Drones to the rescue? Boulder businessmen targeting ag with new technology | TheFencePost.com

Drones to the rescue? Boulder businessmen targeting ag with new technology

Two Boulder businesses are hoping to bring pioneering drone technology to the age-old business of farming — if only federal regulators will let them out of the barn. InventWorks and Boulder Labs have developed a drone they believe could revolutionize the multibillion-dollar business of agriculture, by offering farmers precise location of weeds that require suppression far more efficiently than could be achieved by any other means. To some they are known as unmanned aircraft systems, and to others they are autonomous aerial vehicles, but in headlines they are drones. And for many, anything with that label smacks of lethal military strikes or spying. "In the area of drones, when people are horrified, it's because they assume it's only a military technology, and they say, 'They should be illegal,'" said Tom McKinnon, managing director of InventWorks. "But when you ask should they be available to help out in the search for a missing child, they say, 'Oh, that's a good idea.' As long as the scary stuff is off the table, such as weaponizing drones, generally, the public is in favor of it." Jim Sears, head of new product development at Boulder Labs, added, "The fact that we're in an agricultural application area takes away a lot of the concerns about privacy, which is what a lot of people have. This is not going to threaten people's sense of privacy, and doing a precision drone strike on weeds sounds like a good thing." It's not yet known what the two companies' business model will look like once they can hang out a shingle and charge farmers for their service. Nor have they decided under what business name it will operate. And, to be precise, they are not offering "drone strikes" on weeds. Instead, they are developing a 4-pound, 6-foot-wingspan drone equipped with multispectral cameras that can capture high-resolution, geo-tagged photographs every few seconds. Those images are then transferred to a ground-based computer where they are merged to create a continuous image of a large farming operation. The data is processed into image recognition computer algorithms that can recognize features as precise as individual weeds and tie them to GPS coordinates. By allowing farmers with large acreage to know precisely where the weeds are, they believe farmers can save up to 80 percent per acre on herbicide-based weed suppression. They have tested their product primarily with a farmer whose dryland operation in northern Montana is nearly the size of Manhattan Island. "He simply doesn't have the ability to drive around and look," McKinnon said. "By the time he got done, the weeds would be taking over his crop." The greatest hurdle to InventWorks and Boulder Labs launching their venture is the Federal Aviation Administration, which is under a congressional mandate to incorporate drones into the national airspace by Sept. 30, 2015. There is a long list of business interests eager to see the FAA finalize a regulatory structure. According to the Association for Unmanned Vehicles International, an Arlington, Va.-based trade group, the first three years of drones' introduction into the national air space would see $13.6 billion in economic activity and 34,000 new manufacturing jobs. The FAA has estimated up to 10,000 drones could be airborne in the U.S. within five years. Once the FAA green-lights their broader commercial use, drones could become commonplace over large farms. "Absolutely, agricultural applications are at the top of the list of activities or applications that could immediately benefit from a change in the regulatory process — in part because it's such an obvious application," said Brian Argrow, cofounder of the Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles at the University of Colorado. "You have large expanses of land in which you are trying to make relatively small, precision measurements, typically through some sort of photography or something. It's much more efficient to do that from a relatively low altitude with a small, low-flying aircraft." Under current law, there are two ways to get FAA approval to operate an unmanned aircraft system, or UAS, as the government calls them. One is to obtain an experimental airworthiness certificate. The second is to secure a "certificate of waiver or authorization," which are typically awarded to public entities such as law enforcement (the Mesa County Sheriff's Department has one), CU and other universities, or to governmental operations such as firefighting or border patrol. InventWorks and Boulder Labs have been testing their drone technology under a third umbrella — a "grey area," as McKinnon puts it — flying, essentially, as hobbyists, which is permitted if the aircraft remains under 400 feet and steers clear of airports and crowds on the ground. "Us and thousands others are flying under the recreational exemption," McKinnon said. "Since we're not being paid, we're kind of like hobbyists. The FAA has only told people to stop in a really small number of cases, and that's where people were egregiously flying over crowds." In this time of waiting for new federal regulations to be finalized, McKinnon and Sears continue to fine-tune their product and develop a suite of potential clients, both inside and outside Colorado. "If it was legal today, we would not be ready, so we do need some development time," McKinnon said. "But we won't need two years of development time. We would be easily ready by the 2014 spraying and growing season." The reality is that the federal guidelines may not be completed until just after the 2015 season. "We're going into this expecting to have to wait out two (more) growing seasons without making any money," said McKinnon, admitting that having to do so would be "not great." Argrow, the drone expert at CU, said McKinnon and Sears have plenty of company across the country, with countless entrepreneurs increasingly anxious to put drones to greater commercial use. "This is a very pent-up potential industry," Argrow said. "It has been, for years." ❖

Fall weaning on the Broken Spear Ranch

For Gail and Millie Allen, who own the Broken Spear Ranch near La Junta, Colo., it is the end of one year of raising cattle and the beginning of another. For a cow-calf operation like the Allens, the two run together at the fall weaning. Cows and their calves, which were born in the spring, have to be gathered up and separated. The cows will receive a series of shots, checked for pregnancy, and moved to winter pastures. For the calves, it’s weighing, weaning, and off to the sale barn in La Junta. With the pregnant cows, the whole process begins again to produce next year’s crop. There are several levels to the cattle industry before the finished product reaches the supermarket in the form of beef for consumers. The cow-calf operation is the first step in the process where the rancher runs cows on grass pastures. All beef cattle originate in cow-calf ranches. It is here that the basic raw material of grass is converted to cattle. The Broken Spear Ranch is like many ranches in Colorado in that it is family owned. Expect for an occasional day worker, labor is done by family members. When more people are needed for gathers, brandings, and weanings, neighbors provide the extra manpower. This shared labor pool works out to the benefit of everyone involved. As 91-year-old rancher Lloyd Hall from nearby Delphi, Colo., put it “All the neighbors help each other. You drive 50 miles sometimes to help a neighbor. When you call them, they’ll be there. That’s the best help you can get because they know what to do. You don’t tell them nothing – you don’t need to. Works out the best you ever saw.” So it was early in the morning that Lloyd Hall and his grandson Gary Hall joined Ryan Strieter, Floyd Meyers and Duane Wilson from the nearby Dry Creek Ranch to help the extended Allan family gather up the Broken Spear cattle for weaning. The Broken Spear Ranch is made up of deeded and leased acres and Gail and Millie Allen have operated the ranch for 10 years. Daughters Emily and Missy and son-in-law Jeb Brown rounded out the Allen family workers. The cattle were gathered in two groups in order to put as little stress on them as possible because “Every moment that you are messing with that calf he is shrinking – losing weight” said Allen, “and in the cattle business, you are paid on weight and the bigger the numbers, the more chance you have to lose a lot of pounds.” The process of weaning or “stripping” a calf from a cow is pretty straightforward, but it does require experienced hands on good horses. The cattle are placed into a large holding pen and from this group a smaller group is removed. This small group is separated into calves, cows and heifers. Once the first calf is stripped from its mother, the bawling starts and grows louder as the day progresses. A group of mixed cattle are moved to an alley with pens on each side. Two riders move to the face of the group and other riders position their horses in pen openings to act as “gates.” As the cowboys at the face of the cattle let individual animals pass down the alley, they are directed into or kept out of pens by the “gate” cowboys. The cows are directed back into the large holding pen. This process is repeated over and over until all the animals are sorted. Once all the animals are sorted, the cows are moved in groups to the alley where they are sent to the squeeze chute. There they get inoculations, ear tags, and a pregnancy check by a vet. The non-pregnant or “open” cows are sorted off and will be sent to the sale barn. Allen gets about 10 years of production from a range cow. Those that are sold will have another few years of production if put on a wheat or corn pasture. The cows and the heifers are sent to winter pastures and the calves go to the sale barn and the yearly cycle begins again. The calves are the ranch’s annual cash crop. This is the point where the economics of the marketplace comes into play – the point that can make or break a ranch. Up to now, the cattle have produced no income, only expenses. Whatever the rancher gets for his calves at the sale barn will be his one paycheck for the year. “In any self-owned business you run the risk of losing money,” says Allen, “but only in agriculture can you work a full year and not only not make any money, but it’s very possible you worked that whole year and will lose money.” Allen continued, “The average working man can’t understand this concept. They see the guy that has a ranch or farm and they think he has really arrived. In actuality, there are no guarantees that we are going to work this year and make a profit. We all hope that we can, but we may break even or we may lose money – or we may have a good year and make a lot of money. We never know until we sell our calves in November.” Ranching is certainly not for everyone, and, as Gail Allen puts it, “Not very many people can manage on just getting one check a year.” So why do people do it? One major reason has to be heritage. Ranching skills were learned as a child and it is all they know. An equally compelling reason is they love the work. They love the land and working on it. They love the fact that there are few places that are better to raise a family. It is hard to argue with those reasons. For Gail and Millie Allen, who own the Broken Spear Ranch near La Junta, Colo., it is the end of one year of raising cattle and the beginning of another. For a cow-calf operation like the Allens, the two run together at the fall weaning. Cows and their calves, which were born in the spring, have to be gathered up and separated. The cows will receive a series of shots, checked for pregnancy, and moved to winter pastures. For the calves, it’s weighing, weaning, and off to the sale barn in La Junta. With the pregnant cows, the whole process begins again to produce next year’s crop. There are several levels to the cattle industry before the finished product reaches the supermarket in the form of beef for consumers. The cow-calf operation is the first step in the process where the rancher runs cows on grass pastures. All beef cattle originate in cow-calf ranches. It is here that the basic raw material of grass is converted to cattle. The Broken Spear Ranch is like many ranches in Colorado in that it is family owned. Expect for an occasional day worker, labor is done by family members. When more people are needed for gathers, brandings, and weanings, neighbors provide the extra manpower. This shared labor pool works out to the benefit of everyone involved. As 91-year-old rancher Lloyd Hall from nearby Delphi, Colo., put it “All the neighbors help each other. You drive 50 miles sometimes to help a neighbor. When you call them, they’ll be there. That’s the best help you can get because they know what to do. You don’t tell them nothing – you don’t need to. Works out the best you ever saw.” So it was early in the morning that Lloyd Hall and his grandson Gary Hall joined Ryan Strieter, Floyd Meyers and Duane Wilson from the nearby Dry Creek Ranch to help the extended Allan family gather up the Broken Spear cattle for weaning. The Broken Spear Ranch is made up of deeded and leased acres and Gail and Millie Allen have operated the ranch for 10 years. Daughters Emily and Missy and son-in-law Jeb Brown rounded out the Allen family workers. The cattle were gathered in two groups in order to put as little stress on them as possible because “Every moment that you are messing with that calf he is shrinking – losing weight” said Allen, “and in the cattle business, you are paid on weight and the bigger the numbers, the more chance you have to lose a lot of pounds.” The process of weaning or “stripping” a calf from a cow is pretty straightforward, but it does require experienced hands on good horses. The cattle are placed into a large holding pen and from this group a smaller group is removed. This small group is separated into calves, cows and heifers. Once the first calf is stripped from its mother, the bawling starts and grows louder as the day progresses. A group of mixed cattle are moved to an alley with pens on each side. Two riders move to the face of the group and other riders position their horses in pen openings to act as “gates.” As the cowboys at the face of the cattle let individual animals pass down the alley, they are directed into or kept out of pens by the “gate” cowboys. The cows are directed back into the large holding pen. This process is repeated over and over until all the animals are sorted. Once all the animals are sorted, the cows are moved in groups to the alley where they are sent to the squeeze chute. There they get inoculations, ear tags, and a pregnancy check by a vet. The non-pregnant or “open” cows are sorted off and will be sent to the sale barn. Allen gets about 10 years of production from a range cow. Those that are sold will have another few years of production if put on a wheat or corn pasture. The cows and the heifers are sent to winter pastures and the calves go to the sale barn and the yearly cycle begins again. The calves are the ranch’s annual cash crop. This is the point where the economics of the marketplace comes into play – the point that can make or break a ranch. Up to now, the cattle have produced no income, only expenses. Whatever the rancher gets for his calves at the sale barn will be his one paycheck for the year. “In any self-owned business you run the risk of losing money,” says Allen, “but only in agriculture can you work a full year and not only not make any money, but it’s very possible you worked that whole year and will lose money.” Allen continued, “The average working man can’t understand this concept. They see the guy that has a ranch or farm and they think he has really arrived. In actuality, there are no guarantees that we are going to work this year and make a profit. We all hope that we can, but we may break even or we may lose money – or we may have a good year and make a lot of money. We never know until we sell our calves in November.” Ranching is certainly not for everyone, and, as Gail Allen puts it, “Not very many people can manage on just getting one check a year.” So why do people do it? One major reason has to be heritage. Ranching skills were learned as a child and it is all they know. An equally compelling reason is they love the work. They love the land and working on it. They love the fact that there are few places that are better to raise a family. It is hard to argue with those reasons. For Gail and Millie Allen, who own the Broken Spear Ranch near La Junta, Colo., it is the end of one year of raising cattle and the beginning of another. For a cow-calf operation like the Allens, the two run together at the fall weaning. Cows and their calves, which were born in the spring, have to be gathered up and separated. The cows will receive a series of shots, checked for pregnancy, and moved to winter pastures. For the calves, it’s weighing, weaning, and off to the sale barn in La Junta. With the pregnant cows, the whole process begins again to produce next year’s crop. There are several levels to the cattle industry before the finished product reaches the supermarket in the form of beef for consumers. The cow-calf operation is the first step in the process where the rancher runs cows on grass pastures. All beef cattle originate in cow-calf ranches. It is here that the basic raw material of grass is converted to cattle. The Broken Spear Ranch is like many ranches in Colorado in that it is family owned. Expect for an occasional day worker, labor is done by family members. When more people are needed for gathers, brandings, and weanings, neighbors provide the extra manpower. This shared labor pool works out to the benefit of everyone involved. As 91-year-old rancher Lloyd Hall from nearby Delphi, Colo., put it “All the neighbors help each other. You drive 50 miles sometimes to help a neighbor. When you call them, they’ll be there. That’s the best help you can get because they know what to do. You don’t tell them nothing – you don’t need to. Works out the best you ever saw.” So it was early in the morning that Lloyd Hall and his grandson Gary Hall joined Ryan Strieter, Floyd Meyers and Duane Wilson from the nearby Dry Creek Ranch to help the extended Allan family gather up the Broken Spear cattle for weaning. The Broken Spear Ranch is made up of deeded and leased acres and Gail and Millie Allen have operated the ranch for 10 years. Daughters Emily and Missy and son-in-law Jeb Brown rounded out the Allen family workers. The cattle were gathered in two groups in order to put as little stress on them as possible because “Every moment that you are messing with that calf he is shrinking – losing weight” said Allen, “and in the cattle business, you are paid on weight and the bigger the numbers, the more chance you have to lose a lot of pounds.” The process of weaning or “stripping” a calf from a cow is pretty straightforward, but it does require experienced hands on good horses. The cattle are placed into a large holding pen and from this group a smaller group is removed. This small group is separated into calves, cows and heifers. Once the first calf is stripped from its mother, the bawling starts and grows louder as the day progresses. A group of mixed cattle are moved to an alley with pens on each side. Two riders move to the face of the group and other riders position their horses in pen openings to act as “gates.” As the cowboys at the face of the cattle let individual animals pass down the alley, they are directed into or kept out of pens by the “gate” cowboys. The cows are directed back into the large holding pen. This process is repeated over and over until all the animals are sorted. Once all the animals are sorted, the cows are moved in groups to the alley where they are sent to the squeeze chute. There they get inoculations, ear tags, and a pregnancy check by a vet. The non-pregnant or “open” cows are sorted off and will be sent to the sale barn. Allen gets about 10 years of production from a range cow. Those that are sold will have another few years of production if put on a wheat or corn pasture. The cows and the heifers are sent to winter pastures and the calves go to the sale barn and the yearly cycle begins again. The calves are the ranch’s annual cash crop. This is the point where the economics of the marketplace comes into play – the point that can make or break a ranch. Up to now, the cattle have produced no income, only expenses. Whatever the rancher gets for his calves at the sale barn will be his one paycheck for the year. “In any self-owned business you run the risk of losing money,” says Allen, “but only in agriculture can you work a full year and not only not make any money, but it’s very possible you worked that whole year and will lose money.” Allen continued, “The average working man can’t understand this concept. They see the guy that has a ranch or farm and they think he has really arrived. In actuality, there are no guarantees that we are going to work this year and make a profit. We all hope that we can, but we may break even or we may lose money – or we may have a good year and make a lot of money. We never know until we sell our calves in November.” Ranching is certainly not for everyone, and, as Gail Allen puts it, “Not very many people can manage on just getting one check a year.” So why do people do it? One major reason has to be heritage. Ranching skills were learned as a child and it is all they know. An equally compelling reason is they love the work. They love the land and working on it. They love the fact that there are few places that are better to raise a family. It is hard to argue with those reasons.

