Cowboy Church in Weld County brings Old West and new worship together heaven (and ag) sent services | TheFencePost.com

Cowboy Church in Weld County brings Old West and new worship together heaven (and ag) sent services

It's no problem if morning chores run a little late and you don't have time to change clothes before Sunday services. Cowboy Church in Lucerne, Colo. is a casual congregation that welcomes folks wearing jeans, western hats and boots — and ignores pretty much anything stuck to the bottom of the latter. Darin and Lynette Gleghorn, lead pastors, founded the fellowship in May 2000. The philosophy of Cowboy Church led the couple to the Christian group, and one another, years earlier. Gleghorn worked on a cutting horse ranch in Claremore, Okla. while attending college at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M. It was at a Cowboy Church service in April 1992 that then 24-year-old Gleghorn accepted Jesus Christ as his personal Lord and savior. In 1997, he attended a Cowboy Minister's Conference in Laughlin, Nev. where he met Lynette Peters, who was at the event as an employee of a ministerial consulting company. The two became a couple, married and moved to Texas, where they lived for about two years. They then began a traveling ministry that followed the rodeo circuit for 1 ½ years, then became associate pastors at Mountain Spring Cowboy Church in Colorado Springs, Colo. Colorado State University's ag connection draws many high school graduates from the Mountain Spring church. In May 2000, the Gleghorns were released to meet the need and begin a northern Colorado Cowboy Church. They initially held services at Vineyard Christian Fellowship, which provided use of their youth room. When more space was required, Cowboy Church moved to a large barn just outside Lucerne, where some members still team rope. Six years ago, Cowboy Church moved to its present location on Highway 85 in Lucerne. Pastor Gleghorn confirmed that initial numbers have indeed swelled, averaging 500-700 people per service. Approximately 85-90 percent are regular attendees. In an era when U.S. churches are closing at discouraging rates, Cowboy Church's doors remain optimistically wide open for several reasons. "Our vision for Cowboy Church is based on the three Rs — real, relational, relevant," Darin said. "That's who we are. People carry their worship experience with them beyond Sundays." Darin added that family values, honor and integrity, as portrayed in old-time Westerns, strengthen the authenticity of cowboy culture. If fashion choices also lend to that authenticity, then garb worn at Cowboy Church services fit right in. A typical Sunday morning service is laid back, with casual Western attire prominent. The pastor always wears a cowboy hat as he leads worship in the fellowship's building which, he unabashedly admits, is a former "honky tonk". In fact, that libation-loving establishment's bar now serves as a coffee bar, and the dance floor remains unaltered in the church's main room. However, Pastor Gleghorn was quick to clarify that the dynamic worship music is mainstream, not twangy country and western. Outside services, such as at ropings, are now very infrequent. But farming and ranching are happily commonplace at Cowboy Church, likewise all associated creatures. For example, eight years ago the Gleghorns rescued a stunted, emaciated four-year-old horse. Now 12, that mare has a lifetime home with the family. Sharing the pasture is a 30-something-year-old pony, now retired and cherished by Gleghorn children Rhett, 13, and 11-year-old Rhiatta. Church members often request prayer for their animals and many healings have resulted, reported Pastor Gleghorn. During baby dedications, a young couple ignored species differences and brought in their eight-week-old puppy! Prayers were spoken over the little canine, asking God to help it grow into a loyal and obedient dog. Many high schoolers and younger children participate in rodeo, junior bull riding and 4-H. The church secretary, Karen Walston, has horses and goats. A large percentage of Cowboy Church families work in agriculture. Young people are a high priority at Cowboy Church. Though they might dress like the Old West, they live a modern texting, tweeting lifestyle. Their generation hungrily seeks relevance from an old-school entity — the institutional church — in a new world environment. Current technology is imperative to reach them. Everything is video- and audio-recorded and especially for youth groups, live streaming and podcasts are employed. Cowboy Church youth eagerly participate in missions and community service work. For example, they are presently sorting, packaging and shipping dozens of pairs of new shoes purchased for a Belize orphanage. One girl even requested shoes be donated in lieu of birthday presents for her. Church youth also sponsor a young boy through Compassion International, a Colorado Springs-based Christian organization that works to break the cycle of poverty for needy children in 26 developing countries. Locally, the junior high kids provide monthly assistance to an organization that feeds the hungry in a Greeley park. Regular Sunday morning services are at 9 and 11 a.m. Small "Life Connect" groups meet in homes at various times. Children's church, called "Extreme Kids," is for the birth-12 years age group. A high school ministry, called "Impact," meets Sundays at 5:30 p.m. And Sundays at 11 a.m., the junior high bunch gets together under the name "Shift." Anyone seeking further information about Cowboy Church can visit online at http://www.n3c.tv, or call 970 214-4649. Visitors are sincerely welcome at all services. And remember — Jesus was born in a barn, rode a donkey and will return riding a white horse. So be sure to dress appropriately. ❖

