Margaret Melloy Guziak
Grand Junction, Colo.

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June 13, 2011
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The View Hotel in Monument Valley


John Wayne never saw the View Hotel; it was constructed many years after his death. But, if he had seen it, he would have been impressed. It overlooks the open trails and the fantastic desert scenery on which Duke and his fellow actors made films in this special place that introduced the ultimate, pristine beauty of this area to the entire world. There is a rock ledge formation that was named "John Ford's Point" after the famous director who cherished that particular spot and captured it in many of his movies.

The View Hotel is the only hotel ever built on the Navajo reservation in an area called Monument Valley Navajo Nation Park. After ceremonies and traditional blessings, this spectacular $14 million dollar hotel was open to guests on January 14, 2009. It boasts 95 rooms, all with private balconies facing east where one can experience the unspoken drama of a morning sunrise. In addition, this hotel has a fitness center from which you can observe the setting sun. The large lobby is filled with handsome furniture, a towering rock fireplace and a larger-than-life bronze of a cowboy astride his horse. There are three conference rooms and a restaurant with views to the east and the west.

Outside there is a multi-level balcony with chairs and tables placed at strategic places for one to rest and try to capture with your own eyes the expanse of quiet beauty around and in front of you. An expansive gift shop off the balcony offers authentic Navajo jewelry, art, photographs, blankets and clothing as an added bonus.

This hotel was built by Armanda Ortega-Gordon, a young, 26-year-old Navajo woman of the Towering House Clan (Kiy' annii'), her mother's family. Her father, Armanda Ortega Jr., who joined with her in the project, is a non-Navajo whose family created and owns Trading Posts all throughout Arizona and New Mexico. Armanda Ortega-Gordon is the granddaughter of Armand Ortega Sr., the one who started his business by buying jewelry, art and authentic woven rugs from the Navajo (Dine) people for his clientele.

The project, building a hotel on Navajo land (Dineteh), that reflects the beauty, history and beliefs of the Dine, was a dream for over 40 years by the Navajo people. They wanted to create a thing of beauty, a place where their people could be employed, and that would showcase the culture of the Navajo nation in a respectful, natural way. Against many obstacles, discussions and negotiations, that is exactly what Armanda and her father have done. And now it is there for the whole world to see and appreciate.

We stopped there in the early afternoon on our way back from California this February. No matter how many times one sees Monument Valley, one never gets tired of its grandeur. We've been in the View Hotel twice, and although we've never had the pleasure of staying there overnight, it's at the top of my "Bucket List".

For more information on the View Hotel please call (435) 727-5555 or visit www.MonumentValleyView.com.

John Wayne never saw the View Hotel; it was constructed many years after his death. But, if he had seen it, he would have been impressed. It overlooks the open trails and the fantastic desert scenery on which Duke and his fellow actors made films in this special place that introduced the ultimate, pristine beauty of this area to the entire world. There is a rock ledge formation that was named "John Ford's Point" after the famous director who cherished that particular spot and captured it in many of his movies.

The View Hotel is the only hotel ever built on the Navajo reservation in an area called Monument Valley Navajo Nation Park. After ceremonies and traditional blessings, this spectacular $14 million dollar hotel was open to guests on January 14, 2009. It boasts 95 rooms, all with private balconies facing east where one can experience the unspoken drama of a morning sunrise. In addition, this hotel has a fitness center from which you can observe the setting sun. The large lobby is filled with handsome furniture, a towering rock fireplace and a larger-than-life bronze of a cowboy astride his horse. There are three conference rooms and a restaurant with views to the east and the west.

Outside there is a multi-level balcony with chairs and tables placed at strategic places for one to rest and try to capture with your own eyes the expanse of quiet beauty around and in front of you. An expansive gift shop off the balcony offers authentic Navajo jewelry, art, photographs, blankets and clothing as an added bonus.

This hotel was built by Armanda Ortega-Gordon, a young, 26-year-old Navajo woman of the Towering House Clan (Kiy' annii'), her mother's family. Her father, Armanda Ortega Jr., who joined with her in the project, is a non-Navajo whose family created and owns Trading Posts all throughout Arizona and New Mexico. Armanda Ortega-Gordon is the granddaughter of Armand Ortega Sr., the one who started his business by buying jewelry, art and authentic woven rugs from the Navajo (Dine) people for his clientele.

