Mr. Truck 5-24-10 | TheFencePost.com

Mr. Truck 5-24-10

Kent Sundling
Denver, Colo.

A man and his machine, Joe Jamieson, the Henry Ford of trailer safety. An aeronautical engineer, well known in the world of aircraft, Joe is a problem solver. He hauls his horses in trailers like the rest of us, but with a twist. Joe thinks towing is an evolutionary process and should improve issues of safety and ease of use. Now with thousands of miles towing with the automated safety hitch, I understand it’s importance and fun. I can take my rig, which at times is 72 feet long, weave in and out of hotel parking lots, small gas stations and switchback mountain roads.

It looks complicated until you understand it. The four features that stand out the most using this new trailer technology are: improved braking, lane-to-lane direction changes, staying in your lane (turning corners), stability and jackknifing with purpose.

The automated safety hitch attaches to a three-point Class V receiver hitch on your vehicle. The connection can articulate vertically for uneven ground or railroad crossings providing an independent suspension. But horizontal movement is solid giving you the safety and stability of a 9 foot longer wheelbase. A longer wheelbase is a known factor for safe towing. This longer wheelbase is the secret to tighter lane-to-lane cornering as the trailer gets pulled past the rear of the truck similar to a bumper pull trailer. To facilitate the longer wheelbase, the safety hitch has a steerable axle. Not just any axle but a Dana 70 front steering axle found on Super Duty Ford F450 Class 4 truck. Steering is the same on a drop axle cement truck with speed resistance allowing slow speed turning with highway speed keeping the axle aligned with the tow vehicle.

Then there’s braking, hydraulic disc brakes on the Safety Hitch using an actuator. All of your brakes, truck, safety hitch and trailers being towed are synchronized. True proportional braking but with the correct balance where your trailer weight pushes on the safety hitch not the rear of your truck in hard dynamic braking. The difference is remarkable braking improvement and it gives you confidence in towing.

You know your vehicle’s front brakes are larger than rear brakes. When you brake hard, your vehicle nose dives putting more weight and dynamic force on the front brakes. But with a trailer, braking makes the trailer nose dive on the rear of your truck, lifting the trucks front and lowering your truck’s ability for maximum braking.

Not that I’m saying you want to brake hard and upset the horses, but in an emergency, stopping quicker in a shorter distance can save you and your family. We try to keep a safe distance between us and the car in front of us but cars keep pulling in our safety slot, forcing us to rely on braking.

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For my last trip to Logan, Utah to pickup a 2010 Logan horse trailer, I used safety hitch for the trip through the Utah mountains coming in from Wyoming. On curvy mountain roads, I used my hand control of my trailer brake controller and with safety hitch, braking was smooth and powerful. Using the hand control of the trailer brake controller, which only allows use of the trailer brakes and safety hitch brakes, is useful on curves and slick roads. Disconnecting the brakes to the safety hitch for part of the trip was scary as using the trailer brakes alone didn’t provide enough brakes, I had to go back to using the truck’s brakes, too. Wonderful braking for mountains though with no lapse in brake boost hydraulically, which electric over hydraulic brakes commonly have, causing a lag before the vacuum or electric motor brake boost kicks in. Safety hitch has 1,600 PSI hydraulic disc brakes as powerful as what your truck has.

Your trailer brake controller in your truck controls all the brakes. The Titan brake actuator controls the hydraulic brakes on the safety hitch. The custom circuit board on the safety hitch allows all the brakes on the vehicle, safety hitch and trailer to synchronize. And an independent trailer brake controller on the safety hitch is used to control the speed of your trailer when using the auto connect and auto recovery.

This experiment brought home the dramatic brake improvement with automated safety hitch. It has the benefits of a dually with better braking and cornering without being eight feet wide.

Joe Jamieson spent years testing and testing, changing and testing. Each part was tortured for weakness. Joe has the collection of parts that failed and the next generation that succeeded. I saw five years of prototypes at the factory. NASA would be proud. It’s built like a tank – powder coated in what color you want, two warn 8K winches, deep cell battery and of course a 3-year warranty.