Milo Yield: Laugh Tracks in the Dust 6-4-12

A few days ago ol’ Lon G. Horner and I were swapping stories about our long-deceased papas. Lon told me a funny story about his dad that I just have to pass along.  It all happened decades ago when about every adult man carried a book of paper matches in his pocket for all those times when an instant fire wuz needed. Well, on this day Lon’s dad wuz doing some kind of hard work, probably bucking hay bales, that caused a lot of activity around the pockets of his jeans or overalls. All of a sudden, the old man stopped working, started yelling in pain, and simultaneously slapping at his pockets and trying to exodus his pants. Yep, seems the friction of the work somehow ignited the entire book of paper matches in the old guy’s pockets. Lon says his dad escaped with only minor burns – but what really burned him wuz the way his kid had a good laugh at his expense. *** I have a good friend in town who needed a tank of water, so he and his son-in-law took a truck loaded with an empty water tank and drove to a low water bridge where they could pump the tank full from the stream and be on their way. Except for one thing. They forgot about the existence of Murphy’s Law about how if anything can go wrong, it will. Everything went peachy keen until they had the water tank full. When they attempted to turn the rig around in a nearby gate, the driver miscalculated his aim on the gate and plopped the rear wheels of the truck into a steep ditch. That’s when the weight of the water tank took over the enterprise and elevated the cab of the truck into the air – leaving the pair of water pilferers high and dry above the road below. Thanks to the assistance of a passing farmer with a tractor, the truck wuz soon pulled out of the ditch with no damage done except to my friends’ pride. *** Did you hear about the farmer who came into a rural bar and ordered a bloody Mary with an olive. Before drinking it, he removed the olive and carefully put it into a glass jar?  Then he ordered the same drink and did the same thing. After a couple hours, when he was full of drinks and the jar was full of olives, he staggered out. “Well,” said a customer, “I never saw anything as peculiar as that!” “What’s so peculiar about it?” the bartender said. “Ol’ Joe does that every time his wife sends him out for a jar of olives.” *** Thanks to an Oklahoma reader for this story. There comes a time when a woman just has to trust her husband.  A middle-aged farm wife comes home late at night from a church meeting and quietly opens the door to her bedroom. From under the blanket she sees four legs instead of two. Enraged, she picks up her husband’s wooden walking cane and pounds the blanket as hard as she can about 10 times. Once she’s done, she goes to the kitchen to cool her temper, but as she passes the living room, she’s startled to see her husband there watching the Leno show on TV. “Hi, hon,” he says, “I see you made it home OK. I know you’ll be pleasantly surprised that your parents came for an unannounced visit, so l let them stay in our bedroom. Did you say ‘hello’?” *** And from central Kansas comes this one. One day a feed salesman stopped by the Yoder farm and knocked. Mrs. Yoder came to the door and the salesman asked politely, “Is your husband home, ma’am?”  “Sure is,” she replied. “He’s over in the cow barn.” “That’s good, I’ve got some excellent new feed to show him. Will I have any difficulty finding him?” “Shouldn’t have any difficulties,” Mrs. Yoder said. “He’s the one with the beard.” *** I’m writing this a few days before Memorial Day and going to quit now to do a sobering little privilege of putting out the American flags in the local Hillside Cemetery. It’s sobering because it makes me stop and really appreciate all the sacrifices of the military folks buried there. I hope you had a similar appreciation on Memorial Day. *** Well, it’s time to shut my brain and fingers down for the week, so I’ll close with a few words of wisdom about beards from Minnie Pearl, the famous Grand Ol’ Opry comedienne. She said: “Kissing a man with a beard is a lot like going to a picnic. You don’t mind going through the bushes to get there!”  Have a good ‘un.

Water Update: Snowpack in S. Platte basin at 311 percent of average; runoff may have peaked early

A new report shows that snowpack in the South Platte on June 1 was at 311 percent of its historic average for that date, narrowly putting it behind the mark set in 2011, which is widely referred to as one of the best-ever snowpack years for the area. On June 1, 2011, snowpack was at 313 percent of historic average — farther ahead of normal than any other date on record in the South Platte basin. The Natural Resources Conservation Service's snowpack data — consisting of reports that collect data for the first day of winter and spring months — date back to 1968, although its Jan. 1 reports for the South Platte Basin only go back to 1985, and its June 1 reports only date back to 1986. While data is somewhat limited, there's no doubting there's a lot of snow in the South Platte mountains right now. Because of that large snowpack, along with recent heavy rains, there's been some flooding in the area, particularly along the Poudre River. As far as the potential for more flooding, water experts say river flows in the area are trending down, doing so earlier than normal, and if there is any more flooding, it will be caused by rains — not necessarily by how much melting snow is coming down from the mountains. Dave Nettles, the Colorado Division of Water Resources Division 1 engineer, based in Greeley, explained that, in general, this year's apparent peak runoff for snowmelt up in the mountains came at about May 31 — roughly 10 days earlier than normal. Flows in the Poudre River peaked on May 31, flowing at about 6,000 cubic feet per second (the historic average is about 1,600 cfs for that date), and had fallen to about 4,300 cfs by Thursday afternoon (the historic average for June 5 is about 1,800 cfs). Similar to the Poudre, the Big Thompson River above Lake Estes peaked on May 31 as well, flowing at about 1,350 cfs (the historic average for that date is about 440 cfs), and had fallen to 815 cfs by Thursday afternoon (the historic average for June 5 is about 520 cfs). "Depending on what the weather does, we may have seen the rivers get as high as they're going to get," Nettles said. "But as full as the rivers already are … and as saturated as the ground is … it won't take much rain to make them rise again." In addition to large snowpack, reservoirs in the South Platte Basin remain full. Reservoir levels in the South Platte basin on June 1 were collectively at 113 percent of the historic average for that date, up slightly from the May 1 report this year, when they were 110 percent of historic average. Minus the flooding in some areas, it's continued good news for water users in the region. Snowpack and reservoir measures have been at normal levels, or better, all year. A healthy water supply is vital for Colorado's agriculture industry which, according to the Colorado Division of Water Resources, uses about 85 percent of the state's water. And it's especially critical for northeast Colorado, where the bulk of the state's production takes place, including Weld County, where the ag industry's market value is $1.86 billion annually, ranking ninth nationally. In addition to being good for northeast Colorado, the NRCS report showed that water supplies are in good shape across much of the state. The Colorado River Basin had similar numbers to those of the South Platte basin. Snowpack for the Colorado basin stood at 223 percent of average on May 1, while reservoir levels were at 95 percent of average. Statewide, snowpack is at 197 percent of normal, and reservoirs are filled at 95 percent of normal. Some Rebound In Other Parts of Colorado, Getting Worse in Others While snowpack measurements throughout the year have shown conditions across the southern mountains tracking at average or below normal, some areas saw improvement during May. The Arkansas Basin snowpack went from 99 percent of average on May 1, up to 132 percent of average on June 1, although reservoir levels remained about the same as the month before — filled to levels at 66 percent of average. The Gunnison Basin snowpack went from 97 percent of average on May 1, up to 158 percent of average on June 1, but likewise, reservoir levels remained about the same as the month before — filled to levels at 109 percent of average. But things are getting worse in the Rio Grande River Basin and the combined San Juan, Animas, Dolores and San Miguel river basins. The Rio Grande Basin snowpack dropped from 50 percent of average on May 1, down to 39 percent of average on June 1, while reservoir levels remained about the same as the month before — filled to levels at 66 percent of average. The combined San Juan, Animas, Dolores and San Miguel river basins dropped from 68 percent of average on May 1, down to 59 percent of average on June 1, while reservoir levels improved slightly from the month before — filled to levels at 89 percent of average. ❖

