Lincoln Rogers
Parker, Colo.

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October 4, 2011
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4-H Club Calves and Show Steers


If you have a destination, the first step needs to be in the right direction. That not only applies to travel, but also to the world of 4-H. For 4-H participants choosing cattle as a project, breeders and producers of "club calves" (also known as "show steers") believe they are that important right step in reaching a successful destination.

In the past, 4-H calves were likely selected from a family farm or a neighbor's herd. Present day competitions, however, feature a high percentage of steers and heifers specifically bred and raised for the purpose of showing, and they have a good chance of coming from producers who specialize in raising club calves instead of commercial cattle.

"Obviously there is a difference in end-point focus," explained Brad Fassett of Fassett Hay and Cattle in Durango, Colo., about club calves versus commercial cattle. "We're trying to put in basically the same traits that you need in good commercial cattle, but then have a little bit of show ring pizzazz with them. They need some extra balance and quality and eye appeal. And that's relative to just commercial cattle."

That show ring pizzazz was further explained by another smaller club calf producer in Colorado.

"The difference is the bone and the hair and the muscle these club calves have on them," said Jerry Riley of JDR Cattle in Franktown, Colo. "(For breeding purposes) I'm going after that hair, muscle and bone that it takes to be a club calf compared to just a pasture type calf."

"There is a lot more 'show look' to these club calves," agreed commercial cattle producer Mark Beauprez of Beauprez Cattle in Byers, Colo. While he doesn't specialize in breeding club calves, Beauprez has sold a few calves for 4-H projects and shared his cattleman observations. "The lines are a lot straighter and you got a lot more muscle in them. They're a lot more prettier fronted, bigger boned, a lot thicker animal."

With show cattle requiring a better "look" in the ring compared to their commercial counterparts, club calf producers spend significant time finding genetics to help a 4-H participant succeed.

"These genetics are pretty specific," said Fassett about breeding for showing instead of only for beef production. "We spend a lot of time on genetic selection and trying to make cattle that are going to be competitive in the show ring. There is a fair amount of difference. You've got a lot better chance of being competitive when you come (to a club calf producer) and get cattle that are bred specifically for this purpose."

"You want that complete package," offered Riley. "There is always something wrong with every animal, but you want the hair and the pretty and the muscle, and you want them to be able to travel and cover their step and walk right. (The Judges) are looking for the complete package."

On top of different genetics from commercial cattle, the sale is also not the end of the equation for the specialized club calf producer. Not only will 4-H participants buy a calf that is likely already halter broke and experienced with bathing and clipping; they also get a knowledgeable partner in their journey to the show ring.

"Mine are usually all halter broke, they've all been washed, they've all been clipped (and) they are all started on grain," said Riley regarding the service side of producing club calves. "I keep in contact with (buyers) and if they need help, I'll go and help them. If they need somebody to clip for them, I can clip for them or answer their questions or whatever," he added. "I've helped kids get started and got them lined out and showed them how to do it and what to feed. They can call me at any time."

"We put a lot of time into these (calves) beforehand," offered Fassett. "And then they're weaned, they're straightened out, they will basically be halter broke and they are ready to go. We try and provide as much service after the sale as we can. Any kind of problems they are having or any concerns as far as getting them fed right and getting them taken care of right so they can be competitive, we'll take them clear through to whatever their end-point is, their county or state fair or whatever," he continued. "For us to be successful, we have to have cattle that are successful."

Whether it is club calf or commercial cattle producers, they all agree on 4-H's importance to our agricultural community.

"4-H treated me awful good when I was a kid," revealed Fassett. "It provided a number of opportunities that kind of got me through college and I met a bunch of lifelong friends and good networking deals and so forth. Part of it is that we are trying to give back a little bit. There's nothing cooler than seeing ... a kid work hard and see how tickled (they are) to be competitive and have a really successful year."

"It's super," said Riley about 4-H. "There are a lot of kids that get into 4-H that have no idea what they are doing and you can just see them develop over the years. It really changes those kids around and changes their attitude. I think 4-H is one of the best things out there for kids to be able to do."

"4-H is very important," summed up Beauprez. "It's the next generation coming up that might go into the agriculture side of it and that's how they learn to keep it going. It's another generation you hope is going to catch on and keep going with it, because it is getting fewer and farther between."

For more information please contact the following:

• Fassett Hay and Cattle in Durango, Colo., (970) 759-5430 or www.FassettHaynCattle.com. They sell club calves through both auction and private treaty.

• JDR Cattle in Franktown, Colo., (303) 809-8342 or www.ShowSteers.com/JDR/index2.html. They sell club calves through private treaty.

