First-ever Wyoming Horse Expo big draw for horse enthusiasts | TheFencePost.com

First-ever Wyoming Horse Expo big draw for horse enthusiasts

Gayle Smith
Gering, Neb.

Gayle SmithDusdee Shepperson demonstrates Electro-Acuscope and Myopulse Microcurrent Therapy to the audience.

Despite typical windy, cold spring weather in Wyoming, horse enthusiasts from throughout the state and its neighboring areas turned out in big numbers for the first-ever Big Wyoming Horse Expo in Douglas, Wyo.

“We thought we had a real good turnout for the event,” said Sam Hales, who was one of the organizers of the event. “We had someone do a walk-through on Saturday and they counted over 500 people there at one point. On Sunday, we think the weather slowed the traffic down some, but there was still a steady stream of people there all day.”

Hales said the group is excited to start planning for next year’s event. “We hope to make next year’s event even better,” he said. “The hard part was getting the first one started. We will have 12 months to plan for the next one, instead of just four months.”

The first-ever event was quite the learning atmosphere for horse enthusiasts of all disciplines. The event offered something for everyone. With three arenas of clinicians and speakers running inside the building at all times, additional clinicians provided demonstrations and clinics outside also, as weather permitted.

Clinicians demonstrated several disciplines of riding from jumping, barrel racing, trail and performance horse to working cow or ranch horse cutting. Meanwhile, other clinicians gave demonstrations on various methods of starting colts, and techniques to help riders improve their riding skills.

In the round corral, various speakers from across the state donated their time to show people everything from horse chiropractic and massage to trimming a horse’s feet to the benefits of using Electro-Acuscope/ Myopulse Micro-Current Therapy, which is used to speed healing of the horse.

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Dr. George Marble was also available during the Horse Expo to teach horse owners about the importance of regular dental treatments for their horse. On Sunday, he gave a presentation on colic, showing the audience how to detect the signs of the illness, and provide treatment options.

One of the main draws of the Horse Expo, was the opportunity for horsemen to receive some one-on-one attention free of charge. During a segment by NJ Pawley on horsemanship for the trail/pleasure horse, three girls with horses of different skill levels worked with Pawley in the arena. Taylor was riding a started horse and was interested in finding ways she could improve her horsemanship to make her horse perform better. Ryan was there to get some assistance for her horse, who she felt was lazy in the arena, and Alexis was riding a started mare. All three girls walked away with some new techniques and knowledge by the end of the two-hour session Pawley presented.

Later that afternoon as Bruce Laird taught a group of students about building a ranch/versatility horse, one girl waited patiently outside the arena on her colorful Appaloosa. She was hoping to get into the segment for some help from Laird, but was told the clinic was full. Later, she was invited to participate for some one-on-one training, which she was grateful for.

Horse farrier Robert Fowler presented a demonstration in the round corral on preparing a horse for the farrier. Watching his unusual technique astonished the audience who repeatedly told the farrier they had never seen anyone use that method of trimming feet before. The audience was surprised Fowler was able to take a “problem horse” that was in heat, and calm and relax her to the point he could work with her to trim her feet, while a stallion parade was taking place in the next arena. In addition to obtaining some new clients, Fowler left the crowd with some new knowledge of how to make hoof trimming an enjoyable experience for their horses.

During the two-day event, horse owners from all over brought in stallions, and horses they were offering for sale for a Stallion Parade and private treaty horse sale. During the event, an announcer talked about the breeding programs of several horse operations throughout the state as the horse owners showed off their stallions, mares and offspring. Other horse owners also had the opportunity to have the announcer tell about the horses they were offering for sale private treaty, while the owners were able to demonstrate in the arena what the horse could do.

Both days, performances were also made by the Chinook Winds Drill Team, which has been the opening act at the Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo for the last 28 years, and has performed at Cheyenne Frontier Days. The audience was treated with the opportunity to watch the ladies perform and see first-hand what teamwork and great horsemanship skills can accomplish.

When spectators tired of watching the demonstrations, they were also able to wander through nearly 50 displays in the vendor areas with everything from information on the various breed associations, groups and clubs to horse feed, supplements, clothing and crafts, to new horse trailers.

