Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo hitting its stride | TheFencePost.com

Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo hitting its stride

In its 13th year of being a ranch rodeo sanctioned by the Working Ranch Cowboys Association, the Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo (CCRR) in Hugo, Colo., was at its best. Hundreds of people from the small town and surrounding area arrived over the weekend of June 27-28 to take in the sights and sounds of genuine cowboys taking part in events designed to show off their skills and the horses they ride. "I thought it was a great year," said rodeo secretary Tina Waite. "Probably our best year, yet." Asked what made it such a success this year, Waite thought adding to the Western feel with a chuck wagon cooking competition made a big difference. "We (pre-sold) 200 tickets to feed people at the chuck wagons," she said about the cooking contest that had six authentic wagons serving up meat, potatoes, bread, beans and peach cobblers. "That was an extra group of people that don't normally come." "That's a good thing," Waite added. "We just thought we'd give it a try this year and I think it is going to work. It turned out pretty good (and) everybody was pleased with it." While the public turned out by the hundreds for a chance to eat some old west, cowboy style cooking, the chuck wagon crews started early in the day to make the taste memorable. "You're against some of the best cooks around," said Royce Pindell from the overall winning Lizzie II chuck wagon, run by Rex and Sheryl Wailes from Bennett, Colo. "Most all of these people do catering. If they're good enough to cater, then someone pays them to do this, and we go up against everyone having good recipes. I've never seen a bad meal come out of a chuck wagon in all the competitions we take part in." Ticket buyers seemed to agree with Pindell's assessment as they eagerly accepted plenty of food from every wagon in the cookoff. Judging by the array of empty dutch ovens at the conclusion of the event, it is safe to say everyone left satisfied. "I think it went really, really well for a first time deal," offered Delbert "Doc" Jones, who was asked by CCRR to organize the chuck wagon competition for them. "They exceeded their expectations." "I was thrilled to death with the wagons, the crews, everything," he said after the contest was finished. "It's a real thrill for a lot of people. It's something new and it's something neat." • There was always something neat going on inside the arena, as well. Real cowboys from working ranches came to the rodeo to try their hands at events like wild-cow milking, team doctoring, team branding, sorting and ranch bronc riding. "I think it's great because it gets to show everybody all the hard work these guys put in day in and day out," said Jessica Mosher, who comes from a dyed in the wool ranch and rodeo family in Karval, Colo. Mosher was not only a cowgirl interested in watching the ranch events, she was also one of the "pick up men" inside the arena during the bronc riding, a job she's held down in numerous rodeos over the last number of years. "It gets to showcase their skills and their horses, too," Mosher continued, as she answered questions behind the scenes. "You've got good food (and) good entertainment. I think it's great all the way around." On top of the ranch rodeo events, there was also a ranch horse show. Cowboys who entered their horses would perform a reining pattern in the arena, which was immediately followed by working a cow. With two divisions for horses, senior (6 years old and over) and junior (5 years or younger), the horse show was a great way to see gorgeous and smart ranch horses in action. "We had 30 horses last year and we had 43 this year," said Waite about the increasing numbers of cowboys that want to work their horses in a competitive setting. "They make some pretty nice horses. Those guys have pretty good skills." While they all want to win each event, these types of rodeos are as much fun for the cowboys as they are work. "It's like a mini-vacation (for them)," added Waite about the good times cowboys have at ranch rodeos. "All the branding is done and everything is turned out to summer country and they can kind of take a weekend off and come have some fun." After 13 years of working with a dedicated committee to host a sanctioned ranch rodeo in Hugo, Waite was asked what she might say to anyone who has thought about attending, but hasn't yet shown up for the event. "It's just different than a regular rodeo," she explained about its draw. "People get to see pictures of cowboys, but they never really get to see cowboys in action, so this kind of gives them a chance to do this. It's about keeping the heritage alive." ❖

113th Cheyenne Frontier Days kicks off with annual cattle drive

With the first of 500 Corriente steers cresting the hill north of Cheyenne, Wyo., the 113th Cheyenne Frontier Days was officially underway. In this annual event, Committee Chairmen, Dandies, wranglers, volunteers, guests, and family gather for a chuck wagon breakfast and some socializing before driving the cattle to the rodeo pens at Frontier Park. When everyone has had their fill of a hearty breakfast of sausage, eggs, and biscuits and gravy, all cooked to perfection in Dutch Ovens, the real work of moving the timed event steers to Frontier Park begins. The guests and media load onto the vintage wagons that will lead the procession along the I-25 frontage Road from Horse Creek Road to Central Avenue. The herd turns right off of Central just past the golf course and continues into the back entrance to Frontier Park. This annual event is always enjoyed by the many onlookers that line the roads along the route. Traffic along the route is controlled by the Cheyenne police and the Wyoming Highway Patrol keeps traffic moving along I-25. It is always interesting to see that the cars from Colorado and Wyoming hardly slow down, while the cars bearing plates from eastern states slow to almost a crawl. The windows open, the kids shout, and cameras are thrust through the window to record an image of the ‘wild west’ to show to folks back at home. Working with large groups of animals is always an adventure waiting to happen. Last year the steers ran all the way to the park. This year the herd took a more leisurely pace and the cattle were easily distracted by the lush green grass along I-25 that bountiful spring rains had produced. The herd was pretty stubborn and when it stopped, the wranglers had a real job on their hands to get them moving again. Most of the people on horse back were ceremonial and the real cowboys had their hands full getting and keeping the herd moving in the right direction. The Dandies, the Cheyenne Frontier Days precision mounted group, served as out-riders to keep the herd from crossing onto I-25. A rodeo as large as Cheyenne Frontier Days can not function without a huge crew of very capable volunteers. When it comes to moving animals, one prominent volunteer always on hand is 2000 World Champion Steer Wrestler Frank Thompson. Frank and the rest of the wranglers did a great job not only in keeping the cattle moving, but also in making sure no adventurous animals took advantage of breaks in the fence at intersections to take off on their own. Once inside of Frontier Park the cattle are driven once around the track and into the pens. Then a new group of volunteers will sort the cattle, put horn wraps on the Steer and Team Roping animals, and get ready for the start of events at the 113th annual “Daddy of ’em All”.