Lisa Hamblen Hood: Through the Fence 10-10-11

I think all women dream of being able to set our own schedules. What a luxury that would be! Not only the planning of time but the actual execution of the appointments on our calendar. Instead, our hair appointments, girls’ night out or even afternoon naps frequently have to be postponed, cancelled or rescheduled because our husbands, kids, parents or animals have some crisis that comes up. It’s like the sign my brother in law’s barn, “Let me just drop everything and tend to you!” Like most school teachers, my friend Sarah’s life is a blur of planning, teaching, grading papers and dealing with students during the day, only to come home at night and start her second job as mother, tutor, housekeeper and ranch hand. Her husband usually stays busy farming and working animals. Free time is rare, but last weekend offered a promise of some much needed relaxation. After her family came in at midnight after a local ranch rodeo, they fell asleep before their heads hit the pillow. They were looking forward to sleeping late and having some “down time” for once. But with a simple flip of a switch, their plans changed drastically. They awoke to what she called, “a stroke inducing mess” Sunday morning. When her husband got up he heard the auger banging away. When he went out, he discovered that their sheep had rubbed against the control sometime during the night. The entire contents of their feed bin had been dumped on a rough patch of gravel that would soon become a road to their pond. About 70 sheep were milling aimlessly through the pile and making an even messier mess. “I saw them playing ring-around-the rosy over there the other day,” her husband later admitted. He certainly didn’t envision the possibility of such disaster when he’d installed a switch low enough for their 5-year-old son to reach. With about 7,000 pounds of feed on the ground, there was no time for speculation or laying of blame. It would take a good part of their “free day” to get it all picked up and redistributed. First, Sarah and her husband attached the front end loader to the tractor and started scooping up feed. They filled both the creep feeders at their house and went out to the pasture and brought two more back and filled them as well. All the while their children, five year old Garrett and 15-year-old Sidney sat on the ground sifting through the feed and picking out the rocks as best they could. To clean up the final dregs, they brought up some panels and fenced off the area and turned the sheep into the enclosure. They would pick through the rocks and debris to get every little piece. “At least it won’t get rained on,” Sarah said, trying to be optimistic. Of course saying that is like washing the car or watering the lawn, it spawns unforecasted thunderstorms. But during the worst recorded drought in the state’s history, no one’s going to complain about rain under any circumstances. She’d rather have a little wet feed than no rain. Even though that was not the day she’d anticipated, Sarah told me later, it actually turned into a fun family day with everyone working together to achieve a common goal. That’s always a good day whether it’s planned or not.