American Automation Technologies Inc. started selling the automated safety hitch in July 2008 – six years of prototypes and testing with hundreds on the road today. The auto safety hitch takes weight off the truck and off the trailer. Safety hitch has its own brake controller just to control how fast the trailer connects or disconnects to the truck or how fast your trailer moves using the recovery system. Safety hitch leaf springs are set up for the height of your truck, SUV or van.

Like a weight distributing hitch for goosenecks, Safety Hitch distributes trailer tongue weight to two truck axles. That’s the biggest towing problem for newer half-ton trucks – they have low axle ratio options, enough horsepower and torque and brakes for larger trailers, but have semi-floating rear axles that are not made for constant loads. With automated safety hitch, the trailer tongue weight is spread out to two axles. You don’t even need a hydraulic jack on your trailer, as you can keep the automated safety hitch hooked to your trailer. With the gooseneck hitch in the bed, there’s more blind spots, with the gooseneck on safety hitch, you can use the trucks rear view mirror to see the blind spots over the trucks rear bed.

A man and his machine, Joe Jamieson, the Henry Ford of trailer safety. An aeronautical engineer, well known in the world of aircraft, Joe is a problem solver. He hauls his horses in trailers like the rest of us, but with a twist. Joe thinks towing is an evolutionary process and should improve issues of safety and ease of use. Now with thousands of miles towing with the automated safety hitch, I understand it’s importance and fun. I can take my rig, which at times is 72 feet long, weave in and out of hotel parking lots, small gas stations and switchback mountain roads.

It looks complicated until you understand it. The four features that stand out the most using this new trailer technology are: improved braking, lane-to-lane direction changes, staying in your lane (turning corners), stability and jackknifing with purpose.

The automated safety hitch attaches to a three-point Class V receiver hitch on your vehicle. The connection can articulate vertically for uneven ground or railroad crossings providing an independent suspension. But horizontal movement is solid giving you the safety and stability of a 9 foot longer wheelbase. A longer wheelbase is a known factor for safe towing. This longer wheelbase is the secret to tighter lane-to-lane cornering as the trailer gets pulled past the rear of the truck similar to a bumper pull trailer. To facilitate the longer wheelbase, the safety hitch has a steerable axle. Not just any axle but a Dana 70 front steering axle found on Super Duty Ford F450 Class 4 truck. Steering is the same on a drop axle cement truck with speed resistance allowing slow speed turning with highway speed keeping the axle aligned with the tow vehicle.

Then there’s braking, hydraulic disc brakes on the Safety Hitch using an actuator. All of your brakes, truck, safety hitch and trailers being towed are synchronized. True proportional braking but with the correct balance where your trailer weight pushes on the safety hitch not the rear of your truck in hard dynamic braking. The difference is remarkable braking improvement and it gives you confidence in towing.

You know your vehicle’s front brakes are larger than rear brakes. When you brake hard, your vehicle nose dives putting more weight and dynamic force on the front brakes. But with a trailer, braking makes the trailer nose dive on the rear of your truck, lifting the trucks front and lowering your truck’s ability for maximum braking.

Not that I’m saying you want to brake hard and upset the horses, but in an emergency, stopping quicker in a shorter distance can save you and your family. We try to keep a safe distance between us and the car in front of us but cars keep pulling in our safety slot, forcing us to rely on braking.

For my last trip to Logan, Utah to pickup a 2010 Logan horse trailer, I used safety hitch for the trip through the Utah mountains coming in from Wyoming. On curvy mountain roads, I used my hand control of my trailer brake controller and with safety hitch, braking was smooth and powerful. Using the hand control of the trailer brake controller, which only allows use of the trailer brakes and safety hitch brakes, is useful on curves and slick roads. Disconnecting the brakes to the safety hitch for part of the trip was scary as using the trailer brakes alone didn’t provide enough brakes, I had to go back to using the truck’s brakes, too. Wonderful braking for mountains though with no lapse in brake boost hydraulically, which electric over hydraulic brakes commonly have, causing a lag before the vacuum or electric motor brake boost kicks in. Safety hitch has 1,600 PSI hydraulic disc brakes as powerful as what your truck has.