The 115th Cheyenne Frontier Days is underway

It is official – the 115th Cheyenne Frontier Days is underway. As the Corriente steers roll over the hill it marks the beginning of The Daddy of ’em All. This tradition goes back generations. It used to be the only way to get the animals from their pasture where F.E. Warren Air Force Base sits now, to Frontier Park. Then someone figured out that it was a lot easier to truck the steers to the park, so they quit doing it. Then, sometime in the mid 1980s the cattle drive was revived and continues to this day. The Cattle Drive of today is more symbolic than functional, but it is a great way for invited guests, Committee Chairmen, Dandies, wranglers, volunteers and family to get together for a chuck wagon breakfast and some socializing before getting down to the serious business of putting on the 115th edition of the worlds largest western celebration. Everyone has a hearty breakfast of sausage, eggs, and biscuits and gravy, all cooked to perfection in Dutch Ovens, to get into the right frame of mind for a cattle drive. The drive starts north of Cheyenne and runs south on the service road, parallel to I-25, turns left onto Central, past Kiwanis Lake, turns right onto Kennedy Road, and eventually winds its way to Frontier Park. The entire trip is roughly 6-miles. It is quite a procession with vintage wagons and buggies loaded with media and guests leading the way. Next comes Miss Cheyenne Frontier Days and the Lady in Waiting, followed by 300 Corriente steers. The Committee Chairmen bring up the rear and the whole procession is surrounded by cowboys that hopefully can keep the steers together and moving forward. The Cattle Drive follows the same route to Frontier Park every year and is held on the Sunday before the first rodeo performance. This annual event is always enjoyed by the many onlookers that line the roads along the route. Traffic along the route is controlled by the Cheyenne police and the Wyoming Highway Patrol takes care of keeping traffic moving along I-25. It is always interesting to see that the cars from Colorado and Wyoming hardly slow down, while the cars bearing plates from eastern states slow to almost a crawl. The windows open, the kids shout, and cameras are thrust through the window to record an image of the ‘wild west’ to show to folks back at home. Once the steers reach the arena, the cowboys take over the job of moving the herd from the Committee Chairmen. Then it is once around the track and into pens where they are sorted, fitted with horn wraps and readied for timed event action at the 115th Cheyenne Frontier Days. It is official – the 115th Cheyenne Frontier Days is underway. As the Corriente steers roll over the hill it marks the beginning of The Daddy of ’em All. This tradition goes back generations. It used to be the only way to get the animals from their pasture where F.E. Warren Air Force Base sits now, to Frontier Park. Then someone figured out that it was a lot easier to truck the steers to the park, so they quit doing it. Then, sometime in the mid 1980s the cattle drive was revived and continues to this day. The Cattle Drive of today is more symbolic than functional, but it is a great way for invited guests, Committee Chairmen, Dandies, wranglers, volunteers and family to get together for a chuck wagon breakfast and some socializing before getting down to the serious business of putting on the 115th edition of the worlds largest western celebration. Everyone has a hearty breakfast of sausage, eggs, and biscuits and gravy, all cooked to perfection in Dutch Ovens, to get into the right frame of mind for a cattle drive. The drive starts north of Cheyenne and runs south on the service road, parallel to I-25, turns left onto Central, past Kiwanis Lake, turns right onto Kennedy Road, and eventually winds its way to Frontier Park. The entire trip is roughly 6-miles. It is quite a procession with vintage wagons and buggies loaded with media and guests leading the way. Next comes Miss Cheyenne Frontier Days and the Lady in Waiting, followed by 300 Corriente steers. The Committee Chairmen bring up the rear and the whole procession is surrounded by cowboys that hopefully can keep the steers together and moving forward. The Cattle Drive follows the same route to Frontier Park every year and is held on the Sunday before the first rodeo performance. This annual event is always enjoyed by the many onlookers that line the roads along the route. Traffic along the route is controlled by the Cheyenne police and the Wyoming Highway Patrol takes care of keeping traffic moving along I-25. It is always interesting to see that the cars from Colorado and Wyoming hardly slow down, while the cars bearing plates from eastern states slow to almost a crawl. The windows open, the kids shout, and cameras are thrust through the window to record an image of the ‘wild west’ to show to folks back at home. Once the steers reach the arena, the cowboys take over the job of moving the herd from the Committee Chairmen. Then it is once around the track and into pens where they are sorted, fitted with horn wraps and readied for timed event action at the 115th Cheyenne Frontier Days.

Ride for the Brand Ranch Rodeo was a huge success

What better way to celebrate the 4th of July in the West than to drive some Longhorns through downtown Colorado Springs, have a Chuckwagon Cook-off, and top it off with some of the best ranch cowboys getting together and seeing who is better at the jobs that they do every day. If that is your idea of fun, then you would have fit right in with all of the folks at the Norris-Penrose Event Center in Colorado Springs, Colo. They were there to enjoy the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo and Chuckwagon Cook-off. Twelve teams from ranches in Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas, Montana, Wyoming, and Texas, came to Colorado Springs to compete for their chance to go to the ‘big show’ in Amarillo, Texas, in November. The Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) chooses the teams that compete in the World Championship Ranch Rodeo from those ranches that win a sanctioned ranch rodeo. Colorado currently has two sanctioned ranch rodeos, one in Hugo and the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo in Colorado Springs. Professional rodeo events in PRCA rodeos can more or less trace their roots back to jobs that working ranch cowboys did. However, that linage has gotten a little fuzzy over the years. You are not going to find too many working cowboys who will climb on bulls or jump from racing horses in the course of a normal working day. Ranch Rodeo and Professional Rodeo are completely different. It is not that one is better than the other – they are just different. Ranch rodeo teams must be working members of a ranch. They have to work a minimum amount of time in a year – no ‘ringers’ allowed. The big difference is that the emphasis in ranch rodeo is on the team, just like it is every day on the ranch. With the obvious exception of Saddlebronc, team members compete as a team in each event. Ranch rodeo events are based on things that are done all the time on a working ranch. Even the crowd favorite, Wild Cow Milking, has to be done on occasion, during the normal course of duties on a ranch. Thankfully, not too often, as it is the wildest and most ‘western’ of the events. The concept of the WRCA and the sanctioned Ranch Rodeo came about when working cowboy turned cowboy poet, Waddie Mitchell got together with some other cowboys to create an organization with an educational arm to show folks where that hamburger came from, a Scholarship Fund for ranch kids, a venue for ranch cowboys to show off their skills, and a Cowboy Crisis Fund to help families of injured cowboys. It is that Cowboy Crisis Fund that is the real reason behind the Ride for the Brand Ranch Rodeo. It is the culmination of a partnership between two college friends, Mark Bukowski, a Director of the WRCA, and Robert Alexander, the President of the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Foundation. “The Pikes Peak or Bust Foundation has for the past 60 years been raising money for military charities.” said Alexander, “What’s unique about this event is that we raise money for military charities, but also for the WRCA Cowboy Crisis Fund. Mark and I are real proud of the fact that we have a great community event where at the end of the day Mark Bukowski has a check for the WRCA Cowboy Crisis Fund and we have a check for our men and women in the military service.” This year was a little different in that a Chuckwagon Cook-off was added. After the wagon judging and the judging of a required plate, the cooks set about doing what they do best, which is cooking good food for lots of people. Tickets were sold and the public could sample the fare from all of the wagons. “What we are trying to do is to start a national tradition of a Chuckwagon Cook-off here at Norris-Penrose because on the 4th of July, there is not a lot going on with chuckwagons across the country.” said Mark Bukowski, “On top of the great location at the base of Pikes Peak, the wagons like being associated with ranch rodeo. A lot of the wagons here work on the big ranches.” The ranch rodeo was a big success. There were some new ranches that did very well, but, in the end, experience rose to the top. Taking first place was the Haythorn Ranch from Arthur, Nebraska. For their win the team won $5000 and each team member won a buckle, but the most important thing was that the Haythorn Ranch had ‘punched their ticket’ to the WRCA Championships for the sixth time. The combined team of Wilson Cattle and the T4 Ranch from Texas won second place. The Crutch Ranch, also from Texas, took third place. Two other coveted awards were won by the Sandhill Cattle Company which is located in Earth, Texas. Owner Trip Townsend won the best ranch horse award, which is presented by the AQHA, and his partner, Riley Smith won the Top Hand Award. Gina Kaiser, a member of the ten person committee that put on the Ride for the Brand Ranch Rodeo, was very pleased with the outcome of the event. “It was the best turnout that we have ever had. We’re really pleased. The Chuckwagon Cook-off was awesome. Contestants were very happy – it was a nice, nice, event. We don’t know the numbers for the charities yet, but it’s going to be good.” Next 4th of July weekend make plans to attend the Ride for the Brand Ranch Rodeo. You will see some great cowboy action and be contributing to a couple of worthy causes at the same time.