The Big Wyoming Horse Expo was free to the public and for those who attended, no one walked away empty-handed. For those there to learn, the event offered a never-ending learning atmosphere that can be obtained at

few events.

Despite typical windy, cold spring weather in Wyoming, horse enthusiasts from throughout the state and its neighboring areas turned out in big numbers for the first-ever Big Wyoming Horse Expo in Douglas, Wyo.

“We thought we had a real good turnout for the event,” said Sam Hales, who was one of the organizers of the event. “We had someone do a walk-through on Saturday and they counted over 500 people there at one point. On Sunday, we think the weather slowed the traffic down some, but there was still a steady stream of people there all day.”

Hales said the group is excited to start planning for next year’s event. “We hope to make next year’s event even better,” he said. “The hard part was getting the first one started. We will have 12 months to plan for the next one, instead of just four months.”

The first-ever event was quite the learning atmosphere for horse enthusiasts of all disciplines. The event offered something for everyone. With three arenas of clinicians and speakers running inside the building at all times, additional clinicians provided demonstrations and clinics outside also, as weather permitted.

Clinicians demonstrated several disciplines of riding from jumping, barrel racing, trail and performance horse to working cow or ranch horse cutting. Meanwhile, other clinicians gave demonstrations on various methods of starting colts, and techniques to help riders improve their riding skills.

In the round corral, various speakers from across the state donated their time to show people everything from horse chiropractic and massage to trimming a horse’s feet to the benefits of using Electro-Acuscope/ Myopulse Micro-Current Therapy, which is used to speed healing of the horse.

Dr. George Marble was also available during the Horse Expo to teach horse owners about the importance of regular dental treatments for their horse. On Sunday, he gave a presentation on colic, showing the audience how to detect the signs of the illness, and provide treatment options.

One of the main draws of the Horse Expo, was the opportunity for horsemen to receive some one-on-one attention free of charge. During a segment by NJ Pawley on horsemanship for the trail/pleasure horse, three girls with horses of different skill levels worked with Pawley in the arena. Taylor was riding a started horse and was interested in finding ways she could improve her horsemanship to make her horse perform better. Ryan was there to get some assistance for her horse, who she felt was lazy in the arena, and Alexis was riding a started mare. All three girls walked away with some new techniques and knowledge by the end of the two-hour session Pawley presented.

Later that afternoon as Bruce Laird taught a group of students about building a ranch/versatility horse, one girl waited patiently outside the arena on her colorful Appaloosa. She was hoping to get into the segment for some help from Laird, but was told the clinic was full. Later, she was invited to participate for some one-on-one training, which she was grateful for.

Horse farrier Robert Fowler presented a demonstration in the round corral on preparing a horse for the farrier. Watching his unusual technique astonished the audience who repeatedly told the farrier they had never seen anyone use that method of trimming feet before. The audience was surprised Fowler was able to take a “problem horse” that was in heat, and calm and relax her to the point he could work with her to trim her feet, while a stallion parade was taking place in the next arena. In addition to obtaining some new clients, Fowler left the crowd with some new knowledge of how to make hoof trimming an enjoyable experience for their horses.

During the two-day event, horse owners from all over brought in stallions, and horses they were offering for sale for a Stallion Parade and private treaty horse sale. During the event, an announcer talked about the breeding programs of several horse operations throughout the state as the horse owners showed off their stallions, mares and offspring. Other horse owners also had the opportunity to have the announcer tell about the horses they were offering for sale private treaty, while the owners were able to demonstrate in the arena what the horse could do.

Both days, performances were also made by the Chinook Winds Drill Team, which has been the opening act at the Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo for the last 28 years, and has performed at Cheyenne Frontier Days. The audience was treated with the opportunity to watch the ladies perform and see first-hand what teamwork and great horsemanship skills can accomplish.

When spectators tired of watching the demonstrations, they were also able to wander through nearly 50 displays in the vendor areas with everything from information on the various breed associations, groups and clubs to horse feed, supplements, clothing and crafts, to new horse trailers.