Your trailer brake controller in your truck controls all the brakes. The Titan brake actuator controls the hydraulic brakes on the safety hitch. The custom circuit board on the safety hitch allows all the brakes on the vehicle, safety hitch and trailer to synchronize. And an independent trailer brake controller on the safety hitch is used to control the speed of your trailer when using the auto connect and auto recovery.

This experiment brought home the dramatic brake improvement with automated safety hitch. It has the benefits of a dually with better braking and cornering without being eight feet wide.

Joe Jamieson spent years testing and testing, changing and testing. Each part was tortured for weakness. Joe has the collection of parts that failed and the next generation that succeeded. I saw five years of prototypes at the factory. NASA would be proud. It’s built like a tank – powder coated in what color you want, two warn 8K winches, deep cell battery and of course a 3-year warranty.

American Automation Technologies Inc. started selling the automated safety hitch in July 2008 – six years of prototypes and testing with hundreds on the road today. The auto safety hitch takes weight off the truck and off the trailer. Safety hitch has its own brake controller just to control how fast the trailer connects or disconnects to the truck or how fast your trailer moves using the recovery system. Safety hitch leaf springs are set up for the height of your truck, SUV or van.

Like a weight distributing hitch for goosenecks, Safety Hitch distributes trailer tongue weight to two truck axles. That’s the biggest towing problem for newer half-ton trucks – they have low axle ratio options, enough horsepower and torque and brakes for larger trailers, but have semi-floating rear axles that are not made for constant loads. With automated safety hitch, the trailer tongue weight is spread out to two axles. You don’t even need a hydraulic jack on your trailer, as you can keep the automated safety hitch hooked to your trailer. With the gooseneck hitch in the bed, there’s more blind spots, with the gooseneck on safety hitch, you can use the trucks rear view mirror to see the blind spots over the trucks rear bed.

A man and his machine, Joe Jamieson, the Henry Ford of trailer safety. An aeronautical engineer, well known in the world of aircraft, Joe is a problem solver. He hauls his horses in trailers like the rest of us, but with a twist. Joe thinks towing is an evolutionary process and should improve issues of safety and ease of use. Now with thousands of miles towing with the automated safety hitch, I understand it’s importance and fun. I can take my rig, which at times is 72 feet long, weave in and out of hotel parking lots, small gas stations and switchback mountain roads.

It looks complicated until you understand it. The four features that stand out the most using this new trailer technology are: improved braking, lane-to-lane direction changes, staying in your lane (turning corners), stability and jackknifing with purpose.

The automated safety hitch attaches to a three-point Class V receiver hitch on your vehicle. The connection can articulate vertically for uneven ground or railroad crossings providing an independent suspension. But horizontal movement is solid giving you the safety and stability of a 9 foot longer wheelbase. A longer wheelbase is a known factor for safe towing. This longer wheelbase is the secret to tighter lane-to-lane cornering as the trailer gets pulled past the rear of the truck similar to a bumper pull trailer. To facilitate the longer wheelbase, the safety hitch has a steerable axle. Not just any axle but a Dana 70 front steering axle found on Super Duty Ford F450 Class 4 truck. Steering is the same on a drop axle cement truck with speed resistance allowing slow speed turning with highway speed keeping the axle aligned with the tow vehicle.

Then there’s braking, hydraulic disc brakes on the Safety Hitch using an actuator. All of your brakes, truck, safety hitch and trailers being towed are synchronized. True proportional braking but with the correct balance where your trailer weight pushes on the safety hitch not the rear of your truck in hard dynamic braking. The difference is remarkable braking improvement and it gives you confidence in towing.

You know your vehicle’s front brakes are larger than rear brakes. When you brake hard, your vehicle nose dives putting more weight and dynamic force on the front brakes. But with a trailer, braking makes the trailer nose dive on the rear of your truck, lifting the trucks front and lowering your truck’s ability for maximum braking.

Not that I’m saying you want to brake hard and upset the horses, but in an emergency, stopping quicker in a shorter distance can save you and your family. We try to keep a safe distance between us and the car in front of us but cars keep pulling in our safety slot, forcing us to rely on braking.