Northern Colorado Cowboy Church delivers genuine message

Glen Smith and his wife Ann started International Western World Outreach Center, otherwise known as Rodeo Cowboy Ministries, in Midland, Texas, in 1973 after God showed him in a dream that He wanted him to begin a ministry to reach out to rodeo cowboys and share the gospel with them. Pastors Darin and Lynette Gleghorn began the Northern Colorado Cowboy Church in a rented room of a large church in Fort Collins, Colo., in 2004. When they outgrew that room, they moved to a barn near Eaton and by 2007, 300 people were worshiping there. In 2009 they bought a restaurant building at the intersection of Highways 392 and 85 in Lucerne. With mostly volunteer labor, it has been turned into a very functional church, but what makes it truly a church is the people who lead and worship there. We arrived early for the second service to find the parking lot nearly full. Starting at the door, greeters met us with a smile and warm handshake. The warm welcome continued as we made our way to the huge room where about 500 chairs were quickly filling up. It was fun to watch as people of all ages carried on conversations; genuinely happy to see each other and concerned about how they are doing. As the worship team began to play and sing, the congregation joined in, many raising their hands to praise the Lord. When the pastor began to speak of Spiritual revolution, it was in a “tell it like it is” Cowboy style, right out of the Bible. This genuine down to earth preaching is what brings people from miles around, filling the church for two services. Tuesday night is a time when cowboys traveling to rodeos can stop in to hear a message from Pastor Darin. Several people told us about the many men’s groups, women’s groups, and a monthly potluck with a lesson for older folks. There’s a nursery for little ones, kids’ church, and a youth group. Even though the pastors had a meeting, they graciously took time to talk with us. They didn’t act rushed as they looked straight into our eyes and answered questions. As we were leaving, many wished us a blessed week and asked us to come back. We believed their saying, “You are only a visitor once and after that you are family.” To learn more about NCCC, call (970) 214-4649 or email: cowboychurch_777@q.com or their website at http://www.norcocowboychurch.com. Sermons can be downloaded at http://www.sermon.net/N3C.