Rocky Mountain Horse Events

Horse Events Horse and Rodeo Events are provided weekly as a free service to our readers. If you have any questions or need more information about having an event listed, please call: (970) 686-5691, 1-800-275-5646 or e-mail adietz@thefencepost.com. August 28 – Joe & Kim Andrews Trail Riding Clinic, Loveland, Colo., (970) 613-0121, http://www.MountainMagicRanch.com. – Barnes State Fair Finals, Pueblo, Colo., (719) 404-2024, lindsay.wadhams@ag.state.co.us. – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Ft. Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. August 29 – Burns Ranch Arena Practice, 6:30 p.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 554-0170 or (970) 345-6376. August 30 – Rappels Barrel Race Award Series, Pract.-6 p.m., JP- 7:30 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 381-6628, (970) 381-9325 or http://www.canrunevents.com. August 31 – Rappel’s Arena Buckle Roping, Enter-6:30 p.m. Rope -7 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 590-2008. August 31- September 2 – Colorado Draft Horse Classic, Garfield Cnty Fairgrounds, Rifle, Colo., (970) 379-3814 or http://www.codrafthorseclassic.com. September 1-3 – Rocky Mountain Super Race, Norris-Penrose Event Center, (719) 338-5263 or http://www.BarrelRacingNow.com. September 1 – Colorado Horse Natural Horsemanship Show, Parker, Colo., (303) 646-3595. – Circle A Jr./Family Rodeo Series, Reg. 3 p.m., Rodeo 4 p.m., Greeley, Colo.,(970)352-0654, dioneluark314@msn.com. September 2 – NCRC Jackpot & Gymkhana Buckle Series, GSC Arena, Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-5809, (970) 330-1103, http://www.northcoloridingclub.com. – Tri County Arena Practice Team Gymkhana, 12- 4 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. September 3 – Greeley Saddle Club Horse Show/Gymkhana, Judg. 8 a.m., Gymk.1:30 p.m., GSC Arena, Greeley, Colo., (970) 353-0191 or (303) 536-4098, http://www.greeleysaddleclub.org. September 4 – Joe & Kim Andrews Trail Riding Clinic, Loveland, Colo., (970) 613-0121, http://www.MountainMagicRanch.com. – CRGC Meeting, 7 p.m., Brighton, Colo., (303) 919-3141, (303) 654-1866. – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Ft. Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. September 6 – Rappels Barrel Race Award Series, Pract.-6 p.m., JP- 7:30 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 381-6628, (970) 381-9325 or http://www.canrunevents.com. September 6-9 – Colorado Horse Fall Preview H/J, Parker, Colo., (818) 563-3250. September 7- 10 – P. Dietz Horsemanship & Cow Working Workshop, Sedalia, Colo., (303) 210-3669 or (303) 518-4503, http://www.pauldietzhorsemanship.com. September 7 – Rappel’s Arena Buckle Roping, Enter-6:30 p.m. Rope -7 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 590-2008. September 8- 10 – RMLEA Scott La Fever Mule & Horse Clinic, (303) 655-1345. September 8 – CRGC Open Gymkhana, 9 a.m., Fairgrounds, Henderson, Colo., (303) 919-3141, (303) 654-1866. – Aurora Horsemen’s Assoc. Horse Show & Gymkhana Series, 8 a.m., Aurora, Colo., (720) 857-6160, http://www.aurorahorsemens.com. – Rockie Mtn. Saddle Club Horse Shows, 8 a.m., Wellington, Colo., (970) 484-1233 or (970) 218-5550. – RMLEA Chuck Wagon Dinner, (303) 655-1345. September 9 – Saddle Series Horse Show, 7:30 a.m., Indiana E.C., Arvada, Colo., (303) 422-1762, http://www.saddleseries.com. – NCRC Open Show Buckle Series, GSC Arena, Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-5809, (970) 330-1103, http://www.northcoloridingclub.com. – Mile Hi Buckskin Open All Breed & Buckskin show, 8 a.m., Ft. Collins, Colo., (303) 833-2115, buckskin5280@aol.com or http://www.MHBHA.com. – Johnstown Saddle Club Gymkhana, 9 a.m., Johnstown, Colo., (970) 587-5179 or (970) 566-1084. – Lazy M NBHA Colo. Div. 2 Race, Exh.- 10 a.m., Races- 12 p.m., Brighton, Colo., (303) 536-4426 or (720) 685-7864. September 10-11 – Colorado Horse CHJA Clinic, Parker, Colo., (818) 563-3250. September 11 – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Ft. Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. September 13 – Rappels Barrel Race Award Series, Pract.-6 p.m., JP- 7:30 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 381-6628, (970) 381-9325 or http://www.canrunevents.com. September 13-16 – Colorado Horse Fall Classic H/J, Parker, Colo., (818) 563-3250. September 14-16 – Barnes T-Cross Ranch Roundup, Pueblo, Colo., (719) 520-1000, cindylrose@aol.com. September 14 – Rappel’s Arena Buckle Roping, Enter-6:30 p.m. Rope -7 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 590-2008. September 15 – RMRR Open Gymkhana/Pleasure & 4D Barrel Race, 9 a.m., Ft. Lupton, Colo., (970) 310-4906, (303) 913-5561 or http://www.Rockymountainrebelriders.homestead.com. – Circle A Jr./Family Rodeo , Reg. 3 p.m., Rodeo 4 p.m., Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-0654, dioneluark314@msn.com. – Lazy M NBHA Colo. Div. 2 Races, Exh.-10 a.m., Races-12 p.m. & 2 p.m., Brighton, Colo., (303) 536-4426 or (720) 685-7864. – Junior Bull Riding Championships (ages 11-15), 4 p.m., North Platte, Neb., (308) 627-8525. September 16 – NCRC Open Show Buckle Series, GSC Arena, Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-5809, (970) 330-1103, http://www.northcoloridingclub.com. – Colo. Stock Horse Open Show, Entry 7:30 a.m., Start 8:30 a.m., Indiana E.C., Arvada, Colo., (303) 232-6756 or (303) 216-010, http://www.coloradostockhorse.com. – Quint Valley CCHA Show & Gymkhana, 9 a.m., Byers Colo., (303) 644-3415. – Johnstown Saddle Club Show, 8 a.m., JSC Arena, Johnstown, Colo., (970) 587-5179 or (970) 566-1084. – Tri County Arena Jackpot Gymkhana, 10 a.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. September 18 – Joe & Kim Andrews Trail Riding Clinic, Loveland, Colo., (970) 613-0121, http://www.MountainMagicRanch.com. – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Ft. Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. September 20 – Rappels Barrel Race Award Series, Pract.-6 p.m., JP- 7:30 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 381-6628, (970) 381-9325 or http://www.canrunevents.com. September 21-23 – Be Line E. C. Dave and Gwynn Weaver Ranch Roping Clinic, Ft. Collins, Colo., (970) 568-3113, http://www.bequickhorseshoeing.com. – Colorado Horse USDF Region 5 and RMDS Championships, Parker, Colo., (719) 573-0398. – Colorado Horse Colors of the Fall, Parker, Colo., (303) 841-5550 ext.15. September 21 – Rappel’s Arena Buckle Roping, Enter-6:30 p.m. Rope -7 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 590-2008. September 22-23 – Cowboy Christian Fellowship Ranch Sort, 9 a.m., O’ Brien’s Arena, Keenesburg, Colo., (303) 424-6636. September 22 – CRGC Gymkhana and Performance, 9 a.m., Fairgrounds, Henderson, Colo., (303) 919-3141, (303) 654-1866. – Junior Bull Riding Championships (ages 11-15), 4 p.m., North Platte, Neb., (308) 627-8525. September 23 – CCHA “Fall Roundup Trail Ride,” (303) 579-4207. September 25 – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Ft. Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. September 27 – Colorado Horse RMDS Breed Show, Parker, Colo., (719) 573-0398. – Rappels Barrel Race Award Series, Pract.-6 p.m., JP- 7:30 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 381-6628, (970) 381-9325 or http://www.canrunevents.com. September 27- October 1 – Jack Brainard Advanced Horsemanship Clinc, Ft. Collins, Colo., Fee, (970) 420-5497 or http://www.jackbrainard.com. September 28-30 – Colorado Horse Shutzhunds, Parker, Colo., (303) 840-7025. September 28 – Rappel’s Arena Buckle Roping, Enter-6:30 p.m. Rope -7 p.m., Gill, Colo., (970) 590-2008. September 29 – RMRR Open Gymkhana/Pleasure & 4D Barrel Race, 9 a.m., Ft. Lupton, Colo., (970) 310-4906, (303) 913-5561 or http://www.Rockymountainrebelriders.homestead.com. – Circle A Jr./Family Rodeo Series, Reg. 3 p.m., Rodeo 4 p.m., Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-0654, dioneluark314@msn.com. – Junior Bull Riding Championships (ages 11-15), 4 p.m., North Platte, Neb., (308) 627-8525. October 2 – Joe & Kim Andrews Trail Riding Clinic, Loveland, Colo., (970) 613-0121, http://www.MountainMagicRanch.com. – CRGC Meeting, 7 p.m., Brighton, Colo., (303) 919-3141, (303) 654-1866. – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Ft. Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. v

