Hanks: Tough folks get the job done | TheFencePost.com

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Hanks: Tough folks get the job done

Gentle readers, to say it was "cold last night" would not be understated.

When I went down to feed early this morning it was 21 below. BURRRRR, that's cold, I don't care where you live.

However, I'm sure it was colder somewhere else. One of my coffee pards said the chill factor in Laramie, Wyo., was 54 below and I bet somewhere in Minnesota it was colder than that.

There are some of us that just have to be out in it 'cause we have things that have to be done. It wasn't always that way with me when I was a rep for Proctor and Gamble or when I worked for Sears.

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I have mentioned before about driving through the Texas panhandle in my P&G company car and in my suit and tie when I focused on a cowboy who had some steers pushed up in a fence corner to check them over.

It was cold and rainy and for sure a miserable day. His mustache had icicles in it and his face was raw and red but he had a job to do.

I wanted to trade places with him and be that cowboy on a horse checking cattle, regardless of the weather. I'm pretty sure at that moment he would have been glad to trade. Time marches on and I became that cowboy and never regretted one moment of it.

We got a good snow here at the ONO yesterday and I needed to shove it this way and that way on my tractor so I could get around my place and get things done.

It was 1 degree when I went out yesterday morning to fire up ol' Alice, my tractor, the one without the cab, that one. The only one I have.

It took about 20 minutes to get it going and keep running. I had so many clothes on it was all I could do to get on the cotton pickin' thing. An hour later the three-point comes undone on one side and my blade on the back dropped to the ground on one side when I had it raised.

No big deal other than it was going to require a Handy Man Jack and some muscle. I had the jack but not the muscle.

An hour later I gave up and called my friend "Animal." Animal has muscle. Just before he arrived I did get it put back together and told him not to come on over.

Another hour passed and I purty near had all I could take of moving snow for one day. I got enough done to be able to get around.

One on my grandsons works for a snow removal company and he spent seven, count them seven, hours moving snow with a shovel. And I thought I had it tough.

It's my honest opinion that folks that have to be out doing physical labor on days like that can do just about anything that requires hard work and a strong constitution. Having a strong back doesn't hurt either and mine just ain't that strong anymore.

I feel for those linesmen who have to be up on utility poles in a raging storm so you and I can have lights and heat. Good on you guys and gals! There are, as I write, some folks hauling hay on a sled with a team of horses up in the high country feeding their cows.

Tough folks they are. They do it that way sometimes out of necessity and sometimes just because they prefer to feed that way.

They are far tougher than I ever was or will be. I did spend one winter feeding small squares in the mountains and it took about four hours to load, feed, reload and feed again. Many times it would be 10 to 15 below. The back of that old truck was COLD!

Today, I will stay in by the fire other than to feed again and check the water for the ponies. The weather girl says 50 degrees in about three days. I love that girl!

Stay tuned, stay warm, throw an extra dog on the bed if necessary and love on your kids at every opportunity. I'll c. y'all, all y'all.

As a sidebar, the National Western Stock Show is in progress and it's a great place to spend a cold winter's day.❖