For my last trip to Logan, Utah to pickup a 2010 Logan horse trailer, I used safety hitch for the trip through the Utah mountains coming in from Wyoming. On curvy mountain roads, I used my hand control of my trailer brake controller and with safety hitch, braking was smooth and powerful. Using the hand control of the trailer brake controller, which only allows use of the trailer brakes and safety hitch brakes, is useful on curves and slick roads. Disconnecting the brakes to the safety hitch for part of the trip was scary as using the trailer brakes alone didn’t provide enough brakes, I had to go back to using the truck’s brakes, too. Wonderful braking for mountains though with no lapse in brake boost hydraulically, which electric over hydraulic brakes commonly have, causing a lag before the vacuum or electric motor brake boost kicks in. Safety hitch has 1,600 PSI hydraulic disc brakes as powerful as what your truck has.

Your trailer brake controller in your truck controls all the brakes. The Titan brake actuator controls the hydraulic brakes on the safety hitch. The custom circuit board on the safety hitch allows all the brakes on the vehicle, safety hitch and trailer to synchronize. And an independent trailer brake controller on the safety hitch is used to control the speed of your trailer when using the auto connect and auto recovery.

This experiment brought home the dramatic brake improvement with automated safety hitch. It has the benefits of a dually with better braking and cornering without being eight feet wide.

Joe Jamieson spent years testing and testing, changing and testing. Each part was tortured for weakness. Joe has the collection of parts that failed and the next generation that succeeded. I saw five years of prototypes at the factory. NASA would be proud. It’s built like a tank – powder coated in what color you want, two warn 8K winches, deep cell battery and of course a 3-year warranty.

American Automation Technologies Inc. started selling the automated safety hitch in July 2008 – six years of prototypes and testing with hundreds on the road today. The auto safety hitch takes weight off the truck and off the trailer. Safety hitch has its own brake controller just to control how fast the trailer connects or disconnects to the truck or how fast your trailer moves using the recovery system. Safety hitch leaf springs are set up for the height of your truck, SUV or van.

Like a weight distributing hitch for goosenecks, Safety Hitch distributes trailer tongue weight to two truck axles. That’s the biggest towing problem for newer half-ton trucks – they have low axle ratio options, enough horsepower and torque and brakes for larger trailers, but have semi-floating rear axles that are not made for constant loads. With automated safety hitch, the trailer tongue weight is spread out to two axles. You don’t even need a hydraulic jack on your trailer, as you can keep the automated safety hitch hooked to your trailer. With the gooseneck hitch in the bed, there’s more blind spots, with the gooseneck on safety hitch, you can use the trucks rear view mirror to see the blind spots over the trucks rear bed.

A man and his machine, Joe Jamieson, the Henry Ford of trailer safety. An aeronautical engineer, well known in the world of aircraft, Joe is a problem solver. He hauls his horses in trailers like the rest of us, but with a twist. Joe thinks towing is an evolutionary process and should improve issues of safety and ease of use. Now with thousands of miles towing with the automated safety hitch, I understand it’s importance and fun. I can take my rig, which at times is 72 feet long, weave in and out of hotel parking lots, small gas stations and switchback mountain roads.

It looks complicated until you understand it. The four features that stand out the most using this new trailer technology are: improved braking, lane-to-lane direction changes, staying in your lane (turning corners), stability and jackknifing with purpose.

The automated safety hitch attaches to a three-point Class V receiver hitch on your vehicle. The connection can articulate vertically for uneven ground or railroad crossings providing an independent suspension. But horizontal movement is solid giving you the safety and stability of a 9 foot longer wheelbase. A longer wheelbase is a known factor for safe towing. This longer wheelbase is the secret to tighter lane-to-lane cornering as the trailer gets pulled past the rear of the truck similar to a bumper pull trailer. To facilitate the longer wheelbase, the safety hitch has a steerable axle. Not just any axle but a Dana 70 front steering axle found on Super Duty Ford F450 Class 4 truck. Steering is the same on a drop axle cement truck with speed resistance allowing slow speed turning with highway speed keeping the axle aligned with the tow vehicle.

Then there’s braking, hydraulic disc brakes on the Safety Hitch using an actuator. All of your brakes, truck, safety hitch and trailers being towed are synchronized. True proportional braking but with the correct balance where your trailer weight pushes on the safety hitch not the rear of your truck in hard dynamic braking. The difference is remarkable braking improvement and it gives you confidence in towing.