The Big Wyoming Horse Expo was free to the public and for those who attended, no one walked away empty-handed. For those there to learn, the event offered a never-ending learning atmosphere that can be obtained at

few events.

Despite typical windy, cold spring weather in Wyoming, horse enthusiasts from throughout the state and its neighboring areas turned out in big numbers for the first-ever Big Wyoming Horse Expo in Douglas, Wyo.

“We thought we had a real good turnout for the event,” said Sam Hales, who was one of the organizers of the event. “We had someone do a walk-through on Saturday and they counted over 500 people there at one point. On Sunday, we think the weather slowed the traffic down some, but there was still a steady stream of people there all day.”

Hales said the group is excited to start planning for next year’s event. “We hope to make next year’s event even better,” he said. “The hard part was getting the first one started. We will have 12 months to plan for the next one, instead of just four months.”

The first-ever event was quite the learning atmosphere for horse enthusiasts of all disciplines. The event offered something for everyone. With three arenas of clinicians and speakers running inside the building at all times, additional clinicians provided demonstrations and clinics outside also, as weather permitted.

Clinicians demonstrated several disciplines of riding from jumping, barrel racing, trail and performance horse to working cow or ranch horse cutting. Meanwhile, other clinicians gave demonstrations on various methods of starting colts, and techniques to help riders improve their riding skills.

In the round corral, various speakers from across the state donated their time to show people everything from horse chiropractic and massage to trimming a horse’s feet to the benefits of using Electro-Acuscope/ Myopulse Micro-Current Therapy, which is used to speed healing of the horse.

Dr. George Marble was also available during the Horse Expo to teach horse owners about the importance of regular dental treatments for their horse. On Sunday, he gave a presentation on colic, showing the audience how to detect the signs of the illness, and provide treatment options.

One of the main draws of the Horse Expo, was the opportunity for horsemen to receive some one-on-one attention free of charge. During a segment by NJ Pawley on horsemanship for the trail/pleasure horse, three girls with horses of different skill levels worked with Pawley in the arena. Taylor was riding a started horse and was interested in finding ways she could improve her horsemanship to make her horse perform better. Ryan was there to get some assistance for her horse, who she felt was lazy in the arena, and Alexis was riding a started mare. All three girls walked away with some new techniques and knowledge by the end of the two-hour session Pawley presented.

Later that afternoon as Bruce Laird taught a group of students about building a ranch/versatility horse, one girl waited patiently outside the arena on her colorful Appaloosa. She was hoping to get into the segment for some help from Laird, but was told the clinic was full. Later, she was invited to participate for some one-on-one training, which she was grateful for.

Horse farrier Robert Fowler presented a demonstration in the round corral on preparing a horse for the farrier. Watching his unusual technique astonished the audience who repeatedly told the farrier they had never seen anyone use that method of trimming feet before. The audience was surprised Fowler was able to take a “problem horse” that was in heat, and calm and relax her to the point he could work with her to trim her feet, while a stallion parade was taking place in the next arena. In addition to obtaining some new clients, Fowler left the crowd with some new knowledge of how to make hoof trimming an enjoyable experience for their horses.

During the two-day event, horse owners from all over brought in stallions, and horses they were offering for sale for a Stallion Parade and private treaty horse sale. During the event, an announcer talked about the breeding programs of several horse operations throughout the state as the horse owners showed off their stallions, mares and offspring. Other horse owners also had the opportunity to have the announcer tell about the horses they were offering for sale private treaty, while the owners were able to demonstrate in the arena what the horse could do.

Both days, performances were also made by the Chinook Winds Drill Team, which has been the opening act at the Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo for the last 28 years, and has performed at Cheyenne Frontier Days. The audience was treated with the opportunity to watch the ladies perform and see first-hand what teamwork and great horsemanship skills can accomplish.

When spectators tired of watching the demonstrations, they were also able to wander through nearly 50 displays in the vendor areas with everything from information on the various breed associations, groups and clubs to horse feed, supplements, clothing and crafts, to new horse trailers.

The Big Wyoming Horse Expo was free to the public and for those who attended, no one walked away empty-handed. For those there to learn, the event offered a never-ending learning atmosphere that can be obtained at

few events.

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