The project, building a hotel on Navajo land (Dineteh), that reflects the beauty, history and beliefs of the Dine, was a dream for over 40 years by the Navajo people. They wanted to create a thing of beauty, a place where their people could be employed, and that would showcase the culture of the Navajo nation in a respectful, natural way. Against many obstacles, discussions and negotiations, that is exactly what Armanda and her father have done. And now it is there for the whole world to see and appreciate.

We stopped there in the early afternoon on our way back from California this February. No matter how many times one sees Monument Valley, one never gets tired of its grandeur. We've been in the View Hotel twice, and although we've never had the pleasure of staying there overnight, it's at the top of my "Bucket List".

For more information on the View Hotel please call (435) 727-5555 or visit www.MonumentValleyView.com.

John Wayne never saw the View Hotel; it was constructed many years after his death. But, if he had seen it, he would have been impressed. It overlooks the open trails and the fantastic desert scenery on which Duke and his fellow actors made films in this special place that introduced the ultimate, pristine beauty of this area to the entire world. There is a rock ledge formation that was named "John Ford's Point" after the famous director who cherished that particular spot and captured it in many of his movies.

The View Hotel is the only hotel ever built on the Navajo reservation in an area called Monument Valley Navajo Nation Park. After ceremonies and traditional blessings, this spectacular $14 million dollar hotel was open to guests on January 14, 2009. It boasts 95 rooms, all with private balconies facing east where one can experience the unspoken drama of a morning sunrise. In addition, this hotel has a fitness center from which you can observe the setting sun. The large lobby is filled with handsome furniture, a towering rock fireplace and a larger-than-life bronze of a cowboy astride his horse. There are three conference rooms and a restaurant with views to the east and the west.

Outside there is a multi-level balcony with chairs and tables placed at strategic places for one to rest and try to capture with your own eyes the expanse of quiet beauty around and in front of you. An expansive gift shop off the balcony offers authentic Navajo jewelry, art, photographs, blankets and clothing as an added bonus.

This hotel was built by Armanda Ortega-Gordon, a young, 26-year-old Navajo woman of the Towering House Clan (Kiy' annii'), her mother's family. Her father, Armanda Ortega Jr., who joined with her in the project, is a non-Navajo whose family created and owns Trading Posts all throughout Arizona and New Mexico. Armanda Ortega-Gordon is the granddaughter of Armand Ortega Sr., the one who started his business by buying jewelry, art and authentic woven rugs from the Navajo (Dine) people for his clientele.

The project, building a hotel on Navajo land (Dineteh), that reflects the beauty, history and beliefs of the Dine, was a dream for over 40 years by the Navajo people. They wanted to create a thing of beauty, a place where their people could be employed, and that would showcase the culture of the Navajo nation in a respectful, natural way. Against many obstacles, discussions and negotiations, that is exactly what Armanda and her father have done. And now it is there for the whole world to see and appreciate.

We stopped there in the early afternoon on our way back from California this February. No matter how many times one sees Monument Valley, one never gets tired of its grandeur. We've been in the View Hotel twice, and although we've never had the pleasure of staying there overnight, it's at the top of my "Bucket List".

For more information on the View Hotel please call (435) 727-5555 or visit www.MonumentValleyView.com.

John Wayne never saw the View Hotel; it was constructed many years after his death. But, if he had seen it, he would have been impressed. It overlooks the open trails and the fantastic desert scenery on which Duke and his fellow actors made films in this special place that introduced the ultimate, pristine beauty of this area to the entire world. There is a rock ledge formation that was named "John Ford's Point" after the famous director who cherished that particular spot and captured it in many of his movies.

The View Hotel is the only hotel ever built on the Navajo reservation in an area called Monument Valley Navajo Nation Park. After ceremonies and traditional blessings, this spectacular $14 million dollar hotel was open to guests on January 14, 2009. It boasts 95 rooms, all with private balconies facing east where one can experience the unspoken drama of a morning sunrise. In addition, this hotel has a fitness center from which you can observe the setting sun. The large lobby is filled with handsome furniture, a towering rock fireplace and a larger-than-life bronze of a cowboy astride his horse. There are three conference rooms and a restaurant with views to the east and the west.