Rocky Mountain Calendar of Events 06-10-13

Ag calendar JUNE 28 Longhorn Cattle Drive, 12 p.m., Tejon Street, Colorado Springs, Colo., http://www.ChampionshipRanchRodeo.com. JUNE 29 Equines in Emergencies, 3-7 p.m., Brighton, Colo., (303) 550-7858. Championship Ranch Rodeo, 6:30 p.m., Norris-Penrose Event Center, Colorado Springs, Colo., http://www.ChampionshipRanchRodeo.com.. JULY 19-21 Colorado Independent Cattlegrowers Association Convention, Sterling, Colo., for more information call Madison (719) 740-1552. July 26 Grand Valley Days, 7 p.m., Parachute, Colo., (970) 285-7719. July 26-28 Equine Touch, Raian Kaiser's place, Loveland, Colo., equinetouchinfo@yahoo.com. Community Events June 24 Tiny Trekkers, 10 a.m., Devil's Backbone Open Space, Loveland, Colo., (970) 679-4489. Flat Tops Cowboy Church, 7-8 p.m., Garfield County Fairgrounds, Rifle, Colo., (970) 878-3286. June 28 Take It Outside with Your Commissioner, 8:30 a.m., Devil's Backbone Open Space, Loveland, Colo., registration required at http://www.Larimer.org/NRregistration or (970) 679-4489. Ladies' Car Clinic, 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m., Meineke Car Care Center, Parker, Colo., (303) 840-9630. June 27 Flat Tops Cowboy Church Youth Group, 6-8 p.m., Garfield County Fairgrounds, Rifle, Colo., (970) 878-3286. June 29 Laser Light Therapy Seminar & Demonstration, Denver, Colo., (605) 791-2283. Free Western Dressage Social, 5-7 p.m., Douglas County Indoor Arena, Castle Rock, Colo., http://www.WDACO.org. July 13 Tractor Daze and Touch-a-Truck Swap Meet and Mud Run, 9 a.m., National Agricultural Center & Hall of Fame, Bonner Springs, Kan., (913) 721-1075 or http://www.AgHallOfFame.com. July 20 El Paso County Wagon Train, 7 a.m., Bailey Ranch, Simla, Colo., http://www.ElPasoCountyWagonTrain.org. July 24-28 Arapahoe County Fair, Arapahoe County Fairgrounds, Aurora, Colo., http://www.ArapahoeCountyFair.com. july 27 Second Annual Car Show, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Meineke Car Care Center, Parker, Colo., (303) 840-9630. Laser Light Therapy Seminar & Demonstration, Denver, Colo., (605) 791-2283. ACTHA Trail Challenge and Obstacle Challenge, 8 a.m., Glade Park, Colo., http://www.ACTHA.us. August 7 2nd Annual Chuck Wagon Dinner, 6:30 p.m., Kersey, Colo., tickets on sale now, (970) 302-6676. August 11 Rocky Mountain Music Festival, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Clement Park Amphitheater, Littleton, Colo., (303) 278-7799 or http://www.TheRMMF.com. August 17 Annual Chili Cookoff, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Laramie, Wyo., benefiting BLVFD #4, (307) 721-9097. SePTember 4-8 Meeker Classic Sheepdog Trials, Meeker, Colo., (970) 878-0111 or http://www.MeekerSheepdog.com. september 7 Blacksmith Basics Class, 3-7 p.m., Centennial Village Museum, http://greeleygov.com/Museums/classes.aspx. Native American Pottery, 3-7 p.m., Centennial Village Museum, http://greeleygov.com/Museums/classes.aspx. September 7-8 Salida Fiber Festival, Riverside Park, Salida, Colo., (719) 539-4752 or http://www.SalidaFiberFestival.org. September 21 Vintage Baseball Game, Bee Family Centennial Farm, Ft. Collins, Colo., (970) 482-9168 or http://www.BeeFamilyFarm.org. ❖