If you have a destination, the first step needs to be in the right direction. That not only applies to travel, but also to the world of 4-H. For 4-H participants choosing cattle as a project, breeders and producers of "club calves" (also known as "show steers") believe they are that important right step in reaching a successful destination.

In the past, 4-H calves were likely selected from a family farm or a neighbor's herd. Present day competitions, however, feature a high percentage of steers and heifers specifically bred and raised for the purpose of showing, and they have a good chance of coming from producers who specialize in raising club calves instead of commercial cattle.

"Obviously there is a difference in end-point focus," explained Brad Fassett of Fassett Hay and Cattle in Durango, Colo., about club calves versus commercial cattle. "We're trying to put in basically the same traits that you need in good commercial cattle, but then have a little bit of show ring pizzazz with them. They need some extra balance and quality and eye appeal. And that's relative to just commercial cattle."

That show ring pizzazz was further explained by another smaller club calf producer in Colorado.

"The difference is the bone and the hair and the muscle these club calves have on them," said Jerry Riley of JDR Cattle in Franktown, Colo. "(For breeding purposes) I'm going after that hair, muscle and bone that it takes to be a club calf compared to just a pasture type calf."

"There is a lot more 'show look' to these club calves," agreed commercial cattle producer Mark Beauprez of Beauprez Cattle in Byers, Colo. While he doesn't specialize in breeding club calves, Beauprez has sold a few calves for 4-H projects and shared his cattleman observations. "The lines are a lot straighter and you got a lot more muscle in them. They're a lot more prettier fronted, bigger boned, a lot thicker animal."

With show cattle requiring a better "look" in the ring compared to their commercial counterparts, club calf producers spend significant time finding genetics to help a 4-H participant succeed.

"These genetics are pretty specific," said Fassett about breeding for showing instead of only for beef production. "We spend a lot of time on genetic selection and trying to make cattle that are going to be competitive in the show ring. There is a fair amount of difference. You've got a lot better chance of being competitive when you come (to a club calf producer) and get cattle that are bred specifically for this purpose."

"You want that complete package," offered Riley. "There is always something wrong with every animal, but you want the hair and the pretty and the muscle, and you want them to be able to travel and cover their step and walk right. (The Judges) are looking for the complete package."

On top of different genetics from commercial cattle, the sale is also not the end of the equation for the specialized club calf producer. Not only will 4-H participants buy a calf that is likely already halter broke and experienced with bathing and clipping; they also get a knowledgeable partner in their journey to the show ring.

"Mine are usually all halter broke, they've all been washed, they've all been clipped (and) they are all started on grain," said Riley regarding the service side of producing club calves. "I keep in contact with (buyers) and if they need help, I'll go and help them. If they need somebody to clip for them, I can clip for them or answer their questions or whatever," he added. "I've helped kids get started and got them lined out and showed them how to do it and what to feed. They can call me at any time."

"We put a lot of time into these (calves) beforehand," offered Fassett. "And then they're weaned, they're straightened out, they will basically be halter broke and they are ready to go. We try and provide as much service after the sale as we can. Any kind of problems they are having or any concerns as far as getting them fed right and getting them taken care of right so they can be competitive, we'll take them clear through to whatever their end-point is, their county or state fair or whatever," he continued. "For us to be successful, we have to have cattle that are successful."

Whether it is club calf or commercial cattle producers, they all agree on 4-H's importance to our agricultural community.

"4-H treated me awful good when I was a kid," revealed Fassett. "It provided a number of opportunities that kind of got me through college and I met a bunch of lifelong friends and good networking deals and so forth. Part of it is that we are trying to give back a little bit. There's nothing cooler than seeing ... a kid work hard and see how tickled (they are) to be competitive and have a really successful year."

"It's super," said Riley about 4-H. "There are a lot of kids that get into 4-H that have no idea what they are doing and you can just see them develop over the years. It really changes those kids around and changes their attitude. I think 4-H is one of the best things out there for kids to be able to do."

"4-H is very important," summed up Beauprez. "It's the next generation coming up that might go into the agriculture side of it and that's how they learn to keep it going. It's another generation you hope is going to catch on and keep going with it, because it is getting fewer and farther between."

For more information please contact the following:

• Fassett Hay and Cattle in Durango, Colo., (970) 759-5430 or www.FassettHaynCattle.com. They sell club calves through both auction and private treaty.

• JDR Cattle in Franktown, Colo., (303) 809-8342 or www.ShowSteers.com/JDR/index2.html. They sell club calves through private treaty.

