Springhill Farm’s Beautiful Belgians | TheFencePost.com

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Springhill Farm’s Beautiful Belgians

Springhill Lisa pictured as a 5-year-old with her filly colt.

Belgians are touted as “The Draft Horse Breed Supreme.” Springhill Farm of Dalton, Ohio, has bred and developed a stable of Belgians befitting the breed. The versatile Springhill Farm Belgians can be found working on Amish farms, shown in competitive halter classes and paraded in a variety of hitches.

The Belgian Draft Horse Corporation of America first started as a partnership of the Wabash Importing Company in Wabash, Ind., where it remains today. The modern breed type is different than that of the European type. Color has changed dramatically from the early Belgian. Today’s prominent colors are: blonde, sorrel, roans with light points and chestnuts. The white manes and tails are the most desired. The white stripe is also sought after. Most all of the color variations will have light colored legs, but not necessarily white socks.

Located in the heart of the world’s largest Amish population, Levi Jay and Anna Beachy of Springhill Farm along with their family have depended on Belgians for their lifeblood. It all started with Levi as a young boy. “I grew up on a farm near Berlin, Ohio. I was six or seven when I first worked a team of mules at home. I later remember my dad buying his first team of Belgian horses at the local sale in Kidron. I was probably eight or nine at the time. I really took a liking to that team of Belgians because they had a good disposition. And, they always gave you a good day’s work without tiring out. We’ve had Belgians ever since,” Levi related.

Belgians are touted as “The Draft Horse Breed Supreme.” Springhill Farm of Dalton, Ohio, has bred and developed a stable of Belgians befitting the breed. The versatile Springhill Farm Belgians can be found working on Amish farms, shown in competitive halter classes and paraded in a variety of hitches.

The Belgian Draft Horse Corporation of America first started as a partnership of the Wabash Importing Company in Wabash, Ind., where it remains today. The modern breed type is different than that of the European type. Color has changed dramatically from the early Belgian. Today’s prominent colors are: blonde, sorrel, roans with light points and chestnuts. The white manes and tails are the most desired. The white stripe is also sought after. Most all of the color variations will have light colored legs, but not necessarily white socks.

Located in the heart of the world’s largest Amish population, Levi Jay and Anna Beachy of Springhill Farm along with their family have depended on Belgians for their lifeblood. It all started with Levi as a young boy. “I grew up on a farm near Berlin, Ohio. I was six or seven when I first worked a team of mules at home. I later remember my dad buying his first team of Belgian horses at the local sale in Kidron. I was probably eight or nine at the time. I really took a liking to that team of Belgians because they had a good disposition. And, they always gave you a good day’s work without tiring out. We’ve had Belgians ever since,” Levi related.

Belgians are touted as “The Draft Horse Breed Supreme.” Springhill Farm of Dalton, Ohio, has bred and developed a stable of Belgians befitting the breed. The versatile Springhill Farm Belgians can be found working on Amish farms, shown in competitive halter classes and paraded in a variety of hitches.

The Belgian Draft Horse Corporation of America first started as a partnership of the Wabash Importing Company in Wabash, Ind., where it remains today. The modern breed type is different than that of the European type. Color has changed dramatically from the early Belgian. Today’s prominent colors are: blonde, sorrel, roans with light points and chestnuts. The white manes and tails are the most desired. The white stripe is also sought after. Most all of the color variations will have light colored legs, but not necessarily white socks.

Located in the heart of the world’s largest Amish population, Levi Jay and Anna Beachy of Springhill Farm along with their family have depended on Belgians for their lifeblood. It all started with Levi as a young boy. “I grew up on a farm near Berlin, Ohio. I was six or seven when I first worked a team of mules at home. I later remember my dad buying his first team of Belgian horses at the local sale in Kidron. I was probably eight or nine at the time. I really took a liking to that team of Belgians because they had a good disposition. And, they always gave you a good day’s work without tiring out. We’ve had Belgians ever since,” Levi related.

Belgians are touted as “The Draft Horse Breed Supreme.” Springhill Farm of Dalton, Ohio, has bred and developed a stable of Belgians befitting the breed. The versatile Springhill Farm Belgians can be found working on Amish farms, shown in competitive halter classes and paraded in a variety of hitches.

The Belgian Draft Horse Corporation of America first started as a partnership of the Wabash Importing Company in Wabash, Ind., where it remains today. The modern breed type is different than that of the European type. Color has changed dramatically from the early Belgian. Today’s prominent colors are: blonde, sorrel, roans with light points and chestnuts. The white manes and tails are the most desired. The white stripe is also sought after. Most all of the color variations will have light colored legs, but not necessarily white socks.

Located in the heart of the world’s largest Amish population, Levi Jay and Anna Beachy of Springhill Farm along with their family have depended on Belgians for their lifeblood. It all started with Levi as a young boy. “I grew up on a farm near Berlin, Ohio. I was six or seven when I first worked a team of mules at home. I later remember my dad buying his first team of Belgian horses at the local sale in Kidron. I was probably eight or nine at the time. I really took a liking to that team of Belgians because they had a good disposition. And, they always gave you a good day’s work without tiring out. We’ve had Belgians ever since,” Levi related.

Belgians are touted as “The Draft Horse Breed Supreme.” Springhill Farm of Dalton, Ohio, has bred and developed a stable of Belgians befitting the breed. The versatile Springhill Farm Belgians can be found working on Amish farms, shown in competitive halter classes and paraded in a variety of hitches.

The Belgian Draft Horse Corporation of America first started as a partnership of the Wabash Importing Company in Wabash, Ind., where it remains today. The modern breed type is different than that of the European type. Color has changed dramatically from the early Belgian. Today’s prominent colors are: blonde, sorrel, roans with light points and chestnuts. The white manes and tails are the most desired. The white stripe is also sought after. Most all of the color variations will have light colored legs, but not necessarily white socks.

Located in the heart of the world’s largest Amish population, Levi Jay and Anna Beachy of Springhill Farm along with their family have depended on Belgians for their lifeblood. It all started with Levi as a young boy. “I grew up on a farm near Berlin, Ohio. I was six or seven when I first worked a team of mules at home. I later remember my dad buying his first team of Belgian horses at the local sale in Kidron. I was probably eight or nine at the time. I really took a liking to that team of Belgians because they had a good disposition. And, they always gave you a good day’s work without tiring out. We’ve had Belgians ever since,” Levi related.