2009 COLORADO FARM SHOW SCHEDULE

2009 AG SPOTLIGHT Event Center Room A 10-11a.m. The Farm Bill: Implications for Colorado Agriculture Dawn Thilmany McFadden, Professor & Extension Economist, CSU There are several titles to the Farm Bill, all of which impact parts of the diverse Colorado agricultural economy. This presentation will briefly summarize some of the major titles and new programs introduced in the Farm Bill with particular focus on how it is expected to influence the decisions and choices of Colorado’s farms and ranches. 11a.m.-12p.m. Legislative View of the Farm Bill Renny Fagan, State Director, Office of Senator Ken Salazar Renny Fagen will discuss the Farm Bill from a legislative prospective. He will outline the changes from the past Farm Bill and discuss the future direction of Farm Bill legislation. This is a time to ask about proposed directions of future Farm Bills. This will be a great opportunity to learn about how Congress looks at future trends and policies that may affect risk management ideas of farm operations in the future. 12-1p.m. LUNCH BREAK 1:15-2p.m. Alternative Energy Raphael Shay, Community Sustainability Manager, iCAST Raphael will present information on Bio-diesel and vegetable oil as alternative fuels options. iCAST has worked to produce the Seeds to Diesel Program that demonstrates a small scale working system that produces bio-diesel from oil seed crops. iCAST works with many forms of alternative energy formats including: bio-diesel, solar, wind, and methane. This presentation will give a good overview of alternative energy sources for farmers. 2-3 p.m. Wind Energy for the Farmstead Tony Frank, Director of Renewable Development, Rocky Mountain Farmers Union Tony will present information on capturing wind energy to power the farmstead. He will also discuss options that farmers have to reduce costs and power the farmstead. In addition, this presentation will provide an overview of small wind technology ranging from 1 KW to 100 KW in size. Information provided will include resources for assessment, economic incentives, manufacturers, and installers. 2009 BEEF DAY Event Center Room C 10-10:10 a.m. Welcome and Opening Comments Mike Jarosz, Weld County Livestock Agent, CSU Extension Feed Efficiency: 10:15-11 a.m. The Big Picture of Feed Efficiency (Importance, Trends, and Future Direction). Dr. Denny Crews, Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences Dr. Crews will discuss how the beef industry, in the past, has focused on selecting for output traits such as growth ” but little attention has been placed on inputs such as intake and efficiency. Now with high feed costs the industry is driven to improve efficiency and is measuring feed intake the answer to improvement? Dr. Crews will define Residual Feed Intake (RFI) as a selection trait for efficiency describing the methods to measure and any implications of selecting for RFI. He will point out how to accurately select for efficiency and make strides the industry needs to test numerous animals and implement other tools such as genetic markers. 11:05-11:50 a.m. Fitting Feed Efficiency into the Beef Profit Equation. Dr. Gordon Carstens, Associate Professor, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M University Dr. Carstens will characterize the use of Residual Feed Intake (RFI) in growing and finishing cattle and describe why RFI is a better efficiency trait than feed to gain ratio. He will comment on if RFI is a “real” efficiency measure that can be linked to biological processes in the animal. Dr. Carstens will discuss if RFI selection can improve profitability to the cow/calf producer and if selecting for RFI will negatively affect reproduction, growth, carcass performance, or meat quality. He will wrap-up with discussing if other traits such as eating behavior (meals/day, etc.) are predictive of RFI and ultimately efficiency. LUNCH BREAK 11:55 – 12:55 p.m. Marketing: 1-1:45 p.m. Receiving Rewards for Paperwork Kevin Miller, Herd Manager, Croissant Red Angus Kevin will address how beef producers can reap financial rewards from simple paperwork. He will give example of what they do on their operation following cattle from birth through harvest and every step along the way. Plus, Kevin will discuss how Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) is being implemented and ways producers can capitalize on this initiative 1:50-2:25 p.m. Starting a Producer Calf Marketing COOP Dean Oatman, Las Animas County Agriculture, Livestock, & 4-H Agent, CSU Extension In his area, Dean is organizing a group of cow/calf producers bringing their calves together to market in larger groups of like calves to improve marketability and potential profitability. Dean will discuss their approach and the ideas that they are using for the marketing group to be successful. 2:30-3 p.m. Producer experience of a Calf Marketing COOP Larry Hoozee, Cow/calf Operation Owner – Stoneham, Colo. Larry will discuss, from a producer perspective, his experience being involved with a calf marketing group. He will address why the group formed, what went well, what challenges the group faced, and if he believes he received a premium for his calves due to the group. 2009 EQUINE DAY Grasslands/Pawnee Buttes Room 8:30-10 a.m. Preparing for the Use of Frozen Stallion Semen Trace Linnebur, Owner, Genetic Innovations, LLC – Deer Trail, CO Trace will conduct a discussion/laboratory session in which several topics will be addressed including an overview of the semen freezing process, normal and abnormal sperm cell motility and morphology, and the importance of good semen quality. The proper way to receive a frozen semen shipment will be presented, as well as techniques for thawing and preparing semen for AI use. 10 a.m.-Noon Angular Limb Deformities and Developmental Tendon Disorders Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO It is not unusual for a foal to be born with an angular limb deformity (crooked legs) or a developmental tendon disorder (knuckling forward or contracted tendons). Some of these deformities will self correct, while some will not. Dr. Jergens will discuss all of these conditions. She will explain which conditions correct, the conditions that won’t correct, and when to take action! She will discuss conservative and surgical treatments of these problems. 12-1 p.m. LUNCH BREAK 1-4 p.m. Tendon Injuries and Their Management Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO Tendon and ligament injuries are a significant cause of lameness in the equine athlete. Racing, jumping, endurance, or barrel racing predispose horses to these types of injuries. Horses of all breeds and uses, including the backyard or light use horse, can also injure these structures. Dr. Jergens will discuss tendon and ligament injuries, their diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. She will demonstrate effective rehabilitation techniques in a hands-on lab following the lecture. Thursday January 29 PARTNERS IN AG Event Center Room A 9 -10a.m. Using Soil Testing to Evaluate Soil Quality Jim Self, Director, CSU Soil, Water, and Plant Testing Laboratory – Ft. Collins, CO The use of soil testing is an effective way to determine the productivity and quality of the soil. Although a soil’s appearance can give an idea of its structure or texture, it cannot give a true indication of the nutrient content, salt level, or metal concentrations in the soil. A soil test provides the information to make informed decisions on how to manage the soil for enhanced productivity, make better use of resources, and obtain greater financial returns. 10:30-11:30a.m. Grass, Water, and Energy – How Do They Fit? Don Hijar, Owner/Manager, Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc.-Greeley, CO Everyone knows there’s a lot of work to be done when you start to grow any crop; plowing, disc work, and adding chemicals are a few of the expenses a farmer experiences. It also takes a large amount of energy and time to get a good crop established from year to year. But, if you plant grass rather than a conventional crop, your energy expenditure establishing a pasture will be cut down tremendously. As costs continue to rise and access to water gets tighter, planting the correct kind of grass can reduce your materials, energy, and irrigation expenses overall. Don will discuss the benefits of growing native grasses in a different manner than most conventional methods. 11:30-1:00 LUNCH BREAK 1-2p.m. Organic Fertilizers and Soil Amendments Jim Holland, Owner, Unlimited Expectations-Denver, CO Organic fertilizers and soil amendments to be used are usually dependent on the information determined by the area soil test. The soil should always be tested prior to using any materials to prevent worsening the soil. After the determination has been made, it will be necessary to decide what the purpose of the area will be used for because any growing material is considered to be a crop. http://www.unlimited_expectations.com HAY AND FORAGE Exhibition Room 10-11a.m. National Alfalfa and Forage Alliance Update Rod Christensen, Executive Secretary, National Alfalfa & Forage Alliance – Kennewick, WA Rod will be giving an update on NAFA activities and will explain how the organization operates and what the organization’s goals are. He will also be reporting on the current status of the re-deregulation efforts in the biotechnology industry. In addition, Rod will also share some of NAFA’s efforts in trying to bring various parties together to develop co-existence strategies. 11a.m. to Noon Carbon Credits: A New Source for Farming Revenue Lowell Messman, Aggregation Specialist, AgraGate Climate Credits Corporation – West Des Moines, IA Farm and ranch operators interested in learning more about opportunities in the market for carbon credits from their hay and forage crops and other land should plan to attend this one hour presentation. Lowell will discuss how the emerging carbon credits market is a new revenue opportunity for farm and ranch operators. He will give participants an understanding of the sign-up process so they can enroll their credits and begin to generate an additional return from their investment in conservation practices. Eligible practices include no-till and strip-till cropping, new forage plantings, sustainably managed rangeland, and methane destruction from livestock manure lagoons. 12-1p.m. LUNCH BREAK 1-2p.m. Strip-Tillage is Beyond a Tool-A Systems Approach to Better Soil Management Michael Petersen, Precision Tillage Agronomist, Orthman Manufacturing Inc. – Lexington, NE David Zimmerer, Sales Manager, Schlagel Manufacturing – Torrington, WY Tillage work has been wrongly presented as a beginning to a destructive end. With soils that have undergone intense tillage for the past 90-100 years for row crop production, the advocates of the quality conservation tillage approach have given a one bullet approach to recovery – Direct Seeding only. Utilizing a residue management program, vertical tillage in a specific zone, calculated and targeted fertilization program within the same zone as the tillage, we are able to improve soil quality within 3 years that benefits a farmer’s management system to improve yields, better control of inputs, wiser use of the grower’s time, and resources. In this presentation we will cover the systems approach to strip-tillage, benefits to soil characteristics that have been measured, and discuss fertilization management techniques that are cutting edge for growers to consider. SPANISH EDUCATION Grassland/Pawnee Butte Room 10a.m.-12p.m. Dairy Cow Well-Being: Identifying and Managing Cows at Risk of Becoming Downers Dr. Noa Roman-Muniz, Extension Dairy Specialist/Assistant Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences-Ft. Collins, CO In order to achieve our goal of assuring animal well-being and preventing cattle from becoming downers on the dairy farm, trailer or sale barn, we must become better observers and understand what animals are at risk of becoming non-ambulatory. The key is to identify animals at risk earlier on and deciding in a timely manner how to manage that animal. Should we treat the disease, cull, or euthanize on the farm? We will discuss the impact that management decisions could have on animal well-being, public safety, and public perception. Bienestar de vacas lecheras: identificando y manejando vacas a riesgo de caerse Para alcanzar la meta de asegurar el bienestar animal y prevenir que las vacas se caigan en la lecheria, durante el transporte o en la venta, necesitamos convertirnos en mejores observadores y entender que animales estan en riesgo de caerse y permanecer postrados. La clave es identificar a los animales en riesgo pronto y tomar una decision respecto a como manejarlos. ¿Debemos tratar la enfermedad, venderlos o administrar eutanasia en la lecheria? Discutiremos el impacto que las decisiones de manejo pueden tener en el bienestar animal, la salud publica y la percepcion del publico. v 2009 AG SPOTLIGHT Event Center Room A 10-11a.m. The Farm Bill: Implications for Colorado Agriculture Dawn Thilmany McFadden, Professor & Extension Economist, CSU There are several titles to the Farm Bill, all of which impact parts of the diverse Colorado agricultural economy. This presentation will briefly summarize some of the major titles and new programs introduced in the Farm Bill with particular focus on how it is expected to influence the decisions and choices of Colorado’s farms and ranches. 11a.m.-12p.m. Legislative View of the Farm Bill Renny Fagan, State Director, Office of Senator Ken Salazar Renny Fagen will discuss the Farm Bill from a legislative prospective. He will outline the changes from the past Farm Bill and discuss the future direction of Farm Bill legislation. This is a time to ask about proposed directions of future Farm Bills. This will be a great opportunity to learn about how Congress looks at future trends and policies that may affect risk management ideas of farm operations in the future. 12-1p.m. LUNCH BREAK 1:15-2p.m. Alternative Energy Raphael Shay, Community Sustainability Manager, iCAST Raphael will present information on Bio-diesel and vegetable oil as alternative fuels options. iCAST has worked to produce the Seeds to Diesel Program that demonstrates a small scale working system that produces bio-diesel from oil seed crops. iCAST works with many forms of alternative energy formats including: bio-diesel, solar, wind, and methane. This presentation will give a good overview of alternative energy sources for farmers. 2-3 p.m. Wind Energy for the Farmstead Tony Frank, Director of Renewable Development, Rocky Mountain Farmers Union Tony will present information on capturing wind energy to power the farmstead. He will also discuss options that farmers have to reduce costs and power the farmstead. In addition, this presentation will provide an overview of small wind technology ranging from 1 KW to 100 KW in size. Information provided will include resources for assessment, economic incentives, manufacturers, and installers. 2009 BEEF DAY Event Center Room C 10-10:10 a.m. Welcome and Opening Comments Mike Jarosz, Weld County Livestock Agent, CSU Extension Feed Efficiency: 10:15-11 a.m. The Big Picture of Feed Efficiency (Importance, Trends, and Future Direction). Dr. Denny Crews, Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences Dr. Crews will discuss how the beef industry, in the past, has focused on selecting for output traits such as growth ” but little attention has been placed on inputs such as intake and efficiency. Now with high feed costs the industry is driven to improve efficiency and is measuring feed intake the answer to improvement? Dr. Crews will define Residual Feed Intake (RFI) as a selection trait for efficiency describing the methods to measure and any implications of selecting for RFI. He will point out how to accurately select for efficiency and make strides the industry needs to test numerous animals and implement other tools such as genetic markers. 11:05-11:50 a.m. Fitting Feed Efficiency into the Beef Profit Equation. Dr. Gordon Carstens, Associate Professor, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M University Dr. Carstens will characterize the use of Residual Feed Intake (RFI) in growing and finishing cattle and describe why RFI is a better efficiency trait than feed to gain ratio. He will comment on if RFI is a “real” efficiency measure that can be linked to biological processes in the animal. Dr. Carstens will discuss if RFI selection can improve profitability to the cow/calf producer and if selecting for RFI will negatively affect reproduction, growth, carcass performance, or meat quality. He will wrap-up with discussing if other traits such as eating behavior (meals/day, etc.) are predictive of RFI and ultimately efficiency. LUNCH BREAK 11:55 – 12:55 p.m. Marketing: 1-1:45 p.m. Receiving Rewards for Paperwork Kevin Miller, Herd Manager, Croissant Red Angus Kevin will address how beef producers can reap financial rewards from simple paperwork. He will give example of what they do on their operation following cattle from birth through harvest and every step along the way. Plus, Kevin will discuss how Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) is being implemented and ways producers can capitalize on this initiative 1:50-2:25 p.m. Starting a Producer Calf Marketing COOP Dean Oatman, Las Animas County Agriculture, Livestock, & 4-H Agent, CSU Extension In his area, Dean is organizing a group of cow/calf producers bringing their calves together to market in larger groups of like calves to improve marketability and potential profitability. Dean will discuss their approach and the ideas that they are using for the marketing group to be successful. 2:30-3 p.m. Producer experience of a Calf Marketing COOP Larry Hoozee, Cow/calf Operation Owner – Stoneham, Colo. Larry will discuss, from a producer perspective, his experience being involved with a calf marketing group. He will address why the group formed, what went well, what challenges the group faced, and if he believes he received a premium for his calves due to the group. 2009 EQUINE DAY Grasslands/Pawnee Buttes Room 8:30-10 a.m. Preparing for the Use of Frozen Stallion Semen Trace Linnebur, Owner, Genetic Innovations, LLC – Deer Trail, CO Trace will conduct a discussion/laboratory session in which several topics will be addressed including an overview of the semen freezing process, normal and abnormal sperm cell motility and morphology, and the importance of good semen quality. The proper way to receive a frozen semen shipment will be presented, as well as techniques for thawing and preparing semen for AI use. 10 a.m.-Noon Angular Limb Deformities and Developmental Tendon Disorders Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO It is not unusual for a foal to be born with an angular limb deformity (crooked legs) or a developmental tendon disorder (knuckling forward or contracted tendons). Some of these deformities will self correct, while some will not. Dr. Jergens will discuss all of these conditions. She will explain which conditions correct, the conditions that won’t correct, and when to take action! She will discuss conservative and surgical treatments of these problems. 