If you have a destination, the first step needs to be in the right direction. That not only applies to travel, but also to the world of 4-H. For 4-H participants choosing cattle as a project, breeders and producers of "club calves" (also known as "show steers") believe they are that important right step in reaching a successful destination.

In the past, 4-H calves were likely selected from a family farm or a neighbor's herd. Present day competitions, however, feature a high percentage of steers and heifers specifically bred and raised for the purpose of showing, and they have a good chance of coming from producers who specialize in raising club calves instead of commercial cattle.

"Obviously there is a difference in end-point focus," explained Brad Fassett of Fassett Hay and Cattle in Durango, Colo., about club calves versus commercial cattle. "We're trying to put in basically the same traits that you need in good commercial cattle, but then have a little bit of show ring pizzazz with them. They need some extra balance and quality and eye appeal. And that's relative to just commercial cattle."

That show ring pizzazz was further explained by another smaller club calf producer in Colorado.

"The difference is the bone and the hair and the muscle these club calves have on them," said Jerry Riley of JDR Cattle in Franktown, Colo. "(For breeding purposes) I'm going after that hair, muscle and bone that it takes to be a club calf compared to just a pasture type calf."

"There is a lot more 'show look' to these club calves," agreed commercial cattle producer Mark Beauprez of Beauprez Cattle in Byers, Colo. While he doesn't specialize in breeding club calves, Beauprez has sold a few calves for 4-H projects and shared his cattleman observations. "The lines are a lot straighter and you got a lot more muscle in them. They're a lot more prettier fronted, bigger boned, a lot thicker animal."

With show cattle requiring a better "look" in the ring compared to their commercial counterparts, club calf producers spend significant time finding genetics to help a 4-H participant succeed.

"These genetics are pretty specific," said Fassett about breeding for showing instead of only for beef production. "We spend a lot of time on genetic selection and trying to make cattle that are going to be competitive in the show ring. There is a fair amount of difference. You've got a lot better chance of being competitive when you come (to a club calf producer) and get cattle that are bred specifically for this purpose."

"You want that complete package," offered Riley. "There is always something wrong with every animal, but you want the hair and the pretty and the muscle, and you want them to be able to travel and cover their step and walk right. (The Judges) are looking for the complete package."

On top of different genetics from commercial cattle, the sale is also not the end of the equation for the specialized club calf producer. Not only will 4-H participants buy a calf that is likely already halter broke and experienced with bathing and clipping; they also get a knowledgeable partner in their journey to the show ring.

"Mine are usually all halter broke, they've all been washed, they've all been clipped (and) they are all started on grain," said Riley regarding the service side of producing club calves. "I keep in contact with (buyers) and if they need help, I'll go and help them. If they need somebody to clip for them, I can clip for them or answer their questions or whatever," he added. "I've helped kids get started and got them lined out and showed them how to do it and what to feed. They can call me at any time."

"We put a lot of time into these (calves) beforehand," offered Fassett. "And then they're weaned, they're straightened out, they will basically be halter broke and they are ready to go. We try and provide as much service after the sale as we can. Any kind of problems they are having or any concerns as far as getting them fed right and getting them taken care of right so they can be competitive, we'll take them clear through to whatever their end-point is, their county or state fair or whatever," he continued. "For us to be successful, we have to have cattle that are successful."

Whether it is club calf or commercial cattle producers, they all agree on 4-H's importance to our agricultural community.

"4-H treated me awful good when I was a kid," revealed Fassett. "It provided a number of opportunities that kind of got me through college and I met a bunch of lifelong friends and good networking deals and so forth. Part of it is that we are trying to give back a little bit. There's nothing cooler than seeing ... a kid work hard and see how tickled (they are) to be competitive and have a really successful year."

"It's super," said Riley about 4-H. "There are a lot of kids that get into 4-H that have no idea what they are doing and you can just see them develop over the years. It really changes those kids around and changes their attitude. I think 4-H is one of the best things out there for kids to be able to do."

"4-H is very important," summed up Beauprez. "It's the next generation coming up that might go into the agriculture side of it and that's how they learn to keep it going. It's another generation you hope is going to catch on and keep going with it, because it is getting fewer and farther between."

For more information please contact the following:

• Fassett Hay and Cattle in Durango, Colo., (970) 759-5430 or www.FassettHaynCattle.com. They sell club calves through both auction and private treaty.

• JDR Cattle in Franktown, Colo., (303) 809-8342 or www.ShowSteers.com/JDR/index2.html. They sell club calves through private treaty.

