A seven-day horse: Wyoming couple aims to put together strong stable with Blanton stallions and mares | TheFencePost.com

A seven-day horse: Wyoming couple aims to put together strong stable with Blanton stallions and mares

Teresa Clark

It all started with one stallion. Wyoming Blanton Enterprises was established years ago when Stuart Hoar acquired his first Blanton horse, Wyoming Blanton, from Bob and Mary Hadley of Sundance, Wyo.

"Since that time, we have tried to put together the best bunch of stallions and mares that we could," Hoar said. "Our goal is to put a good-using horse on the ground that you can ride all week and still compete on at rodeos over the weekend. I think we have been pretty successful at that."

"This business is built around family, and putting God first," said Hoar of his and wife, Charity's company, Wyoming Blanton Enterprises of Pine Bluffs, Wyo. "He is the reason this has all been possible. This is a family and faith-built business. Our goal has been to provide people with the best product we can. It is what we have staked our reputations on."

The couple currently has two stallions, Skoal Bandit Blanton, and his offspring, Lucky Bandit.

"Skoal Bandit is going to be 21-years-old next spring," Hoar said. "We kept a son out of him, Hesa Lucky Bandit, who is a three-year-old. Lucky Bandit is out of the best daughter I have from my heading horse, Red Mark Blanton. I bred her to Skoal Bandit to get this stallion. We are very excited about him. I just started riding him this year, and he already shows so much promise."

In addition to being the future of Wyoming Blanton Enterprises, Hoar also hopes to finish him as an elite roping horse. "We like to compete in rodeo," he said, "especially team roping and calf roping. I used to compete in reining and reined cowhorse, and I still start all our colts that way. I think it puts a good foundation and handle on them."

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Hoar says they keep their horse operation on the smaller side, so its easier to manage.

"We bred nine mares this spring," he said, "but we have about 40 head of horses here of various ages and in different stages of training."

Most of the mares are Lucky Blanton, Driftwood or Poco Bueno bred. They also have a few Paint mares that are solid-colored breeding stock.

"All of the mares have foundation bloodlines and most of them we raised ourselves. There are a couple that we raised here, sold and have bought them back," he said.

Selecting the right horses for the business is an important part of what has made the business so successful.

"The biggest thing we select for is soundness," Hoar said. "We want horses that are sound and stay sound until they are 20 or more years old. Skoal Bandit is 20 years old and just two years ago, we went to over 50 rodeos that were everything from amateur to the circuit pro rodeo in the Mountain States. We took him to the circuit finals in 2013. At 20, he is still as sound as he was when he was five or six."

The Blanton horses also have good feet and bone structure, Hoar said.

"Soundness is a critical part of our program. We also need horses with a good mind. These horses are trainable and very willing. They don't want to buck, they just want to please you and they want to learn," he said.

Conformation and substance are also important.

"Skoal Bandit is about 14.3 hands and weighs about 1,200 pounds. We have a daughter from him that Charity uses for breakaway roping, barrels, heading and heeling. This mare is 15.1 hands and probably weighs close to 1,300 pounds. She is a stout, heavy-made mare and a superior athlete. That is the kind of horses we like," he said.

Hoar starts and trains all the colts.

"Our training methods are different from some people," he explained. "I don't like the colts to be pets when I go to ride them. I like them to be a little jumpy, which makes them more responsive. We halter break them when they are babies, but then we turn them out and just let them enjoy being a horse."

He doesn't start the colts until they are three-year-olds.

"I personally don't like to ride two-year-olds because they are immature and small, and you can't ride them a lot," he said. "When they are three, you can go out and ride them all day, and you aren't going to hurt them. We may start them later than some people, but I feel like you can get more done on them by waiting until they are more mature before you train them."

The Hoars market the horses via private treaty.

"We have horses for sale that are from three to eight-years-old. A lot of them are mares because they are a little harder to sell," Hoar said. "Some people have a misconception about mares, but personally I would rather ride a mare or a stallion than most geldings. They seem to have a little more to give, and aren't quite as lazy."

The couple also takes in a few outside horses for training, and some outside mares for live cover to Skoal Bandit.

As they continue to fine-tune the horse operation, the couple has big plans for the future.

"We would like to finish some of these young horses, and sell them to a high-end client that will take them down the road and rodeo with them," Hoar said. "These horses have the talent and the speed to do that. They also have the disposition and mindset. We want to put the time into them to take them further, and market them to high-end team ropers, calf ropers and barrel racers. We are looking for the folks that do it every day and every weekend. That is the market we want to get into.

"I roped calves on Skoal Bandit at the Mountain States Circuit Finals in 2013," Hoar said. "I also won the U.S. Calf Roping Championships on him when he was 8 years old in 2002. At the Black Hills Stock Show in 2002, he won the Ranch Horse Competition, and was second in the first Super Stallion Competition they had. Red Mark Blanton won it, and I showed, trained and rode them both. Looking at the NFR and the top ropers, they have been riding Lucky Blanton and Driftwood horses for multiple years. These horses are competing right up there with the best of them." ❖

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