Fooled by fake news | TheFencePost.com

Fooled by fake news

I was a victim of fake news last week. Embarrassing, yes. End of the world, no.

I saw a story on Facebook about Adam Sandler, who was passing by Grand Forks, N.D., in a rental car. He had some mechanical issues and was stopped by the side of the road.

Along comes some friendly North Dakotans one of whom had a brother who had a tow truck. So the tow truck came and pulled Sandler's car to a garage to be fixed.

In the meantime, the North Dakotans take Sandler to lunch in downtown Grand Forks to a place I have been to many times called Bonzer's.

And, of course, these people have no idea who Sandler is so they treat him just like they would anyone else.

At the end of the story is a fake quote from Sandler, "You have to understand, this is something that would've never happened in L.A.! So yeah, that's my story about Grand Forks, North Dakota. It's nice to know there are still places like this in America."

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He also said he was going to retire in Grand Forks.

I posted it on my Facebook page and my friends immediately notified me that it was fake news.

In my defense, this could have happened.

If my parents had come across Sandler and his disabled car, they would have stopped to help, and wouldn't have known who he was.

My mother probably would have bent his ear about all of her medical problems and my father would've been trying to fix his car rather than calling a tow truck. Unless the car had a computer system, then he would have left it up to the experts. They wouldn't have taken him to Bonzer's, but they would have probably taken him to their favorite truck stop for a bite to eat.

My father would have insisted on paying and then they would send him on his way.

I guess this is a lesson for all of us, don't believe everything you read even though it could have happened. ❖

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