12-1 p.m. LUNCH BREAK 1-4 p.m. Tendon Injuries and Their Management Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO Tendon and ligament injuries are a significant cause of lameness in the equine athlete. Racing, jumping, endurance, or barrel racing predispose horses to these types of injuries. Horses of all breeds and uses, including the backyard or light use horse, can also injure these structures. Dr. Jergens will discuss tendon and ligament injuries, their diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. She will demonstrate effective rehabilitation techniques in a hands-on lab following the lecture. Thursday January 29 PARTNERS IN AG Event Center Room A 9 -10a.m. Using Soil Testing to Evaluate Soil Quality Jim Self, Director, CSU Soil, Water, and Plant Testing Laboratory – Ft. Collins, CO The use of soil testing is an effective way to determine the productivity and quality of the soil. Although a soil’s appearance can give an idea of its structure or texture, it cannot give a true indication of the nutrient content, salt level, or metal concentrations in the soil. A soil test provides the information to make informed decisions on how to manage the soil for enhanced productivity, make better use of resources, and obtain greater financial returns. 10:30-11:30a.m. Grass, Water, and Energy – How Do They Fit? Don Hijar, Owner/Manager, Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc.-Greeley, CO Everyone knows there’s a lot of work to be done when you start to grow any crop; plowing, disc work, and adding chemicals are a few of the expenses a farmer experiences. It also takes a large amount of energy and time to get a good crop established from year to year. But, if you plant grass rather than a conventional crop, your energy expenditure establishing a pasture will be cut down tremendously. As costs continue to rise and access to water gets tighter, planting the correct kind of grass can reduce your materials, energy, and irrigation expenses overall. Don will discuss the benefits of growing native grasses in a different manner than most conventional methods. 11:30-1:00 LUNCH BREAK 1-2p.m. Organic Fertilizers and Soil Amendments Jim Holland, Owner, Unlimited Expectations-Denver, CO Organic fertilizers and soil amendments to be used are usually dependent on the information determined by the area soil test. The soil should always be tested prior to using any materials to prevent worsening the soil. After the determination has been made, it will be necessary to decide what the purpose of the area will be used for because any growing material is considered to be a crop. http://www.unlimited_expectations.com HAY AND FORAGE Exhibition Room 10-11a.m. National Alfalfa and Forage Alliance Update Rod Christensen, Executive Secretary, National Alfalfa & Forage Alliance – Kennewick, WA Rod will be giving an update on NAFA activities and will explain how the organization operates and what the organization’s goals are. He will also be reporting on the current status of the re-deregulation efforts in the biotechnology industry. In addition, Rod will also share some of NAFA’s efforts in trying to bring various parties together to develop co-existence strategies. 11a.m. to Noon Carbon Credits: A New Source for Farming Revenue Lowell Messman, Aggregation Specialist, AgraGate Climate Credits Corporation – West Des Moines, IA Farm and ranch operators interested in learning more about opportunities in the market for carbon credits from their hay and forage crops and other land should plan to attend this one hour presentation. Lowell will discuss how the emerging carbon credits market is a new revenue opportunity for farm and ranch operators. He will give participants an understanding of the sign-up process so they can enroll their credits and begin to generate an additional return from their investment in conservation practices. Eligible practices include no-till and strip-till cropping, new forage plantings, sustainably managed rangeland, and methane destruction from livestock manure lagoons. 12-1p.m. LUNCH BREAK 1-2p.m. Strip-Tillage is Beyond a Tool-A Systems Approach to Better Soil Management Michael Petersen, Precision Tillage Agronomist, Orthman Manufacturing Inc. – Lexington, NE David Zimmerer, Sales Manager, Schlagel Manufacturing – Torrington, WY Tillage work has been wrongly presented as a beginning to a destructive end. With soils that have undergone intense tillage for the past 90-100 years for row crop production, the advocates of the quality conservation tillage approach have given a one bullet approach to recovery – Direct Seeding only. Utilizing a residue management program, vertical tillage in a specific zone, calculated and targeted fertilization program within the same zone as the tillage, we are able to improve soil quality within 3 years that benefits a farmer’s management system to improve yields, better control of inputs, wiser use of the grower’s time, and resources. In this presentation we will cover the systems approach to strip-tillage, benefits to soil characteristics that have been measured, and discuss fertilization management techniques that are cutting edge for growers to consider. SPANISH EDUCATION Grassland/Pawnee Butte Room 10a.m.-12p.m. Dairy Cow Well-Being: Identifying and Managing Cows at Risk of Becoming Downers Dr. Noa Roman-Muniz, Extension Dairy Specialist/Assistant Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences-Ft. Collins, CO In order to achieve our goal of assuring animal well-being and preventing cattle from becoming downers on the dairy farm, trailer or sale barn, we must become better observers and understand what animals are at risk of becoming non-ambulatory. The key is to identify animals at risk earlier on and deciding in a timely manner how to manage that animal. Should we treat the disease, cull, or euthanize on the farm? We will discuss the impact that management decisions could have on animal well-being, public safety, and public perception. Bienestar de vacas lecheras: identificando y manejando vacas a riesgo de caerse Para alcanzar la meta de asegurar el bienestar animal y prevenir que las vacas se caigan en la lecheria, durante el transporte o en la venta, necesitamos convertirnos en mejores observadores y entender que animales estan en riesgo de caerse y permanecer postrados. La clave es identificar a los animales en riesgo pronto y tomar una decision respecto a como manejarlos. ¿Debemos tratar la enfermedad, venderlos o administrar eutanasia en la lecheria? Discutiremos el impacto que las decisiones de manejo pueden tener en el bienestar animal, la salud publica y la percepcion del publico. v 2009 AG SPOTLIGHT Event Center Room A 10-11a.m. The Farm Bill: Implications for Colorado Agriculture Dawn Thilmany McFadden, Professor & Extension Economist, CSU There are several titles to the Farm Bill, all of which impact parts of the diverse Colorado agricultural economy. This presentation will briefly summarize some of the major titles and new programs introduced in the Farm Bill with particular focus on how it is expected to influence the decisions and choices of Colorado’s farms and ranches. 11a.m.-12p.m. Legislative View of the Farm Bill Renny Fagan, State Director, Office of Senator Ken Salazar Renny Fagen will discuss the Farm Bill from a legislative prospective. He will outline the changes from the past Farm Bill and discuss the future direction of Farm Bill legislation. This is a time to ask about proposed directions of future Farm Bills. This will be a great opportunity to learn about how Congress looks at future trends and policies that may affect risk management ideas of farm operations in the future. 12-1p.m. LUNCH BREAK 1:15-2p.m. Alternative Energy Raphael Shay, Community Sustainability Manager, iCAST Raphael will present information on Bio-diesel and vegetable oil as alternative fuels options. iCAST has worked to produce the Seeds to Diesel Program that demonstrates a small scale working system that produces bio-diesel from oil seed crops. iCAST works with many forms of alternative energy formats including: bio-diesel, solar, wind, and methane. This presentation will give a good overview of alternative energy sources for farmers. 2-3 p.m. Wind Energy for the Farmstead Tony Frank, Director of Renewable Development, Rocky Mountain Farmers Union Tony will present information on capturing wind energy to power the farmstead. He will also discuss options that farmers have to reduce costs and power the farmstead. In addition, this presentation will provide an overview of small wind technology ranging from 1 KW to 100 KW in size. Information provided will include resources for assessment, economic incentives, manufacturers, and installers. 2009 BEEF DAY Event Center Room C 10-10:10 a.m. Welcome and Opening Comments Mike Jarosz, Weld County Livestock Agent, CSU Extension Feed Efficiency: 10:15-11 a.m. The Big Picture of Feed Efficiency (Importance, Trends, and Future Direction). Dr. Denny Crews, Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences Dr. Crews will discuss how the beef industry, in the past, has focused on selecting for output traits such as growth ” but little attention has been placed on inputs such as intake and efficiency. Now with high feed costs the industry is driven to improve efficiency and is measuring feed intake the answer to improvement? Dr. Crews will define Residual Feed Intake (RFI) as a selection trait for efficiency describing the methods to measure and any implications of selecting for RFI. He will point out how to accurately select for efficiency and make strides the industry needs to test numerous animals and implement other tools such as genetic markers. 11:05-11:50 a.m. Fitting Feed Efficiency into the Beef Profit Equation. Dr. Gordon Carstens, Associate Professor, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M University Dr. Carstens will characterize the use of Residual Feed Intake (RFI) in growing and finishing cattle and describe why RFI is a better efficiency trait than feed to gain ratio. He will comment on if RFI is a “real” efficiency measure that can be linked to biological processes in the animal. Dr. Carstens will discuss if RFI selection can improve profitability to the cow/calf producer and if selecting for RFI will negatively affect reproduction, growth, carcass performance, or meat quality. He will wrap-up with discussing if other traits such as eating behavior (meals/day, etc.) are predictive of RFI and ultimately efficiency. LUNCH BREAK 11:55 – 12:55 p.m. Marketing: 1-1:45 p.m. Receiving Rewards for Paperwork Kevin Miller, Herd Manager, Croissant Red Angus Kevin will address how beef producers can reap financial rewards from simple paperwork. He will give example of what they do on their operation following cattle from birth through harvest and every step along the way. Plus, Kevin will discuss how Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) is being implemented and ways producers can capitalize on this initiative 1:50-2:25 p.m. Starting a Producer Calf Marketing COOP Dean Oatman, Las Animas County Agriculture, Livestock, & 4-H Agent, CSU Extension In his area, Dean is organizing a group of cow/calf producers bringing their calves together to market in larger groups of like calves to improve marketability and potential profitability. Dean will discuss their approach and the ideas that they are using for the marketing group to be successful. 2:30-3 p.m. Producer experience of a Calf Marketing COOP Larry Hoozee, Cow/calf Operation Owner – Stoneham, Colo. Larry will discuss, from a producer perspective, his experience being involved with a calf marketing group. He will address why the group formed, what went well, what challenges the group faced, and if he believes he received a premium for his calves due to the group. 2009 EQUINE DAY Grasslands/Pawnee Buttes Room 8:30-10 a.m. Preparing for the Use of Frozen Stallion Semen Trace Linnebur, Owner, Genetic Innovations, LLC – Deer Trail, CO Trace will conduct a discussion/laboratory session in which several topics will be addressed including an overview of the semen freezing process, normal and abnormal sperm cell motility and morphology, and the importance of good semen quality. The proper way to receive a frozen semen shipment will be presented, as well as techniques for thawing and preparing semen for AI use. 10 a.m.-Noon Angular Limb Deformities and Developmental Tendon Disorders Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO It is not unusual for a foal to be born with an angular limb deformity (crooked legs) or a developmental tendon disorder (knuckling forward or contracted tendons). Some of these deformities will self correct, while some will not. Dr. Jergens will discuss all of these conditions. She will explain which conditions correct, the conditions that won’t correct, and when to take action! She will discuss conservative and surgical treatments of these problems. 12-1 p.m. LUNCH BREAK 1-4 p.m. Tendon Injuries and Their Management Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO Tendon and ligament injuries are a significant cause of lameness in the equine athlete. Racing, jumping, endurance, or barrel racing predispose horses to these types of injuries. Horses of all breeds and uses, including the backyard or light use horse, can also injure these structures. Dr. Jergens will discuss tendon and ligament injuries, their diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. She will demonstrate effective rehabilitation techniques in a hands-on lab following the lecture. Thursday January 29 PARTNERS IN AG Event Center Room A 9 -10a.m. Using Soil Testing to Evaluate Soil Quality Jim Self, Director, CSU Soil, Water, and Plant Testing Laboratory – Ft. Collins, CO The use of soil testing is an effective way to determine the productivity and quality of the soil. Although a soil’s appearance can give an idea of its structure or texture, it cannot give a true indication of the nutrient content, salt level, or metal concentrations in the soil. A soil test provides the information to make informed decisions on how to manage the soil for enhanced productivity, make better use of resources, and obtain greater financial returns. 10:30-11:30a.m. Grass, Water, and Energy – How Do They Fit? Don Hijar, Owner/Manager, Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc.-Greeley, CO Everyone knows there’s a lot of work to be done when you start to grow any crop; plowing, disc work, and adding chemicals are a few of the expenses a farmer experiences. It also takes a large amount of energy and time to get a good crop established from year to year. But, if you plant grass rather than a conventional crop, your energy expenditure establishing a pasture will be cut down tremendously. As costs continue to rise and access to water gets tighter, planting the correct kind of grass can reduce your materials, energy, and irrigation expenses overall. Don will discuss the benefits of growing native grasses in a different manner than most conventional methods. 11:30-1:00 LUNCH BREAK 1-2p.m. Organic Fertilizers and Soil Amendments Jim Holland, Owner, Unlimited Expectations-Denver, CO Organic fertilizers and soil amendments to be used are usually dependent on the information determined by the area soil test. The soil should always be tested prior to using any materials to prevent worsening the soil. After the determination has been made, it will be necessary to decide what the purpose of the area will be used for because any growing material is considered to be a crop. http://www.unlimited_expectations.com HAY AND FORAGE Exhibition Room 10-11a.m. National Alfalfa and Forage Alliance Update Rod Christensen, Executive Secretary, National Alfalfa & Forage Alliance – Kennewick, WA Rod will be giving an update on NAFA activities and will explain how the organization operates and what the organization’s goals are. He will also be reporting on the current status of the re-deregulation efforts in the biotechnology industry. In addition, Rod will also share some of NAFA’s efforts in trying to bring various parties together to develop co-existence strategies. 11a.m. to Noon Carbon Credits: A New Source for Farming Revenue Lowell Messman, Aggregation Specialist, AgraGate Climate Credits Corporation – West Des Moines, IA Farm and ranch operators interested in learning more about opportunities in the market for carbon credits from their hay and forage crops and other land should plan to attend this one hour presentation. Lowell will discuss how the emerging carbon credits market is a new revenue opportunity for farm and ranch operators. He will give participants an understanding of the sign-up process so they can enroll their credits and begin to generate an additional return from their investment in conservation practices. Eligible practices include no-till and strip-till cropping, new forage plantings, sustainably managed rangeland, and methane destruction from livestock manure lagoons. 12-1p.m. LUNCH BREAK 1-2p.m. Strip-Tillage is Beyond a Tool-A Systems Approach to Better Soil Management Michael Petersen, Precision Tillage Agronomist, Orthman Manufacturing Inc. – Lexington, NE David Zimmerer, Sales Manager, Schlagel Manufacturing – Torrington, WY Tillage work has been wrongly presented as a beginning to a destructive end. With soils that have undergone intense tillage for the past 90-100 years for row crop production, the advocates of the quality conservation tillage approach have given a one bullet approach to recovery – Direct Seeding only. Utilizing a residue management program, vertical tillage in a specific zone, calculated and targeted fertilization program within the same zone as the tillage, we are able to improve soil quality within 3 years that benefits a farmer’s management system to improve yields, better control of inputs, wiser use of the grower’s time, and resources. In this presentation we will cover the systems approach to strip-tillage, benefits to soil characteristics that have been measured, and discuss fertilization management techniques that are cutting edge for growers to consider. SPANISH EDUCATION Grassland/Pawnee Butte Room 10a.m.-12p.m. Dairy Cow Well-Being: Identifying and Managing Cows at Risk of Becoming Downers Dr. Noa Roman-Muniz, Extension Dairy Specialist/Assistant Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences-Ft. Collins, CO In order to achieve our goal of assuring animal well-being and preventing cattle from becoming downers on the dairy farm, trailer or sale barn, we must become better observers and understand what animals are at risk of becoming non-ambulatory. The key is to identify animals at risk earlier on and deciding in a timely manner how to manage that animal. Should we treat the disease, cull, or euthanize on the farm? We will discuss the impact that management decisions could have on animal well-being, public safety, and public perception. Bienestar de vacas lecheras: identificando y manejando vacas a riesgo de caerse Para alcanzar la meta de asegurar el bienestar animal y prevenir que las vacas se caigan en la lecheria, durante el transporte o en la venta, necesitamos convertirnos en mejores observadores y entender que animales estan en riesgo de caerse y permanecer postrados. La clave es identificar a los animales en riesgo pronto y tomar una decision respecto a como manejarlos. ¿Debemos tratar la enfermedad, venderlos o administrar eutanasia en la lecheria? Discutiremos el impacto que las decisiones de manejo pueden tener en el bienestar animal, la salud publica y la percepcion del publico. v

