children, through beef production, experience for themselves the many opportunities and responsibilities agriculture offers.

Brett Kaysen, Professor of Animal Science, Colorado State University

I am always thankful for the opportunity in ag that we have to be able to serve a global population. How many cool jobs do you get in ag, that you can say we feed the world? I am thankful that I am in a position where my two biggest passions, livestock and people, are able to be combined in an environment where I can help people move forward and better ag. I am thankful we have young people who want to make ag their profession. It’s great to see the young kids want a diploma, and to give back. Because the ag community as a whole is thrive, that will help drive this county out of a recession, and that is really positive. From an educators perspective, it’s as easy as it’s ever been to get ag kids hired in an economy where half of graduates don’t get a job.

Ryan Peterson, Herdsman, Leachman Cattle Company

I am thankful for the great people who dedicate their lives to the raising and care of our country’s livestock. They are the hardest working, most selfless people I know of. Its humbling to work among them and see the sacrifices they make for the betterment of their livestock. The future of our industry will greatly depend on our ability to use the technology that had been afforded to us to produce more food with less resources. Our practices will have to be transparent, and accepted by society on multiple levels to ensure sustainable production systems. I also believe American agriculture is embarking on one of the largest generational shifts in many years as baby boomers reach retirement, beckoning in a new era of young dynamic leaders to take our industry to the next level of food production.

Jessica Hawthorne, Director of Communications, Colorado Livestock Association

I am thankful for the diligence of those in agriculture across the nation. No matter the obstacle or hurdle they face, their passion for agriculture will not allow them to give up. I am thankful for the technological advances in agriculture that allow us to become more efficient. The future of agriculture is bright, fascinating and above all necessary. I believe that there are big changes on the horizon for the livestock industry and I am so thankful to be apart of it!

Theresa Bartlett, Logan County Fair Board Member

I am thankful for the people who are the backbone of this county. America’s Farmers and Ranchers. Yes, technology has come a long way from what it was, and has improved the industry dramatically. But if you plant a single piece of corn if taken care of correctly will create more corn. This concept hasn’t changed over time. There is no easy way to feed the entire country with urban sprawl rapidly growing, and farm ground becoming more and more expensive. We are feeding America with fewer and fewer acres everyday and still manage to feed a growing population. We as agricultural have to be thankful for what we have. We have to be thankful for the privilege to carry on traditions that have been passed down for hundreds of years. Because without agriculture the backbone of our country is gone, and there is no America. This country as a whole seems to take advantage of what American farmers provide us, and don’t really understand nor seem to care much about the industry until something goes wrong. I believe the future shines bright for American agriculture with new crop varieties being created everyday to improve yields, pest control and decrease water intake for the plant. As long as we still have farming communities that know how important agriculture is and pass down our way of life to generation to generation we have lots to be thankful for.

Megan Grieve, Associate Editor, “Dirt Road Daughters Magazine”

I’m especially thankful for my family! I think the future of the industry is bright. Our rugged individualistic style and passion for community throughout the industry will lead us through tough times and help us prosper regardless!

Jess Milstein, Collegiate Agricultural Ambassador

I am thankful for the food that I have on my table, the clothes that I am wearing and the people who are around me everyday. I am thankful that I don’t have to worry about how my food is raised or where my next meal is coming from. Truthfully the future of the ag industry is bright. There are so many new ways that we are improving, from healthier food to safer and more precise equipment. We are not just an industry, but a community and a family, where we support one another to give the consumer a choice. It is the reason that we are able to help feed other countries on top of ourselves and share our knowledge with countries who will listen. I am so happy to be involved in an industry that allows me to be the future and help educate those all around me. I am just thankful that I have the opportunity to give back and to be the change in our world and to have the ability to make a difference.

Marshall Frasier, Professor in Agricultural Business& Economics, Colorado State University

I feel most thankful for the people in the industry. Because I was blessed to be born into and raised in agriculture, I have been surrounded by the greatest concentration of hard working, principled and caring individuals that I could imagine. Because I continue to see this in the vast majority of students that our programs of study attract, I have nothing but a tremendously positive outlook for the future of the industry. I truly believe that we will all be in good hands in the future!

Megan Semler, Student

I am thankful for the heritage and values found in agriculture. The upbringing that my parents were able to give me because we life bed on a farm is something that I cherish each day! I feel we are in a very changing industry and with all of the technology that is coming things will be changing so quickly. It is not just our job to provide food for the world but to do this in a responsible manner. A manner in which we are sustainable stewards of the land and provide care to the animals in which we depend.

Mara Stojic, Sales Rep. at Longmont Dairy

I’m appreciative of a job in the agriculture industry. I love sampling milk/juices and teaching people about the dairy world each and everyday. I enjoy driving the milk truck ... reminds me of how milk and other things got to be delivered. I think the future for agriculture is bright! There are tons of new technologies are being implemented ... which I think will make agriculture grow even more! ❖




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The Fence Post Updated Nov 19, 2012 04:10AM Published Nov 27, 2012 06:12AM Copyright 2012 The Fence Post. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.