You know your vehicle’s front brakes are larger than rear brakes. When you brake hard, your vehicle nose dives putting more weight and dynamic force on the front brakes. But with a trailer, braking makes the trailer nose dive on the rear of your truck, lifting the trucks front and lowering your truck’s ability for maximum braking.

Not that I’m saying you want to brake hard and upset the horses, but in an emergency, stopping quicker in a shorter distance can save you and your family. We try to keep a safe distance between us and the car in front of us but cars keep pulling in our safety slot, forcing us to rely on braking.

For my last trip to Logan, Utah to pickup a 2010 Logan horse trailer, I used safety hitch for the trip through the Utah mountains coming in from Wyoming. On curvy mountain roads, I used my hand control of my trailer brake controller and with safety hitch, braking was smooth and powerful. Using the hand control of the trailer brake controller, which only allows use of the trailer brakes and safety hitch brakes, is useful on curves and slick roads. Disconnecting the brakes to the safety hitch for part of the trip was scary as using the trailer brakes alone didn’t provide enough brakes, I had to go back to using the truck’s brakes, too. Wonderful braking for mountains though with no lapse in brake boost hydraulically, which electric over hydraulic brakes commonly have, causing a lag before the vacuum or electric motor brake boost kicks in. Safety hitch has 1,600 PSI hydraulic disc brakes as powerful as what your truck has.

Your trailer brake controller in your truck controls all the brakes. The Titan brake actuator controls the hydraulic brakes on the safety hitch. The custom circuit board on the safety hitch allows all the brakes on the vehicle, safety hitch and trailer to synchronize. And an independent trailer brake controller on the safety hitch is used to control the speed of your trailer when using the auto connect and auto recovery.

This experiment brought home the dramatic brake improvement with automated safety hitch. It has the benefits of a dually with better braking and cornering without being eight feet wide.

Joe Jamieson spent years testing and testing, changing and testing. Each part was tortured for weakness. Joe has the collection of parts that failed and the next generation that succeeded. I saw five years of prototypes at the factory. NASA would be proud. It’s built like a tank – powder coated in what color you want, two warn 8K winches, deep cell battery and of course a 3-year warranty.

American Automation Technologies Inc. started selling the automated safety hitch in July 2008 – six years of prototypes and testing with hundreds on the road today. The auto safety hitch takes weight off the truck and off the trailer. Safety hitch has its own brake controller just to control how fast the trailer connects or disconnects to the truck or how fast your trailer moves using the recovery system. Safety hitch leaf springs are set up for the height of your truck, SUV or van.

Like a weight distributing hitch for goosenecks, Safety Hitch distributes trailer tongue weight to two truck axles. That’s the biggest towing problem for newer half-ton trucks – they have low axle ratio options, enough horsepower and torque and brakes for larger trailers, but have semi-floating rear axles that are not made for constant loads. With automated safety hitch, the trailer tongue weight is spread out to two axles. You don’t even need a hydraulic jack on your trailer, as you can keep the automated safety hitch hooked to your trailer. With the gooseneck hitch in the bed, there’s more blind spots, with the gooseneck on safety hitch, you can use the trucks rear view mirror to see the blind spots over the trucks rear bed.

A man and his machine, Joe Jamieson, the Henry Ford of trailer safety. An aeronautical engineer, well known in the world of aircraft, Joe is a problem solver. He hauls his horses in trailers like the rest of us, but with a twist. Joe thinks towing is an evolutionary process and should improve issues of safety and ease of use. Now with thousands of miles towing with the automated safety hitch, I understand it’s importance and fun. I can take my rig, which at times is 72 feet long, weave in and out of hotel parking lots, small gas stations and switchback mountain roads.

It looks complicated until you understand it. The four features that stand out the most using this new trailer technology are: improved braking, lane-to-lane direction changes, staying in your lane (turning corners), stability and jackknifing with purpose.