2008 Colorado Farm Show Exhibitors and Booth Numbers

Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 163 1031 Exchange Specialists E 65 A Dbl R Well Services E 115 A-M Valve Co, LLC. E 123-124 ABC Seamless E 55-56 ABI Irrigation E 25-29 Abilene Machine Inc. FEA E Ackerman Distributing 4-H 230 Ag Journal EC 580-582 Agland, Incorporated FEA 344-345 Agri King E 144 Agri-Enterprises E 121-122 Agri-Inject EC 613-614 AgSolutions, LLC FEA 366 AgXplore International EC 587 All Truck Sales EC 571 Allison Transmissions E 9 American Nat’l Insurance Co. EC 530 American Pride Co-op EC 594 Anderson Alfalfa Co E 138 Archer Petroleum E 70 Area Diesel Service, Inc. E 37-38 Arkansas Valley Seed 4-H B A Terrific Mechanic, Inc. FEA A & C B & G Equipment, Inc. EC 513 Bank of Colorado 4-H 216 Banner Health-North Colorado Medical Center 4-H 214-215 B-A-R Distribution Co. Inc. FEA G2 Beaver Valley Supply FEA 319-320 Bekaert Corporation E 109 Betaseed, Inc. E 77-79 Big R of Greeley EC 467-468 Bill’s Volume Sales West FEA 367-368 Blu-Jet by Thurston Mfg. Co. FEA 331-333 Bobcat of the Rockies 354-356 Bobcat of the Rockies EC 547-549, Brothers Equipment, Inc. 573-575 Brothers Equipment, Inc. 4-H 206 Buckboard Bean, Inc. E 105-107 Buckeye Welding Supply FEA G 1 Burrows Enterprises & Fisher Pumps, Inc FEA 337-339 Bush Hog FEA 322 Bushel 300, Inc. E 97 Cache Valley Select Sires FEA 327-330 Carson Trailer 357-360 Carson Trailer EC 568-569 Centennial Ag Supply FEA 376-377 Central City Scale, Inc. EC 596 Central Colo. Water Conservancy EC 566-567 Central, Inc. Booth No. Exhibitor Name EC 495-497, 521-523 Champion Dodge FEA 371-372 Clarks Ag Supply E 76 Cleanfix Reversible Fans OS Cochran Farm Supply 4-H 221 Collins Communications 4-H 232 Colorado 4-H Foundation E 42 Colorado Bean Company EC 532 Colorado Beef Council E 5 Colo. Conservation Tillage Assoc. EC 620 Colorado Corn E 66-67 Colorado Dairy Service, LLC 4-H 208 Colorado Department of Ag E 101 Colo. Division of Water Resources 4-H 218-220, 225-227 Colorado Division of Wildlife EC 562-563 Colorado East Bank & Trust EC 589-591 Colorado Equipment E 14-16 Colorado Equipment E 88-89 Colorado Farm Bureau E 1 Colorado FFA Foundation E 2 Colorado Foundation For Ag E 64 Colorado Hay & Forage Assoc. FEA 303 CHFA E 127 Colorado Land Investments E 90 Colorado Seed Growers Assoc. E 94 Colorado Soy, LLC E 8 Colo. Wheat Admin Committee E 133 Colorado Young Farmers EC 621 Cox Oil Co. 4H 222 Crop Quest, Inc. EC 583 Crossroads Insurance Agency E 135-136 Crow Valley Panels E 33 Crows Hybrid Corn Co. E 71 Custom Marketing Co., Inc. E 142 D & D Commodities Ltd E 10-12 Dairy Specialists E 63 Dairyland Laboratories E 72-74 Dixon ZTR Mowers E 128 Diversity D, Inc. 4-H C-D Double “O” Farms E 22 DTN E 160-162 Eastern Colo. Seeds/BarenbrugUSA 4-H 224 Ecoquest Independent Dlr. EC 593 Edward Jones Investments EC 2 Ehrlich Toyota E 57 Empire Irrigation, Inc. E 154 Energy Panel Structures EC 510 Evans Excavating 4-H 231 Fairbanks Equipment FEA 343 Farm Credit Leasing FEA 323 Farm Plus Financial EC 592 Farm Works Software Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 13 Farmco/High Plains Livestock EC 553 Fastline Publications E 137 Feldt Sales EC 616 Fence Post E 6 First FarmBank FEA 340 Flat Iron Steel EC 550-551,576-577 Flat River Agri, Inc EC 615 Flood & Peterson Insurance EC 558-559 Fontanelle Hybrids E 103-104 Frontier Glove Co. EC E G&M Implement, Inc. EC 607 Garnsey & Wheeler Ford E 145-150 Garnsey & Wheeler Ford EC 557 Garst Seed Co. E 155-158 General Air FEA 334 Genesis Soil Rite Calcium/ Midstates Consulting E 68 Genex Cooperative FEA 361-363 GFC EC 552 Giant Rubber Water Tanks FEA 301-302 Golden Harvest/JC Robinson Seed Company 4-H 210-211 Grand Valley Hybrids E 115 Great Plains Meters FEA B1 Great Plains Mfg., Inc. OS Great West Trailer & Truck Sales E 111 Greeley Independence Stampede EC 608 Guaranty Bank and Trust FEA 309-310 H2O Power Equipment Inc E 53 Hagie Mfg. Company FEA L 1 Harsh International, Inc. EC 595, E 17 High Plains Journal E 143 Hill Petroleum EC 512 Hilleshog/Syngenta Seed EC 556 Hitchcock, Inc. E 117 Hotsy Equip of No. Colo. 4-H 234 Hydropedes E 151-153 Hydroscreen EC 579 Interstate Energy Inc. 4-H 223 J&T Country Feeds FEA B2 JJ Equipment/Brillion/Rhino EC D John Deere E 130 Johnstown Clothing& Embroidery 4-H A Kaput Products-Ridarodent FEA 335-336, 351-352 KD Loaders FEA B1 KP Sales and Marketing Inc EC 619 Kreps Wiedeman E 164 KSIR Radio EC 555 Kugler Company EC 3 Kuhn-Knight Mfg. EC 525-526 Larson Metal Inc. EC 528-529 Lawson Products Inc EC 586 Lefever Building Systems 4-H 203 Legacy Land Trust E 125-126 Lewton Ag Services/Nitro Sprayers E 93 LG Seeds Booth No. Exhibitor Name FEA 311 Loveland Distribution FEA L2 Luther Equipment FEA D MacDon, Inc. E 86-87 Magnum Manufacturing/ Woodys Pivot Service FEA 369-370 Maize Corp/Kearney Equip EC 508 Maxey Companies, Inc. EC 564 Mel Brown Farm Supply EC 578 Metrogro EC 599-602 MHC Kenworth E 32 Mid West Truck Parts EC 537 Midwest Seed Genetics 4-H 233 Miracle Ear FEA 373 Moly Mfg, Inc./Silencer EC 534-536 Monosem E 112-113 Monsanto FEA 315-316 Moreta Company, Inc. E 84 Morgan CC-Agri & Bus Mgmt. FEA 307-308 Mortec Industries, Inc. EC 527 Morton Buildings, Inc. EC 539 Mountain Plains Farm Credit EC 531 NAPA Parts E 95 Nat’l. Farmers Union Insurance E 75 Nations Pipe & Steel E 54 Navigator E 59 NC+ Hybrids E 92 Neb. College of Technical Ag E 129 Netafim USA EC 617-618 New Frontier Bank EC 511 NK Brand Seed of Syngenta E 102 No-Bull Enterprises E 7 Northeastern Jr. College FEA 317 Northern Colo. Driveline Service EC 506-507 No. Colo. Water Conservancy EC 478-480, 492-494 Orthman Mfg. EC 517-518, 543-544 Outback Guidance 4-H 201 Paradise Landscaping FEA 326 Paul’s Custom Grinding Svc. E 30-31 Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc. 4-H 205 P-Diamond Irrigation Sales, Svc. E 91 Petersen Mfg Co. Inc EC 498 PGS Hybrids, Inc. FEA 306 Pickett Equipment E 118-120 Pioneer, A Dupont Co. E 21 Pivots Plus 4-H 223 Pletcher Enterprises E 99-100 Poudre Valley Co-Op Seed Div. FEA 324-225 Poudre Valley Co-Op/ Hutchison Western FEA 336 Poudre Valley REA EC 561 Poulsen Ace Hardware FEA G3 Power Equipment Co. 4-H Prairie Dog Man E 52 Producer’s Choice Seed/PGI FEA 318 Pure Ag Products Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 43-45 Quality Well & Pump EC 588 Rabo AgriFinance EC 502-503 Ranch-Way Feeds 4-H 207 Red Wing Shoes E 39 Regent Broadcasting K99 (KUAD-FM) E 18-19 Reinke Manufacturing EC 524 Reliance Industrial Products E 49 Reliv, International EC 603-605 Renewable Fiber FEA B2 Rhino-Brillion EC 471-473, 485-487 RHS/Bestway E 98 Ritchey Mfg E 41 Robinson Hay Company EC 584-585 Rky. Mtn. Cleaning Systems EC 538 Rky. Mtn. Water Environ Assoc. FEA 313 Rodenator EC 572 Rodman & Company, Inc. EC 554 Roggen Farmers Elevator Assn. EC C Ron’s Equipment Co. Inc. 4-H 212 Rural Community Ins. Svcs. EC 514-516, 540-542 Schaben Industries 4-H 209 Schaeffer Oil & Grease Co. EC 469-471, 483-484 Schlagel Mfg. E 96 Schmidt’s Bakery & Deli E 46 Schroeder’s Tire E 159 SFR HiTech Lubricants E 80-81 Sharp Bros. Seed EC 499-501 Shield Ag Equipment FEA 312 Shur-Co E 47 Silveus Insurance Group E 34-36 Simplot Soilbuilders 4-H 204 Soil Savers E 62 Soybest EC 607, E 145-150 Spradley-Barr OS Stampede Steel FEA 314 Starco Mfg EC 570 Stewart & Stevenson FEA 375 Stinger Ltd. EC 509 Stockton Roofing E 131 Strategic Financial Mgmt. EC 519-520, 545-546 Sutherland Lumber Co. EC 505 Synthetic Resources, Inc. FEA 346-350 T&B Welding & Trailers, LLC EC 597 Tarps Unlimited EC 481-482 Tidenberg Welding & Repair EC 565 Tire Pro FEA 304-305 Tool & Anchor Supply E 134 Toro Micro-Irrigation EC 504 TractorHouse EC 1 Transwest Trailers Booth No. Exhibitor Name FEA 378-380 Triple C, Inc. Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 69 Triumph Seed FEA 364-365 Tru Blu, LLC E 82-83 Twin Peaks Powersports EC 598 U.S.D.A. Colo. Ag Statistics E 85 USDA Farm Service Agency E 50-51 USDA National Appeals Div. E 114 UNI Design E 139-141 Valley Irrigation of Greeley EC 560 Vander Wal Dairy S & S E 3-4 Viaero Wireless EC B Wagner Ag/Wagner Rents E 23-24 Walco Animal Health E 110 Warren Analytical Laboratory FEA 342 Water Colorado, LLC E 60-61 WDPA/ Northern Colo. Dairyettes FEA G4 & G5 Weiss Master Mfg. 4-H 217 Weld County Drug Task Force E 48 Weld County Fair EC 606 Weld County Garage 4-H 202 Weld County Public Works Dept/Weed & Pest 4-H 228 Weld County Sheriff’s Office E 108 West Greeley Conservation District E 132 West Plains Grain EC 609-610 Western Irrigation EC 611-612 Western Material Handling E 20 Whatwire Broadband EC A Wickham Tractor Co./Krone E 40 Wild West Motorsport E 58 Wilson Trailer Sales 4-H 229 Wingfoot Commercial Tire systems EC 533 WW Auctions & Real Estate EC 474-477, 488-491 Wylie Sprayers FEA 374 Xpect Solutions, Inc. Legend e exhibition building fea farm equipment area 4-H 4-h building ec event center os outside