If you have a destination, the first step needs to be in the right direction. That not only applies to travel, but also to the world of 4-H. For 4-H participants choosing cattle as a project, breeders and producers of "club calves" (also known as "show steers") believe they are that important right step in reaching a successful destination.

In the past, 4-H calves were likely selected from a family farm or a neighbor's herd. Present day competitions, however, feature a high percentage of steers and heifers specifically bred and raised for the purpose of showing, and they have a good chance of coming from producers who specialize in raising club calves instead of commercial cattle.

"Obviously there is a difference in end-point focus," explained Brad Fassett of Fassett Hay and Cattle in Durango, Colo., about club calves versus commercial cattle. "We're trying to put in basically the same traits that you need in good commercial cattle, but then have a little bit of show ring pizzazz with them. They need some extra balance and quality and eye appeal. And that's relative to just commercial cattle."

That show ring pizzazz was further explained by another smaller club calf producer in Colorado.

"The difference is the bone and the hair and the muscle these club calves have on them," said Jerry Riley of JDR Cattle in Franktown, Colo. "(For breeding purposes) I'm going after that hair, muscle and bone that it takes to be a club calf compared to just a pasture type calf."

"There is a lot more 'show look' to these club calves," agreed commercial cattle producer Mark Beauprez of Beauprez Cattle in Byers, Colo. While he doesn't specialize in breeding club calves, Beauprez has sold a few calves for 4-H projects and shared his cattleman observations. "The lines are a lot straighter and you got a lot more muscle in them. They're a lot more prettier fronted, bigger boned, a lot thicker animal."

With show cattle requiring a better "look" in the ring compared to their commercial counterparts, club calf producers spend significant time finding genetics to help a 4-H participant succeed.

"These genetics are pretty specific," said Fassett about breeding for showing instead of only for beef production. "We spend a lot of time on genetic selection and trying to make cattle that are going to be competitive in the show ring. There is a fair amount of difference. You've got a lot better chance of being competitive when you come (to a club calf producer) and get cattle that are bred specifically for this purpose."

"You want that complete package," offered Riley. "There is always something wrong with every animal, but you want the hair and the pretty and the muscle, and you want them to be able to travel and cover their step and walk right. (The Judges) are looking for the complete package."

On top of different genetics from commercial cattle, the sale is also not the end of the equation for the specialized club calf producer. Not only will 4-H participants buy a calf that is likely already halter broke and experienced with bathing and clipping; they also get a knowledgeable partner in their journey to the show ring.

"Mine are usually all halter broke, they've all been washed, they've all been clipped (and) they are all started on grain," said Riley regarding the service side of producing club calves. "I keep in contact with (buyers) and if they need help, I'll go and help them. If they need somebody to clip for them, I can clip for them or answer their questions or whatever," he added. "I've helped kids get started and got them lined out and showed them how to do it and what to feed. They can call me at any time."

"We put a lot of time into these (calves) beforehand," offered Fassett. "And then they're weaned, they're straightened out, they will basically be halter broke and they are ready to go. We try and provide as much service after the sale as we can. Any kind of problems they are having or any concerns as far as getting them fed right and getting them taken care of right so they can be competitive, we'll take them clear through to whatever their end-point is, their county or state fair or whatever," he continued. "For us to be successful, we have to have cattle that are successful."

Whether it is club calf or commercial cattle producers, they all agree on 4-H's importance to our agricultural community.

"4-H treated me awful good when I was a kid," revealed Fassett. "It provided a number of opportunities that kind of got me through college and I met a bunch of lifelong friends and good networking deals and so forth. Part of it is that we are trying to give back a little bit. There's nothing cooler than seeing ... a kid work hard and see how tickled (they are) to be competitive and have a really successful year."

"It's super," said Riley about 4-H. "There are a lot of kids that get into 4-H that have no idea what they are doing and you can just see them develop over the years. It really changes those kids around and changes their attitude. I think 4-H is one of the best things out there for kids to be able to do."

"4-H is very important," summed up Beauprez. "It's the next generation coming up that might go into the agriculture side of it and that's how they learn to keep it going. It's another generation you hope is going to catch on and keep going with it, because it is getting fewer and farther between."

For more information please contact the following:

• Fassett Hay and Cattle in Durango, Colo., (970) 759-5430 or www.FassettHaynCattle.com. They sell club calves through both auction and private treaty.

• JDR Cattle in Franktown, Colo., (303) 809-8342 or www.ShowSteers.com/JDR/index2.html. They sell club calves through private treaty.




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The Fence Post Updated Aug 14, 2012 04:58PM Published Oct 4, 2011 05:34PM Copyright 2011 The Fence Post. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.