The automated safety hitch attaches to a three-point Class V receiver hitch on your vehicle. The connection can articulate vertically for uneven ground or railroad crossings providing an independent suspension. But horizontal movement is solid giving you the safety and stability of a 9 foot longer wheelbase. A longer wheelbase is a known factor for safe towing. This longer wheelbase is the secret to tighter lane-to-lane cornering as the trailer gets pulled past the rear of the truck similar to a bumper pull trailer. To facilitate the longer wheelbase, the safety hitch has a steerable axle. Not just any axle but a Dana 70 front steering axle found on Super Duty Ford F450 Class 4 truck. Steering is the same on a drop axle cement truck with speed resistance allowing slow speed turning with highway speed keeping the axle aligned with the tow vehicle.

Then there’s braking, hydraulic disc brakes on the Safety Hitch using an actuator. All of your brakes, truck, safety hitch and trailers being towed are synchronized. True proportional braking but with the correct balance where your trailer weight pushes on the safety hitch not the rear of your truck in hard dynamic braking. The difference is remarkable braking improvement and it gives you confidence in towing.

You know your vehicle’s front brakes are larger than rear brakes. When you brake hard, your vehicle nose dives putting more weight and dynamic force on the front brakes. But with a trailer, braking makes the trailer nose dive on the rear of your truck, lifting the trucks front and lowering your truck’s ability for maximum braking.

Not that I’m saying you want to brake hard and upset the horses, but in an emergency, stopping quicker in a shorter distance can save you and your family. We try to keep a safe distance between us and the car in front of us but cars keep pulling in our safety slot, forcing us to rely on braking.

For my last trip to Logan, Utah to pickup a 2010 Logan horse trailer, I used safety hitch for the trip through the Utah mountains coming in from Wyoming. On curvy mountain roads, I used my hand control of my trailer brake controller and with safety hitch, braking was smooth and powerful. Using the hand control of the trailer brake controller, which only allows use of the trailer brakes and safety hitch brakes, is useful on curves and slick roads. Disconnecting the brakes to the safety hitch for part of the trip was scary as using the trailer brakes alone didn’t provide enough brakes, I had to go back to using the truck’s brakes, too. Wonderful braking for mountains though with no lapse in brake boost hydraulically, which electric over hydraulic brakes commonly have, causing a lag before the vacuum or electric motor brake boost kicks in. Safety hitch has 1,600 PSI hydraulic disc brakes as powerful as what your truck has.

Your trailer brake controller in your truck controls all the brakes. The Titan brake actuator controls the hydraulic brakes on the safety hitch. The custom circuit board on the safety hitch allows all the brakes on the vehicle, safety hitch and trailer to synchronize. And an independent trailer brake controller on the safety hitch is used to control the speed of your trailer when using the auto connect and auto recovery.

This experiment brought home the dramatic brake improvement with automated safety hitch. It has the benefits of a dually with better braking and cornering without being eight feet wide.

Joe Jamieson spent years testing and testing, changing and testing. Each part was tortured for weakness. Joe has the collection of parts that failed and the next generation that succeeded. I saw five years of prototypes at the factory. NASA would be proud. It’s built like a tank – powder coated in what color you want, two warn 8K winches, deep cell battery and of course a 3-year warranty.

American Automation Technologies Inc. started selling the automated safety hitch in July 2008 – six years of prototypes and testing with hundreds on the road today. The auto safety hitch takes weight off the truck and off the trailer. Safety hitch has its own brake controller just to control how fast the trailer connects or disconnects to the truck or how fast your trailer moves using the recovery system. Safety hitch leaf springs are set up for the height of your truck, SUV or van.

Like a weight distributing hitch for goosenecks, Safety Hitch distributes trailer tongue weight to two truck axles. That’s the biggest towing problem for newer half-ton trucks – they have low axle ratio options, enough horsepower and torque and brakes for larger trailers, but have semi-floating rear axles that are not made for constant loads. With automated safety hitch, the trailer tongue weight is spread out to two axles. You don’t even need a hydraulic jack on your trailer, as you can keep the automated safety hitch hooked to your trailer. With the gooseneck hitch in the bed, there’s more blind spots, with the gooseneck on safety hitch, you can use the trucks rear view mirror to see the blind spots over the trucks rear bed.

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