Rocky Mountain Edition Obituaries

Ray Schneider, age 83, of Lamar, Colo., died Nov. 10, 2007, at his home, surrounded by his family. He was born on Nov. 18, 1923, in Montgomery City, Mo. Ray married Lily Mae Pitts on May 8, 1943, in Colorado Springs, Colo., where he was stationed at Camp Carson. He served during World War II with the 71st Infantry Division of Patton’s Third Army. He was awarded the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. Following his discharge, he moved to Las Animas, Colo., where he and his wife farmed for many years. He was involved in many activities in Bent County, including announcing for local rodeos, square dance caller for 4-H clubs, and assisting high school classes on Santa Fe Trail Day. He was a member of Young Farmers of America, the Bent County Roping Club, and won various awards for his service as a 4-H leader. He was also an FFA Chapter Farmer. In 1960, Ray became a Colorado Brand Inspector, working out of the LaJunta area. He moved to Lamar in 1969 as Brand Inspector Foreman, retiring in 1980. Following retirement, he and Lil spent their summers fishing and camping in the mountains near Creede, and their winters near Bullhead City, Ariz., Laughlin and Searchlight, Nev., with their many RV friends. Ray loved animals, his favorite being his horse Snip, and favorite dogs Buddy and Kizzie. He was a calf roper in his earlier days, switching to team roping later on. He loved to fish. He was a woodworker and handyman. He made models of windmills and old wagons, which he shared with others.He loved hunting, shooting and playing cards with friends. Ray is survived by his wife of 64 years, Lily Mae, whom he affectionately called “Butch;” three children: daughter Barbara “Bobbie” Rains and Galen Sears of LaJunta, Colo., and sons Jim Schneider of Conifer, Colo., and Rick Schneider and wife Sue of Grand Junction, Colo.; grandchildren Bill Rains and wife Kathy of Gill, Colo., Tessa Rains and Kyle Yaste of Evans, Colo., Abby Schneider of Durango, Colo., and Cara Schneider and Ed Dean of Everett, Washington; five great-grandchildren: Sid Jackson, R.C. Jackson, Dalton Yaste, Madeline Mae Dean, and a step-great-granddaughter, Kialie Yaste. He is also survived by a sister-in-law, Vivian Pitts of Las Animas and family; brothers Richard Schneider and Russell Schneider of Jonesboro, Ark., and extended family. Services were held on Nov. 14 in Las Animas, with interment at Fort Lyon National Cemetery with military honors by VFW Post #2411. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Lamar Area Hospice Association, Lamar, Colo. Ray Schneider, age 83, of Lamar, Colo., died Nov. 10, 2007, at his home, surrounded by his family. He was born on Nov. 18, 1923, in Montgomery City, Mo. Ray married Lily Mae Pitts on May 8, 1943, in Colorado Springs, Colo., where he was stationed at Camp Carson. He served during World War II with the 71st Infantry Division of Patton’s Third Army. He was awarded the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. Following his discharge, he moved to Las Animas, Colo., where he and his wife farmed for many years. He was involved in many activities in Bent County, including announcing for local rodeos, square dance caller for 4-H clubs, and assisting high school classes on Santa Fe Trail Day. He was a member of Young Farmers of America, the Bent County Roping Club, and won various awards for his service as a 4-H leader. He was also an FFA Chapter Farmer. In 1960, Ray became a Colorado Brand Inspector, working out of the LaJunta area. He moved to Lamar in 1969 as Brand Inspector Foreman, retiring in 1980. Following retirement, he and Lil spent their summers fishing and camping in the mountains near Creede, and their winters near Bullhead City, Ariz., Laughlin and Searchlight, Nev., with their many RV friends. Ray loved animals, his favorite being his horse Snip, and favorite dogs Buddy and Kizzie. He was a calf roper in his earlier days, switching to team roping later on. He loved to fish. He was a woodworker and handyman. He made models of windmills and old wagons, which he shared with others.He loved hunting, shooting and playing cards with friends. Ray is survived by his wife of 64 years, Lily Mae, whom he affectionately called “Butch;” three children: daughter Barbara “Bobbie” Rains and Galen Sears of LaJunta, Colo., and sons Jim Schneider of Conifer, Colo., and Rick Schneider and wife Sue of Grand Junction, Colo.; grandchildren Bill Rains and wife Kathy of Gill, Colo., Tessa Rains and Kyle Yaste of Evans, Colo., Abby Schneider of Durango, Colo., and Cara Schneider and Ed Dean of Everett, Washington; five great-grandchildren: Sid Jackson, R.C. Jackson, Dalton Yaste, Madeline Mae Dean, and a step-great-granddaughter, Kialie Yaste. He is also survived by a sister-in-law, Vivian Pitts of Las Animas and family; brothers Richard Schneider and Russell Schneider of Jonesboro, Ark., and extended family. Services were held on Nov. 14 in Las Animas, with interment at Fort Lyon National Cemetery with military honors by VFW Post #2411. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Lamar Area Hospice Association, Lamar, Colo. Ray Schneider, age 83, of Lamar, Colo., died Nov. 10, 2007, at his home, surrounded by his family. He was born on Nov. 18, 1923, in Montgomery City, Mo. Ray married Lily Mae Pitts on May 8, 1943, in Colorado Springs, Colo., where he was stationed at Camp Carson. He served during World War II with the 71st Infantry Division of Patton’s Third Army. He was awarded the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. Following his discharge, he moved to Las Animas, Colo., where he and his wife farmed for many years. He was involved in many activities in Bent County, including announcing for local rodeos, square dance caller for 4-H clubs, and assisting high school classes on Santa Fe Trail Day. He was a member of Young Farmers of America, the Bent County Roping Club, and won various awards for his service as a 4-H leader. He was also an FFA Chapter Farmer. In 1960, Ray became a Colorado Brand Inspector, working out of the LaJunta area. He moved to Lamar in 1969 as Brand Inspector Foreman, retiring in 1980. Following retirement, he and Lil spent their summers fishing and camping in the mountains near Creede, and their winters near Bullhead City, Ariz., Laughlin and Searchlight, Nev., with their many RV friends. Ray loved animals, his favorite being his horse Snip, and favorite dogs Buddy and Kizzie. He was a calf roper in his earlier days, switching to team roping later on. He loved to fish. He was a woodworker and handyman. He made models of windmills and old wagons, which he shared with others.He loved hunting, shooting and playing cards with friends. Ray is survived by his wife of 64 years, Lily Mae, whom he affectionately called “Butch;” three children: daughter Barbara “Bobbie” Rains and Galen Sears of LaJunta, Colo., and sons Jim Schneider of Conifer, Colo., and Rick Schneider and wife Sue of Grand Junction, Colo.; grandchildren Bill Rains and wife Kathy of Gill, Colo., Tessa Rains and Kyle Yaste of Evans, Colo., Abby Schneider of Durango, Colo., and Cara Schneider and Ed Dean of Everett, Washington; five great-grandchildren: Sid Jackson, R.C. Jackson, Dalton Yaste, Madeline Mae Dean, and a step-great-granddaughter, Kialie Yaste. He is also survived by a sister-in-law, Vivian Pitts of Las Animas and family; brothers Richard Schneider and Russell Schneider of Jonesboro, Ark., and extended family. Services were held on Nov. 14 in Las Animas, with interment at Fort Lyon National Cemetery with military honors by VFW Post #2411. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Lamar Area Hospice Association, Lamar, Colo. Ray Schneider, age 83, of Lamar, Colo., died Nov. 10, 2007, at his home, surrounded by his family. He was born on Nov. 18, 1923, in Montgomery City, Mo. Ray married Lily Mae Pitts on May 8, 1943, in Colorado Springs, Colo., where he was stationed at Camp Carson. He served during World War II with the 71st Infantry Division of Patton’s Third Army. He was awarded the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. Following his discharge, he moved to Las Animas, Colo., where he and his wife farmed for many years. He was involved in many activities in Bent County, including announcing for local rodeos, square dance caller for 4-H clubs, and assisting high school classes on Santa Fe Trail Day. He was a member of Young Farmers of America, the Bent County Roping Club, and won various awards for his service as a 4-H leader. He was also an FFA Chapter Farmer. In 1960, Ray became a Colorado Brand Inspector, working out of the LaJunta area. He moved to Lamar in 1969 as Brand Inspector Foreman, retiring in 1980. Following retirement, he and Lil spent their summers fishing and camping in the mountains near Creede, and their winters near Bullhead City, Ariz., Laughlin and Searchlight, Nev., with their many RV friends. Ray loved animals, his favorite being his horse Snip, and favorite dogs Buddy and Kizzie. He was a calf roper in his earlier days, switching to team roping later on. He loved to fish. He was a woodworker and handyman. He made models of windmills and old wagons, which he shared with others.He loved hunting, shooting and playing cards with friends. Ray is survived by his wife of 64 years, Lily Mae, whom he affectionately called “Butch;” three children: daughter Barbara “Bobbie” Rains and Galen Sears of LaJunta, Colo., and sons Jim Schneider of Conifer, Colo., and Rick Schneider and wife Sue of Grand Junction, Colo.; grandchildren Bill Rains and wife Kathy of Gill, Colo., Tessa Rains and Kyle Yaste of Evans, Colo., Abby Schneider of Durango, Colo., and Cara Schneider and Ed Dean of Everett, Washington; five great-grandchildren: Sid Jackson, R.C. Jackson, Dalton Yaste, Madeline Mae Dean, and a step-great-granddaughter, Kialie Yaste. He is also survived by a sister-in-law, Vivian Pitts of Las Animas and family; brothers Richard Schneider and Russell Schneider of Jonesboro, Ark., and extended family. Services were held on Nov. 14 in Las Animas, with interment at Fort Lyon National Cemetery with military honors by VFW Post #2411. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Lamar Area Hospice Association, Lamar, Colo. Ray Schneider, age 83, of Lamar, Colo., died Nov. 10, 2007, at his home, surrounded by his family. He was born on Nov. 18, 1923, in Montgomery City, Mo. Ray married Lily Mae Pitts on May 8, 1943, in Colorado Springs, Colo., where he was stationed at Camp Carson. He served during World War II with the 71st Infantry Division of Patton’s Third Army. He was awarded the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. Following his discharge, he moved to Las Animas, Colo., where he and his wife farmed for many years. He was involved in many activities in Bent County, including announcing for local rodeos, square dance caller for 4-H clubs, and assisting high school classes on Santa Fe Trail Day. He was a member of Young Farmers of America, the Bent County Roping Club, and won various awards for his service as a 4-H leader. He was also an FFA Chapter Farmer. In 1960, Ray became a Colorado Brand Inspector, working out of the LaJunta area. He moved to Lamar in 1969 as Brand Inspector Foreman, retiring in 1980. Following retirement, he and Lil spent their summers fishing and camping in the mountains near Creede, and their winters near Bullhead City, Ariz., Laughlin and Searchlight, Nev., with their many RV friends. Ray loved animals, his favorite being his horse Snip, and favorite dogs Buddy and Kizzie. He was a calf roper in his earlier days, switching to team roping later on. He loved to fish. He was a woodworker and handyman. He made models of windmills and old wagons, which he shared with others.He loved hunting, shooting and playing cards with friends. Ray is survived by his wife of 64 years, Lily Mae, whom he affectionately called “Butch;” three children: daughter Barbara “Bobbie” Rains and Galen Sears of LaJunta, Colo., and sons Jim Schneider of Conifer, Colo., and Rick Schneider and wife Sue of Grand Junction, Colo.; grandchildren Bill Rains and wife Kathy of Gill, Colo., Tessa Rains and Kyle Yaste of Evans, Colo., Abby Schneider of Durango, Colo., and Cara Schneider and Ed Dean of Everett, Washington; five great-grandchildren: Sid Jackson, R.C. Jackson, Dalton Yaste, Madeline Mae Dean, and a step-great-granddaughter, Kialie Yaste. He is also survived by a sister-in-law, Vivian Pitts of Las Animas and family; brothers Richard Schneider and Russell Schneider of Jonesboro, Ark., and extended family. Services were held on Nov. 14 in Las Animas, with interment at Fort Lyon National Cemetery with military honors by VFW Post #2411. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Lamar Area Hospice Association, Lamar, Colo.