Outside there is a multi-level balcony with chairs and tables placed at strategic places for one to rest and try to capture with your own eyes the expanse of quiet beauty around and in front of you. An expansive gift shop off the balcony offers authentic Navajo jewelry, art, photographs, blankets and clothing as an added bonus.

This hotel was built by Armanda Ortega-Gordon, a young, 26-year-old Navajo woman of the Towering House Clan (Kiy' annii'), her mother's family. Her father, Armanda Ortega Jr., who joined with her in the project, is a non-Navajo whose family created and owns Trading Posts all throughout Arizona and New Mexico. Armanda Ortega-Gordon is the granddaughter of Armand Ortega Sr., the one who started his business by buying jewelry, art and authentic woven rugs from the Navajo (Dine) people for his clientele.

The project, building a hotel on Navajo land (Dineteh), that reflects the beauty, history and beliefs of the Dine, was a dream for over 40 years by the Navajo people. They wanted to create a thing of beauty, a place where their people could be employed, and that would showcase the culture of the Navajo nation in a respectful, natural way. Against many obstacles, discussions and negotiations, that is exactly what Armanda and her father have done. And now it is there for the whole world to see and appreciate.

We stopped there in the early afternoon on our way back from California this February. No matter how many times one sees Monument Valley, one never gets tired of its grandeur. We've been in the View Hotel twice, and although we've never had the pleasure of staying there overnight, it's at the top of my "Bucket List".

For more information on the View Hotel please call (435) 727-5555 or visit www.MonumentValleyView.com.

John Wayne never saw the View Hotel; it was constructed many years after his death. But, if he had seen it, he would have been impressed. It overlooks the open trails and the fantastic desert scenery on which Duke and his fellow actors made films in this special place that introduced the ultimate, pristine beauty of this area to the entire world. There is a rock ledge formation that was named "John Ford's Point" after the famous director who cherished that particular spot and captured it in many of his movies.

The View Hotel is the only hotel ever built on the Navajo reservation in an area called Monument Valley Navajo Nation Park. After ceremonies and traditional blessings, this spectacular $14 million dollar hotel was open to guests on January 14, 2009. It boasts 95 rooms, all with private balconies facing east where one can experience the unspoken drama of a morning sunrise. In addition, this hotel has a fitness center from which you can observe the setting sun. The large lobby is filled with handsome furniture, a towering rock fireplace and a larger-than-life bronze of a cowboy astride his horse. There are three conference rooms and a restaurant with views to the east and the west.

Outside there is a multi-level balcony with chairs and tables placed at strategic places for one to rest and try to capture with your own eyes the expanse of quiet beauty around and in front of you. An expansive gift shop off the balcony offers authentic Navajo jewelry, art, photographs, blankets and clothing as an added bonus.

This hotel was built by Armanda Ortega-Gordon, a young, 26-year-old Navajo woman of the Towering House Clan (Kiy' annii'), her mother's family. Her father, Armanda Ortega Jr., who joined with her in the project, is a non-Navajo whose family created and owns Trading Posts all throughout Arizona and New Mexico. Armanda Ortega-Gordon is the granddaughter of Armand Ortega Sr., the one who started his business by buying jewelry, art and authentic woven rugs from the Navajo (Dine) people for his clientele.

The project, building a hotel on Navajo land (Dineteh), that reflects the beauty, history and beliefs of the Dine, was a dream for over 40 years by the Navajo people. They wanted to create a thing of beauty, a place where their people could be employed, and that would showcase the culture of the Navajo nation in a respectful, natural way. Against many obstacles, discussions and negotiations, that is exactly what Armanda and her father have done. And now it is there for the whole world to see and appreciate.

We stopped there in the early afternoon on our way back from California this February. No matter how many times one sees Monument Valley, one never gets tired of its grandeur. We've been in the View Hotel twice, and although we've never had the pleasure of staying there overnight, it's at the top of my "Bucket List".

For more information on the View Hotel please call (435) 727-5555 or visit www.MonumentValleyView.com.




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The Fence Post Updated Aug 14, 2012 04:35PM Published Jun 13, 2011 03:26PM Copyright 2011 The Fence Post. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.