Rocky Mountain Horse Events

Horse Events Horse and Rodeo Events are provided weekly as a free service to our readers. If you have any questions or need more information about having an event listed, please call: (970) 686-5691, 1-800-275-5646 or e-mail adietz@thefencepost.com. April 24 – Trail Riding Clinic, Loveland, Colo., (970) 913-0121, http://www.mountainmagicranch.com. – Team Roping Practice, 6 – 10 p.m., Boulder County Fairgrounds, Longmont, Colo., (720) 937-0371, (720) 629-1437. April 25 – Burns Ranch Arena Team Roping Practice Night, 6:30 p.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-0170. – Horseback Day Camp, 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Lucky Star Equine, Fort Collins, Colo., (970) 402-1217. – Summer Horsebackriding Camp, Lucky Star Equine, Fort Collins, Colo., (970) 402-1217. April 26 – Lucky Star Equine Momma (or Daddy) and Me Classes Horseback Riding, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.; 12-1:30 p.m., Fee, Ft. Collins, Colo., (970) 310-1821. April 27 – Burns Ranch Arena URP, 10 a.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-0170. – Burns Ranch Arena Team Roping Jackpot, 7 p.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-0170. – Hearts and Horses Horsemanship Training Clinic, 4 p.m., Loveland, Colo., Fee, (970) 402-1217, luckystarequine@yahoo.com. April 27-29 – Team Penning & Sort, 9 a.m., The Ranch, Loveland, Colo., (970) 897-2621, (970) 231-8951, http://www.ntpc.us. – Major Cattle Company Versatility Ranch Horse Clinic- RMQHA, Cactus Creek, Pueblo, Colo., (719) 263-5540 or (719) 250-2614. – Barnes Kick off at Cactus Creek Roundup, Cactus Creek, Pueblo, Colo., (303) 360-7605, RockyMtnHiQH@intergate.com. April 28 – 4-H, FFA Fitting and Showing clinic, 9 a.m. to Noon, Ranch-Way Pavilion @The Ranch, Loveland, Colo., (970) 482-1661; 1-800-333-7929. – Rockie Mountain Saddle Club Horse Shows, 8 a.m., Folley’s Arena, Wellington, Colo., (970) 484-1233 or (970) 218-5550. – Burns Ranch Arena Open 4D Barrel Race BBR & NBHA, 11 a.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-1577. – Johansen Jr. & Sr. Bullriding Clinic & Open Jackpot, Akron, Colo., (970) 336-6451. – Tri County Arena Team Penning and Sorting, 12 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. – NBHA Colorado Division 02 Races, Ex- 9 a.m., Races- 10 a.m., Lazy M Arena, Brighton, Colo., (303) 536-4426 or (720) 685-7864. – Boulder Valley Riders 4-H Club Open Fun Horse Show, 9 a.m., Boulder County Fairgrounds Indoor Arena, Longmont, Colo., (303) 499-3303. – Northeast Texas Foundation Breeders Quarter Horse Production Sale, Mt. Pleasant, Texas, (903) 884-2905, http://www.horseauctions.com. – Spring and Summer Extravaganza Open Horse Show, 8:30 a.m., Adams County Fairgrounds, Brighton, Colo., (970) 493-4219. – SCHA Saddle Roping and Jackpot 3-D Barrel Race, Walk-A-Mile Arena, Avondale, Colo., (719) 947-3248, http://www.walkamilearena.com. April 28-29 – Colorado Horse Park CHJA Show-High Prairie No More Snow, Parker, Colo., (303) 840-4384. – Jo & Kim Andrews 2 day Trail Ride/Horsemanship Clinic, Loveland, Colo., (970) 613-0121 or http://www.MountainMagicRanch.com. April 29 – RMQHA & NCRC All Novice Show, Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-5809, (970) 330-1103, http://www.northcoloridingclub.com. – St. Vrain Roundup Club Open Show & Gymkhana, 9 a.m., Boulder County Fairgrounds, Longmont, Colo., (303) 652-2729, (303) 776-9521. – Triple D Barrel Racing Jackpot, 11:00 a.m., Triple D Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. – CCHA Show and Gymkhana, 9:00 a.m., Quint Valley Arena, Byers Colo., (303) 644-3415. – St. Brain Riding Club, 9 a.m., Boulder County Fairgrounds Indoor Arena, Longmont, Colo., (970) 535-4197, http://www.BHSAonline.com. – WNSGA Club Lamb and Kid Sale, 1-2 p.m. Viewing, 2-3 p.m. Silent Auction, Scottsbluff County Fairgrounds 4-H Arena, Mitchell, Neb., (308) 641-3658 or http://www.wnsga.com. May 1 – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Triple D Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. May 2 – EPRHA Meeting, 6:30 p.m., Latigo Trails Equestrian Center, Elbert, Colo., (719) 347-2415. – Burns Ranch Arena Team Roping Practice Night, 6:30 p.