2008 Colorado Farm Show Exhibitors and Booth Numbers

Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 163 1031 Exchange Specialists E 65 A Dbl R Well Services E 115 A-M Valve Co, LLC. E 123-124 ABC Seamless E 55-56 ABI Irrigation E 25-29 Abilene Machine Inc. FEA E Ackerman Distributing 4-H 230 Ag Journal EC 580-582 Agland, Incorporated FEA 344-345 Agri King E 144 Agri-Enterprises E 121-122 Agri-Inject EC 613-614 AgSolutions, LLC FEA 366 AgXplore International EC 587 All Truck Sales EC 571 Allison Transmissions E 9 American Nat’l Insurance Co. EC 530 American Pride Co-op EC 594 Anderson Alfalfa Co E 138 Archer Petroleum E 70 Area Diesel Service, Inc. E 37-38 Arkansas Valley Seed 4-H B A Terrific Mechanic, Inc. FEA A & C B & G Equipment, Inc. EC 513 Bank of Colorado 4-H 216 Banner Health-North Colorado Medical Center 4-H 214-215 B-A-R Distribution Co. Inc. FEA G2 Beaver Valley Supply FEA 319-320 Bekaert Corporation E 109 Betaseed, Inc. E 77-79 Big R of Greeley EC 467-468 Bill’s Volume Sales West FEA 367-368 Blu-Jet by Thurston Mfg. Co. FEA 331-333 Bobcat of the Rockies 354-356 Bobcat of the Rockies EC 547-549, Brothers Equipment, Inc. 573-575 Brothers Equipment, Inc. 4-H 206 Buckboard Bean, Inc. E 105-107 Buckeye Welding Supply FEA G 1 Burrows Enterprises & Fisher Pumps, Inc FEA 337-339 Bush Hog FEA 322 Bushel 300, Inc. E 97 Cache Valley Select Sires FEA 327-330 Carson Trailer 357-360 Carson Trailer EC 568-569 Centennial Ag Supply FEA 376-377 Central City Scale, Inc. EC 596 Central Colo. Water Conservancy EC 566-567 Central, Inc. Booth No. Exhibitor Name EC 495-497, 521-523 Champion Dodge FEA 371-372 Clarks Ag Supply E 76 Cleanfix Reversible Fans OS Cochran Farm Supply 4-H 221 Collins Communications 4-H 232 Colorado 4-H Foundation E 42 Colorado Bean Company EC 532 Colorado Beef Council E 5 Colo. Conservation Tillage Assoc. EC 620 Colorado Corn E 66-67 Colorado Dairy Service, LLC 4-H 208 Colorado Department of Ag E 101 Colo. Division of Water Resources 4-H 218-220, 225-227 Colorado Division of Wildlife EC 562-563 Colorado East Bank & Trust EC 589-591 Colorado Equipment E 14-16 Colorado Equipment E 88-89 Colorado Farm Bureau E 1 Colorado FFA Foundation E 2 Colorado Foundation For Ag E 64 Colorado Hay & Forage Assoc. FEA 303 CHFA E 127 Colorado Land Investments E 90 Colorado Seed Growers Assoc. E 94 Colorado Soy, LLC E 8 Colo. Wheat Admin Committee E 133 Colorado Young Farmers EC 621 Cox Oil Co. 4H 222 Crop Quest, Inc. EC 583 Crossroads Insurance Agency E 135-136 Crow Valley Panels E 33 Crows Hybrid Corn Co. E 71 Custom Marketing Co., Inc. E 142 D & D Commodities Ltd E 10-12 Dairy Specialists E 63 Dairyland Laboratories E 72-74 Dixon ZTR Mowers E 128 Diversity D, Inc. 4-H C-D Double “O” Farms E 22 DTN E 160-162 Eastern Colo. Seeds/BarenbrugUSA 4-H 224 Ecoquest Independent Dlr. EC 593 Edward Jones Investments EC 2 Ehrlich Toyota E 57 Empire Irrigation, Inc. E 154 Energy Panel Structures EC 510 Evans Excavating 4-H 231 Fairbanks Equipment FEA 343 Farm Credit Leasing FEA 323 Farm Plus Financial EC 592 Farm Works Software Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 13 Farmco/High Plains Livestock EC 553 Fastline Publications E 137 Feldt Sales EC 616 Fence Post E 6 First FarmBank FEA 340 Flat Iron Steel EC 550-551,576-577 Flat River Agri, Inc EC 615 Flood & Peterson Insurance EC 558-559 Fontanelle Hybrids E 103-104 Frontier Glove Co. EC E G&M Implement, Inc. EC 607 Garnsey & Wheeler Ford E 145-150 Garnsey & Wheeler Ford EC 557 Garst Seed Co. E 155-158 General Air FEA 334 Genesis Soil Rite Calcium/ Midstates Consulting E 68 Genex Cooperative FEA 361-363 GFC EC 552 Giant Rubber Water Tanks FEA 301-302 Golden Harvest/JC Robinson Seed Company 4-H 210-211 Grand Valley Hybrids E 115 Great Plains Meters FEA B1 Great Plains Mfg., Inc. OS Great West Trailer & Truck Sales E 111 Greeley Independence Stampede EC 608 Guaranty Bank and Trust FEA 309-310 H2O Power Equipment Inc E 53 Hagie Mfg. Company FEA L 1 Harsh International, Inc. EC 595, E 17 High Plains Journal E 143 Hill Petroleum EC 512 Hilleshog/Syngenta Seed EC 556 Hitchcock, Inc. E 117 Hotsy Equip of No. Colo. 4-H 234 Hydropedes E 151-153 Hydroscreen EC 579 Interstate Energy Inc. 4-H 223 J&T Country Feeds FEA B2 JJ Equipment/Brillion/Rhino EC D John Deere E 130 Johnstown Clothing& Embroidery 4-H A Kaput Products-Ridarodent FEA 335-336, 351-352 KD Loaders FEA B1 KP Sales and Marketing Inc EC 619 Kreps Wiedeman E 164 KSIR Radio EC 555 Kugler Company EC 3 Kuhn-Knight Mfg. EC 525-526 Larson Metal Inc. EC 528-529 Lawson Products Inc EC 586 Lefever Building Systems 4-H 203 Legacy Land Trust E 125-126 Lewton Ag Services/Nitro Sprayers E 93 LG Seeds Booth No. Exhibitor Name FEA 311 Loveland Distribution FEA L2 Luther Equipment FEA D MacDon, Inc. E 86-87 Magnum Manufacturing/ Woodys Pivot Service FEA 369-370 Maize Corp/Kearney Equip EC 508 Maxey Companies, Inc. EC 564 Mel Brown Farm Supply EC 578 Metrogro EC 599-602 MHC Kenworth E 32 Mid West Truck Parts EC 537 Midwest Seed Genetics 4-H 233 Miracle Ear FEA 373 Moly Mfg, Inc./Silencer EC 534-536 Monosem E 112-113 Monsanto FEA 315-316 Moreta Company, Inc. E 84 Morgan CC-Agri & Bus Mgmt. FEA 307-308 Mortec Industries, Inc. EC 527 Morton Buildings, Inc. EC 539 Mountain Plains Farm Credit EC 531 NAPA Parts E 95 Nat’l. Farmers Union Insurance E 75 Nations Pipe & Steel E 54 Navigator E 59 NC+ Hybrids E 92 Neb. College of Technical Ag E 129 Netafim USA EC 617-618 New Frontier Bank EC 511 NK Brand Seed of Syngenta E 102 No-Bull Enterprises E 7 Northeastern Jr. College FEA 317 Northern Colo. Driveline Service EC 506-507 No. Colo. Water Conservancy EC 478-480, 492-494 Orthman Mfg. EC 517-518, 543-544 Outback Guidance 4-H 201 Paradise Landscaping FEA 326 Paul’s Custom Grinding Svc. E 30-31 Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc. 4-H 205 P-Diamond Irrigation Sales, Svc. E 91 Petersen Mfg Co. Inc EC 498 PGS Hybrids, Inc. FEA 306 Pickett Equipment E 118-120 Pioneer, A Dupont Co. E 21 Pivots Plus 4-H 223 Pletcher Enterprises E 99-100 Poudre Valley Co-Op Seed Div. FEA 324-225 Poudre Valley Co-Op/ Hutchison Western FEA 336 Poudre Valley REA EC 561 Poulsen Ace Hardware FEA G3 Power Equipment Co. 4-H Prairie Dog Man E 52 Producer’s Choice Seed/PGI FEA 318 Pure Ag Products Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 43-45 Quality Well & Pump EC 588 Rabo AgriFinance EC 502-503 Ranch-Way Feeds 4-H 207 Red Wing Shoes E 39 Regent Broadcasting K99 (KUAD-FM) E 18-19 Reinke Manufacturing EC 524 Reliance Industrial Products E 49 Reliv, International EC 603-605 Renewable Fiber FEA B2 Rhino-Brillion EC 471-473, 485-487 RHS/Bestway E 98 Ritchey Mfg E 41 Robinson Hay Company EC 584-585 Rky. Mtn. Cleaning Systems EC 538 Rky. Mtn. Water Environ Assoc. FEA 313 Rodenator EC 572 Rodman & Company, Inc. EC 554 Roggen Farmers Elevator Assn. EC C Ron’s Equipment Co. Inc. 4-H 212 Rural Community Ins. Svcs. EC 514-516, 540-542 Schaben Industries 4-H 209 Schaeffer Oil & Grease Co. EC 469-471, 483-484 Schlagel Mfg. E 96 Schmidt’s Bakery & Deli E 46 Schroeder’s Tire E 159 SFR HiTech Lubricants E 80-81 Sharp Bros. Seed EC 499-501 Shield Ag Equipment FEA 312 Shur-Co E 47 Silveus Insurance Group E 34-36 Simplot Soilbuilders 4-H 204 Soil Savers E 62 Soybest EC 607, E 145-150 Spradley-Barr OS Stampede Steel FEA 314 Starco Mfg EC 570 Stewart & Stevenson FEA 375 Stinger Ltd. EC 509 Stockton Roofing E 131 Strategic Financial Mgmt. EC 519-520, 545-546 Sutherland Lumber Co. EC 505 Synthetic Resources, Inc. FEA 346-350 T&B Welding & Trailers, LLC EC 597 Tarps Unlimited EC 481-482 Tidenberg Welding & Repair EC 565 Tire Pro FEA 304-305 Tool & Anchor Supply E 134 Toro Micro-Irrigation EC 504 TractorHouse EC 1 Transwest Trailers Booth No. Exhibitor Name FEA 378-380 Triple C, Inc. Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 69 Triumph Seed FEA 364-365 Tru Blu, LLC E 82-83 Twin Peaks Powersports EC 598 U.S.D.A. Colo. Ag Statistics E 85 USDA Farm Service Agency E 50-51 USDA National Appeals Div. E 114 UNI Design E 139-141 Valley Irrigation of Greeley EC 560 Vander Wal Dairy S & S E 3-4 Viaero Wireless EC B Wagner Ag/Wagner Rents E 23-24 Walco Animal Health E 110 Warren Analytical Laboratory FEA 342 Water Colorado, LLC E 60-61 WDPA/ Northern Colo. Dairyettes FEA G4 & G5 Weiss Master Mfg. 4-H 217 Weld County Drug Task Force E 48 Weld County Fair EC 606 Weld County Garage 4-H 202 Weld County Public Works Dept/Weed & Pest 4-H 228 Weld County Sheriff’s Office E 108 West Greeley Conservation District E 132 West Plains Grain EC 609-610 Western Irrigation EC 611-612 Western Material Handling E 20 Whatwire Broadband EC A Wickham Tractor Co./Krone E 40 Wild West Motorsport E 58 Wilson Trailer Sales 4-H 229 Wingfoot Commercial Tire systems EC 533 WW Auctions & Real Estate EC 474-477, 488-491 Wylie Sprayers FEA 374 Xpect Solutions, Inc. Legend e exhibition building fea farm equipment area 4-H 4-h building ec event center os outside

Drones: Industry Risk Or Opportunity?

Drones — Industry Risk Or Opportunity? By Amanda Radke A National Geographic article published in July 2014 and written by Mary Beth Albright entitled, "How drones will change the way you eat," discussed the use of drones in a variety of situations. She addressed the concept of a photographer shooting photos without permission, attempting to portray agriculture producers as criminals. Albright wrote, "Drones will improve the welfare of animals we eat and use for food production. Investigative journalist Will Potter has been long frustrated by state 'ag gag' laws criminalizing the use of false pretenses to access a farm for purposes not authorized by the owner (such as photographing animal cruelty). In some cases, the photographer is subject to greater punishment than the perpetrator of animal cruelty. So Potter got creative with a Kickstarter campaign to buy drones and photography equipment to fly over and photograph factory farms and concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) … "Titled 'Drone on the farm,' the campaign to 'combine drone photography with investigative reporting' raised about $75,000–more than twice its original goal–for materials and legal counsel. The rules are still murky about the relatively new area of unmanned flight and photography, so legal challenges are practically inevitable. Whether one agrees with Potter's goal of exposing factory farms, the general privacy ramifications of allowing contested aerial photography, particularly when drones can cost as little as a few hundred dollars—are troubling." The idea of an investigative journalist capturing footage of a feedlot or cow-calf operation is worrisome to producers who fear how aerial shots of their operations might be interpreted and how they might be used to push forward extreme animal activist agendas. After the article published, drones were a hot topic, with mainstream media coverage discussing ways drones can be used – everything from shooting photos and videos of weddings to one day delivering pizzas directly to individual homes. Of course, when used correctly, drones can be a friend to agriculture, not a foe. At the 2014 DakotaFest held on Aug. 19-21 in Mitchell, S.D., drones were a big focus, with four presentations dedicated to discussing the unmanned aerial vehicles. Drones can be used to spot stressed corn or locate stray cattle using infrared cameras. They can also be used to identify insect problems and water issues, measure crop yields, track wildlife, reduce runoff, and rationalize fertilizer and pesticide use. Justin Oberman, president at Measure, a a civilian drone service company, spoke at one of the sessions on drones at DakotaFest. He said the benefits of using drones in an agricultural operation far outweigh the costs. "The use of drones has to demonstrate a positive return on investment," said Oberman. "South Dakota farmers and ranchers are great candidates for drone usage. Drones can be used by agriculturalists to tackle dull, dirty and dangerous jobs." Several drones were on display during DakotaFest for attendees to view. Priced between $2,000 and $15,000, these drones can travel at the speed of 35-40 mph and weigh under five pounds. A drone can be operated with a smartphone or tablet, if the technology has a Wi-Fi extender. A drone can cover up to 1,000 acres in just 30 minutes, offering an efficient way to monitor pastures and fields. "There aren't currently clear and specific regulations for drone usage, although they are currently being evaluated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). If a producer wants to purchase and fly a drone, they need to apply for a permit with FAA," said Oberman. It is recommended by FAA to keep the drone within 400-ft. of the ground and keep it within sight of the operator. "The United States has half the world's air traffic, which is why air regulations are so strict," said Oberman. Critics of drones worry that untrained operators will interfere with aerial planes in flight, but advocates believe the machines will soon be a big hit for farmers and ranchers. Drones could be used to improve productivity and profitability, enhancing the sustainability of the operation. As for the threat of eyes in the sky, time will tell if images taken over private farming and ranching operations can be used in investigative reporting or admissible in a court of law. By 2015, FAA is expected to have a set of regulations in place to ensure that drones are being used in a safe and responsible way.