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-0170. – Barrel Racing Buckle Series, 6:30 p.m., Chambers Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 857-0597. May 3 – Lucky Star Equine Momma (or Daddy) and Me Classes Horseback Riding, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.; 12-1:30 p.m., Fee, Ft. Collins, Colo., (970) 310-1821. – Tri County Arena Team Penning and Sorting, 12 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. May 4-5 – Rocky Mountain Super Race, Norris-Penrose Event Center, Colo. Spgs, Colo., (303) 688-7777, http://www.BarrelRacingNow.com. May 4-6 – 10th Annual Rocky Mountain Super Race, Norris-Penrose Event Center Indoor Arena, Colorado Springs, Colo., (303) 688-7777, Nancy@BarrelRacingNow.com or http://www.BarrelRacingNow.com. May 5 – Barnes “Basics of Horse Care & Ground Work”, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Reg. req., Fee, (303) 646-9855; gjbarnes111@msn.com. or http://www.horsebasics.net. – Be Line Equestrian Center Novice Ranch Roping Practice, 10 a.m- 12 p.m., Fort Collins, Colo., (970) 568-3113, http://www.bequickhorseshoeing.com. – RMRR Open Gymkhana/Pleasure & 4D Barrel Race, 9 a.m., Fort Lupton, Colo., (970) 310-4906, (303) 913-5561 or http://www.Rockymountainrebelriders.homestead.com. – WDS Junior Rodeo, Registration- 3 p.m., Rodeo- 4 p.m., Eaton, Colo., (970) 454-2869. – ADCO 4-H Summer Series Open Horse Show, (Eng., West., Gymkhana), 8 a.m., Adams Cty. Fairgrounds, Henderson, Colo., (303) 877-3247; http://www.colostate.edu/depts/coopext/Adams. – Tri County Arena Team Penning and Sorting, 12 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. – Mile Hi Buckskin Horse Assoc. Buckskin/Palomino Breed show, 8 a.m., Boulder County Fairgrounds Indoor Arena, Longmont, Colo. (719) 687-3280, buckskin5280@aol.com or http://www.MHBHA.com. – Christensen Brothers Ranch Cutting Clinic, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m., Weldona, Colo., (970) 645-2129. – Mountain States Highland Cattle Spring Jackpot and Picnic, 11:00 a.m., (303) 659-4953. May 5-6 – Jo & Kim Andrews Gaited Horse/Trail Riding Clinic, Loveland, Colo., (970) 613-0121 or http://www.MountainMagicRanch.com. May 6 – CRGC Open Gymkhana & Performance Show, 9 a.m., Adams County Fairgrounds, Henderson, Colo., (303) 919-3141, (303) 654-1866. – Burns Ranch Arena Team Roping Jackpot, 11 a.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-0170. – Tri County Arena Practice Team Gymkhana , 12- 4 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. – Mile Hi Buckskin Horse Assoc. Open All Breed and Buckskin show, 8 a.m., Boulder County Fairgrounds Indoor Arena, Longmont, Colo. (719) 687-3280, buckskin5280@aol.com or http://www.MHBHA.com. – Greeley Saddle Club Horse Show/Gymkhana, Judging 8:00 am, Gymkhana 1:30 p.m., Greeley Saddle Club Arena, Greeley, Colo., (970) 353-0190 or (303) 536-4098, http://www.greeleysaddleclub.org. – MHBHA Open All Breed Mile High Kick-off Horse Show, 8 a.m., Boulder County Fairgrounds Indoor Arena, Longmont, Colo., (970) 535-4197, http://www.BHSAonline.com. – Johnstown Saddle Club Gymkhana, 9:00 a.m., JSC Arena, Johnstown, Colo., (970) 587-5179 or (970) 566-1084. May 8 – Jo & Kim Andrews Trail Riding Clinic, Loveland, Colo., (970) 613-0121, http://www.MountainMagicRanch.com. – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Triple D Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. May 9 – Burns Ranch Arena Team Roping Practice Night, 6:30 p.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-0170. – Barrel Racing Buckle Series, 6:30 p.m., Chambers Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 857-0597. May 10 – Lucky Star Equine Momma (or Daddy) and Me Classes Horseback Riding, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.; 12-1:30 p.m., Fee, Ft. Collins, Colo., (970) 310-1821. – Tri County Arena Team Penning and Sorting, 12 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. May 10-13 – Colorado Horse Park Spring Preview H/J, Parker, Colo., (818) 563-3250. May 11-13 – Free Ranch weekend, Horse Works, Thermopolis, Wyo., (887) 807-2367, http://www.ride@horseworkswyoming.com. May 12 – Aurora Horsemen’s Association Horse Show & Gymkhana Series, 8 a.m., Coal Creek Arena, Aurora, Colo., (720) 857-6160, http://www.aurorahorsemens.com. – Kerry Cogburn Reining & Working Cattle Clinic, RSVP 7 days in advance, http://www.kerrycogburnhorses.com, or (970) 568-9022. – Rockie Mountain Saddle Club Horse Shows, 8 a.m., Folley’s Arena, Wellington, Colo., (970) 484-1233 or (970) 218-5550. – WDS Junior Rodeo, Registration- 3 p.m., Rodeo- 4 p.m., Eaton, Colo., (970) 454-2869. – Tri County Arena Team Penning and Sorting, 12 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. – Circle A Arena Junior/Family Rodeo Series, Reg. 3 p.m., Rodeo 4 p.m., Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-0654, dioneluark314@msn.com. – NBHA Colorado Division 02 Races, Ex- 9 a.m., Races- 10 a.m., Lazy M Arena, Brighton, Colo., (303) 536-4426 or (720) 685-7864. – RMQHA- Carol Ellis Barrel Racing Clinic, Berthoud, Colo., (303) 296-1143, http://www.rmqha.com. – Judy Lamb Benefit Barrel Racing, 1 p.m., Chambers Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 857-0597. – Christensen Brothers Ranch Cutting Practice, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m., Weldona, Colo., (970) 645-2129. – Burns Ranch Arena Open 4D Barrel Race BBR & NBHA, 11 a.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-1577. May 13 – Saddle Series Horse Show, 7:30 a.m., Indiana Equestrian Center, Arvada, Colo., (303) 422-1762, http://www.saddleseries.com. – NCRC Open Show Buckle Series, Eng & West, Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-5809, (970) 330-1103, http://www.northcoloridingclub.com. May 15 – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Triple D Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. May 16 – Burns Ranch Arena Team Roping Practice Night, 6:30 p.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-0170. – Barrel Racing Buckle Series, 6:30 p.m., Chambers Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 857-0597. May 17 – Lucky Star Equine Momma (or Daddy) and Me Classes Horseback Riding, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.; 12-1:30 p.m., Fee, Ft. Collins, Colo., (970) 310-1821. – Tri County Arena Team Penning and Sorting, 12 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. May 17-20 – Colorado Horse Park Spring Classic H/J, Parker, Colo., (818) 563-3250. May 18- 21 – Paul Dietz Foundation & Horsemanship Workshops, Larkspur, Colo., (303) 210-3669 or (303) 518-4503, http://www.pauldietzhorsemanship.com. May 19 – CRGC Open Gymkhana & Performance Show, 9 a.m., Adams County Fairgrounds, Henderson, Colo., (303) 919-3141, (303) 654-1866. – Be Line Equestrian Center Novice Ranch Roping Practice, 10 a.m- 12 p.m., Fort Collins, Colo., (970) 568-3113, http://www.bequickhorseshoeing.com. – RMRR Open Gymkhana/Pleasure & 4D Barrel Race, 9 a.m., Fort Lupton, Colo., (970) 310-4906, (303) 913-5561 or http://www.Rockymountainrebelriders.homestead.com. – WDS Junior Rodeo, Registration- 3 p.m., Rodeo- 4 p.m., Eaton, Colo., (970) 454-2869. – Tri County Arena Team Penning and Sorting, 12 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. – Boulder Horse Show Association Open Show, 9 a.m., Boulder County Fairgrounds Indoor Arena, Longmont, Colo., (970) 535-4197, http://www.BHSAonline.com. – Burns Open 4-D Barrel Race NBHA, 12 a.m., Yuma Fair Grounds, Yuma, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-1577 May 20 – NCRC Jackpot & Gymkhana Buckle Series, Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-5809, (970) 330-1103, http://www.northcoloridingclub.com. – Burns Ranch Arena Team Roping Jackpot, 11 a.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-0170. – Tri County Arena Practice Team Gymkhana , 12- 4 p.m., Lafayette, Colo., (303) 926-5154. – Mile Hi Buckskin Horse Assoc. Open All Breed & Buckskin/Palomino Breed show. 8 a.m., Lazy J Bar S Ranch, Loveland, Colo., (303) 690-1382, buckskin5280@aol.com or http://www.MHBHA.com. – Colorado Stock Horse Open Show, Entry 7:30 a.m., Start 8:30 a.m., Indiana Equestrian Center, Arvada, Colo., (303) 232-6756 or (303) 216-010, http://www.coloradostockhorse.com. – CCHA Show and Gymkhana, 9:00 a.m., Quint Valley Arena, Byers Colo., (303) 644-3415. – Johnstown Saddle Club Show, 8:00 a.m., JSC Arena, Johnstown, Colo., (970) 587-5179 or (970) 566-1084. May 22 – Jo & Kim Andrews Trail Riding Clinic, Loveland, Colo., (970) 613-0121, http://www.MountainMagicRanch.com. – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Triple D Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170. May 23 – Burns Ranch Arena Team Roping Practice Night, 6:30 p.m., Akron, Colo., (970) 345-6376 or (970) 554-0170. – Barrel Racing Buckle Series, 6:30 p.m., Chambers Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 857-0597. May 24 – Lucky Star Equine Momma (or Daddy) and Me Classes Horseback Riding, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.; 12-1:30 p.m., Fee, Ft. Collins, Colo., (970) 310-1821. May 26-27 – Cindy Loader Trail Ride Clinic with Obstacles, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m., Sprit Dancer Ranch, Fort Collins, Colo., Fee, (970) 481-9150, clspiritdancer@aol.com. May 26-28 – Barnes C Lazy U Ranch Roundup, Granby, Colo., (970) 726-9709. May 26 – WDS Junior Rodeo, Registration- 3 p.m., Rodeo- 4 p.m., Eaton, Colo., (970) 454-2869. – Circle A Arena Junior/Family Rodeo Series, Reg. 3 p.m., Rodeo 4 p.m., Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-0654, dioneluark314@msn.com. – NBHA Colorado Division 02 Races, Ex- 9 a.m., Races- 10 a.m., Lazy M Arena, Brighton, Colo., (303) 536-4426 or (720) 685-7864. May 27 – NCRC Open Show Buckle Series, Eng & West, Greeley, Colo., (970) 352-5809, (970) 330-1103, http://www.northcoloridingclub.com. – Pony Tracks All Breed Fun Show, 10 a.m., Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Golden, Colo., (303) 778-0100, carrol.terry@performanceaircooling.com. – CCHA Trail Ride, (303) 579-4207. May 28 – Greeley Saddle Club Horse Show/Gymkhana, Judging 8:00 am, Gymkhana 1:30 p.m., Greeley Saddle Club Arena, Greeley, Colo., (970) 353-0190 or (303) 536-4098, http://www.greeleysaddleclub.org. May 29 – Triple D Barrel Racing, 5:30 p.m., Triple D Arena, Fort Lupton, Colo., (303) 718-0268 or (303) 857-2170.

Can’t get enough CFD Rodeo action?

Rodeo season is officially underway in Cheyenne, Wyo. The 110th Cheyenne Frontier Days began when Committee Chairmen, Dandies, and wranglers rounded up 640 Corriente steers and drove them down the Frontage Road along I-25 and into Frontier Park on Sunday, July 16. This is an annual event and onlookers were at all the access points along the route. State Highway Patrol cars were on the Interstate to keep traffic moving. You can imagine what a spectacle this was for unsuspecting tourists passing through on their way home to somewhere points east or west. Media personnel rode in horse-drawn wagons a safe distance ahead of the herd. Also in the wagons, and clearly disappointed at missing out on the fun of being on horseback, was General Committee Chairman, Ken McCann. Rodeo season is officially underway in Cheyenne, Wyo. The 110th Cheyenne Frontier Days began when Committee Chairmen, Dandies, and wranglers rounded up 640 Corriente steers and drove them down the Frontage Road along I-25 and into Frontier Park on Sunday, July 16. This is an annual event and onlookers were at all the access points along the route. State Highway Patrol cars were on the Interstate to keep traffic moving. You can imagine what a spectacle this was for unsuspecting tourists passing through on their way home to somewhere points east or west. Media personnel rode in horse-drawn wagons a safe distance ahead of the herd. Also in the wagons, and clearly disappointed at missing out on the fun of being on horseback, was General Committee Chairman, Ken McCann. Rodeo season is officially underway in Cheyenne, Wyo. The 110th Cheyenne Frontier Days began when Committee Chairmen, Dandies, and wranglers rounded up 640 Corriente steers and drove them down the Frontage Road along I-25 and into Frontier Park on Sunday, July 16. This is an annual event and onlookers were at all the access points along the route. State Highway Patrol cars were on the Interstate to keep traffic moving. You can imagine what a spectacle this was for unsuspecting tourists passing through on their way home to somewhere points east or west. Media personnel rode in horse-drawn wagons a safe distance ahead of the herd. Also in the wagons, and clearly disappointed at missing out on the fun of being on horseback, was General Committee Chairman, Ken McCann. Rodeo season is officially underway in Cheyenne, Wyo. The 110th Cheyenne Frontier Days began when Committee Chairmen, Dandies, and wranglers rounded up 640 Corriente steers and drove them down the Frontage Road along I-25 and into Frontier Park on Sunday, July 16. This is an annual event and onlookers were at all the access points along the route. State Highway Patrol cars were on the Interstate to keep traffic moving. You can imagine what a spectacle this was for unsuspecting tourists passing through on their way home to somewhere points east or west. Media personnel rode in horse-drawn wagons a safe distance ahead of the herd. Also in the wagons, and clearly disappointed at missing out on the fun of being on horseback, was General Committee Chairman, Ken McCann.

Historic Crutch Ranch wins top spot at 2011 Ride for the Brand Ranch Rodeo

Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain.

Historic Crutch Ranch wins top spot at 2011 Ride for the Brand Ranch Rodeo

Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain. Top cowboys from working ranches all over the Southwest gathered in Colorado Springs, Colo., for the Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo. The winning ranch would punch their ticket to the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA) finals in Amarillo, Texas, in November. These are working ranch cowboys competing as a team in events that, for the most part, are exactly what they do every day in their jobs. The equipment is functional and the saddles are what the cowboys sit in every day. There are strict rules to become a qualifying WRCA ranch rodeo and rules regarding who can be a member of the ranch team. The rules are there to insure that ranches are working ranches and team members actually work on the ranch. Having a bronc rider can be a sticking point for a ranch as many ranches no longer have bronc riders on staff. The WRCA has addressed this issue, as well as not having enough staff to field a team, by allowing two ranches to combine to form a team. The Ride for the Brand was limited to 12 teams representing 17 ranches from Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nebraska. They competed in five events for championship points and one event as a ‘jackpot.’ During the Team Branding, calves were roped and dragged to a ‘fire’ and ‘branded’ with chalk. Team Sorting required one rider to enter the herd and sort out a preselected number of animals in order, beginning with a random number. These two events ran at morning Slack and there was no admission charge for these. The four night events were Bronc Riding, Stray Gathering, Wild Cow Milking and Trailer Loading. Bronc Riding is the only event not involving the whole team. The saddle was not specialized, just your everyday ranch saddle. Eight second time, but the ride was “ride as ride can” which translates to ‘whatever works’ and two hands are legal. Gathering strays is something that working cowboys do all the time, so it was only natural that they would turn it into a competitive event. Four team members ride into the arena at one end and two, 600-700 pound, muley yearlings enter at the other end. The object is that a header and heeler for each animal stop the yearling. One or both cowboys dismount (good cowhorses are important members of the team), get the yearling to the ground and hog tie them. You never know what is going to happen in the Wild Cow Milking Event as Daniel Cranson from the Broken Spear Ranch can attest to. Cranson was head butted by a cow and broke his jaw. It might have been a small consolation to Daniel that he was given the Hard Luck Cowboy Award. In Wild Cow Milking, a wet cow is roped by the single mounted cowboy and three team members hold the cow while a fourth milks the cow into a long-necked beer bottle and runs to a circle where the judge will pour the milk out. Only enough milk to pour even a single drop is needed for a time, but no milk, no time. Trailer Loading is a ‘jackpot’ event where a team of four cowboys (two mounted) rope a yearling and put it into a trailer, then load the two horses, and the four cowboys into the cab of the truck. Sounds simple enough, but in the excitement of running against a clock to win money, even the simplest task can go wrong. The Crutch Ranch from Texas won the event and the jackpot money. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was a big success despite the weather. In an area where ranchers were experiencing severe drought, you could almost bet that it would rain the day of the rodeo. The rain did not stop any of the events, including the feed put on after the Chuck Wagon Cook-off. It was a much needed rain and everyone was happy to see it. Bill Miller, General Manager of the Norris-Penrose Event Center, said “We had a great rodeo. Big crowd and a little bit different crown. This has always been a more traditional cowboy crowd, but this year we had a lot of first-timers to Ranch Rodeo.” One of the goals of the WRCA is to promote and preserve the heritage and lifestyle of the Working Ranch Cowboy. The Ride for the Brand and the cowboys did their part by riding along the edge of the arena and stopping to talk to fans after the rodeo. No one was more thrilled about that than 6-year-old twins Cameron and Carter Schillaci and their parents Jason and Deedee. Jason is in the U.S. Army and recently was transferred to Fort Carson from New York. The twins were beside themselves with excitement when real Texas cowboy Clay Igo, from the Triangle/Black team, gave them a short ride on a real cowboy’s horse. “Their friends in New York are going to be so jealous when they hear this.” said Deedee. The 2011 Ride for the Brand was an unqualified success. Everyone had fun, ate some good chuck wagon food, saw a great ranch rodeo, and enjoyed a much needed rain.