2008 Colorado Farm Show Exhibitors and Booth Numbers

Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 163 1031 Exchange Specialists E 65 A Dbl R Well Services E 115 A-M Valve Co, LLC. E 123-124 ABC Seamless E 55-56 ABI Irrigation E 25-29 Abilene Machine Inc. FEA E Ackerman Distributing 4-H 230 Ag Journal EC 580-582 Agland, Incorporated FEA 344-345 Agri King E 144 Agri-Enterprises E 121-122 Agri-Inject EC 613-614 AgSolutions, LLC FEA 366 AgXplore International EC 587 All Truck Sales EC 571 Allison Transmissions E 9 American Nat’l Insurance Co. EC 530 American Pride Co-op EC 594 Anderson Alfalfa Co E 138 Archer Petroleum E 70 Area Diesel Service, Inc. E 37-38 Arkansas Valley Seed 4-H B A Terrific Mechanic, Inc. FEA A & C B & G Equipment, Inc. EC 513 Bank of Colorado 4-H 216 Banner Health-North Colorado Medical Center 4-H 214-215 B-A-R Distribution Co. Inc. FEA G2 Beaver Valley Supply FEA 319-320 Bekaert Corporation E 109 Betaseed, Inc. E 77-79 Big R of Greeley EC 467-468 Bill’s Volume Sales West FEA 367-368 Blu-Jet by Thurston Mfg. Co. FEA 331-333 Bobcat of the Rockies 354-356 Bobcat of the Rockies EC 547-549, Brothers Equipment, Inc. 573-575 Brothers Equipment, Inc. 4-H 206 Buckboard Bean, Inc. E 105-107 Buckeye Welding Supply FEA G 1 Burrows Enterprises & Fisher Pumps, Inc FEA 337-339 Bush Hog FEA 322 Bushel 300, Inc. E 97 Cache Valley Select Sires FEA 327-330 Carson Trailer 357-360 Carson Trailer EC 568-569 Centennial Ag Supply FEA 376-377 Central City Scale, Inc. EC 596 Central Colo. Water Conservancy EC 566-567 Central, Inc. Booth No. Exhibitor Name EC 495-497, 521-523 Champion Dodge FEA 371-372 Clarks Ag Supply E 76 Cleanfix Reversible Fans OS Cochran Farm Supply 4-H 221 Collins Communications 4-H 232 Colorado 4-H Foundation E 42 Colorado Bean Company EC 532 Colorado Beef Council E 5 Colo. Conservation Tillage Assoc. EC 620 Colorado Corn E 66-67 Colorado Dairy Service, LLC 4-H 208 Colorado Department of Ag E 101 Colo. Division of Water Resources 4-H 218-220, 225-227 Colorado Division of Wildlife EC 562-563 Colorado East Bank & Trust EC 589-591 Colorado Equipment E 14-16 Colorado Equipment E 88-89 Colorado Farm Bureau E 1 Colorado FFA Foundation E 2 Colorado Foundation For Ag E 64 Colorado Hay & Forage Assoc. FEA 303 CHFA E 127 Colorado Land Investments E 90 Colorado Seed Growers Assoc. E 94 Colorado Soy, LLC E 8 Colo. Wheat Admin Committee E 133 Colorado Young Farmers EC 621 Cox Oil Co. 4H 222 Crop Quest, Inc. EC 583 Crossroads Insurance Agency E 135-136 Crow Valley Panels E 33 Crows Hybrid Corn Co. E 71 Custom Marketing Co., Inc. E 142 D & D Commodities Ltd E 10-12 Dairy Specialists E 63 Dairyland Laboratories E 72-74 Dixon ZTR Mowers E 128 Diversity D, Inc. 4-H C-D Double “O” Farms E 22 DTN E 160-162 Eastern Colo. Seeds/BarenbrugUSA 4-H 224 Ecoquest Independent Dlr. EC 593 Edward Jones Investments EC 2 Ehrlich Toyota E 57 Empire Irrigation, Inc. E 154 Energy Panel Structures EC 510 Evans Excavating 4-H 231 Fairbanks Equipment FEA 343 Farm Credit Leasing FEA 323 Farm Plus Financial EC 592 Farm Works Software Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 13 Farmco/High Plains Livestock EC 553 Fastline Publications E 137 Feldt Sales EC 616 Fence Post E 6 First FarmBank FEA 340 Flat Iron Steel EC 550-551,576-577 Flat River Agri, Inc EC 615 Flood & Peterson Insurance EC 558-559 Fontanelle Hybrids E 103-104 Frontier Glove Co. EC E G&M Implement, Inc. EC 607 Garnsey & Wheeler Ford E 145-150 Garnsey & Wheeler Ford EC 557 Garst Seed Co. E 155-158 General Air FEA 334 Genesis Soil Rite Calcium/ Midstates Consulting E 68 Genex Cooperative FEA 361-363 GFC EC 552 Giant Rubber Water Tanks FEA 301-302 Golden Harvest/JC Robinson Seed Company 4-H 210-211 Grand Valley Hybrids E 115 Great Plains Meters FEA B1 Great Plains Mfg., Inc. OS Great West Trailer & Truck Sales E 111 Greeley Independence Stampede EC 608 Guaranty Bank and Trust FEA 309-310 H2O Power Equipment Inc E 53 Hagie Mfg. Company FEA L 1 Harsh International, Inc. EC 595, E 17 High Plains Journal E 143 Hill Petroleum EC 512 Hilleshog/Syngenta Seed EC 556 Hitchcock, Inc. E 117 Hotsy Equip of No. Colo. 4-H 234 Hydropedes E 151-153 Hydroscreen EC 579 Interstate Energy Inc. 4-H 223 J&T Country Feeds FEA B2 JJ Equipment/Brillion/Rhino EC D John Deere E 130 Johnstown Clothing& Embroidery 4-H A Kaput Products-Ridarodent FEA 335-336, 351-352 KD Loaders FEA B1 KP Sales and Marketing Inc EC 619 Kreps Wiedeman E 164 KSIR Radio EC 555 Kugler Company EC 3 Kuhn-Knight Mfg. EC 525-526 Larson Metal Inc. EC 528-529 Lawson Products Inc EC 586 Lefever Building Systems 4-H 203 Legacy Land Trust E 125-126 Lewton Ag Services/Nitro Sprayers E 93 LG Seeds Booth No. Exhibitor Name FEA 311 Loveland Distribution FEA L2 Luther Equipment FEA D MacDon, Inc. E 86-87 Magnum Manufacturing/ Woodys Pivot Service FEA 369-370 Maize Corp/Kearney Equip EC 508 Maxey Companies, Inc. EC 564 Mel Brown Farm Supply EC 578 Metrogro EC 599-602 MHC Kenworth E 32 Mid West Truck Parts EC 537 Midwest Seed Genetics 4-H 233 Miracle Ear FEA 373 Moly Mfg, Inc./Silencer EC 534-536 Monosem E 112-113 Monsanto FEA 315-316 Moreta Company, Inc. E 84 Morgan CC-Agri & Bus Mgmt. FEA 307-308 Mortec Industries, Inc. EC 527 Morton Buildings, Inc. EC 539 Mountain Plains Farm Credit EC 531 NAPA Parts E 95 Nat’l. Farmers Union Insurance E 75 Nations Pipe & Steel E 54 Navigator E 59 NC+ Hybrids E 92 Neb. College of Technical Ag E 129 Netafim USA EC 617-618 New Frontier Bank EC 511 NK Brand Seed of Syngenta E 102 No-Bull Enterprises E 7 Northeastern Jr. College FEA 317 Northern Colo. Driveline Service EC 506-507 No. Colo. Water Conservancy EC 478-480, 492-494 Orthman Mfg. EC 517-518, 543-544 Outback Guidance 4-H 201 Paradise Landscaping FEA 326 Paul’s Custom Grinding Svc. E 30-31 Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc. 4-H 205 P-Diamond Irrigation Sales, Svc. E 91 Petersen Mfg Co. Inc EC 498 PGS Hybrids, Inc. FEA 306 Pickett Equipment E 118-120 Pioneer, A Dupont Co. E 21 Pivots Plus 4-H 223 Pletcher Enterprises E 99-100 Poudre Valley Co-Op Seed Div. FEA 324-225 Poudre Valley Co-Op/ Hutchison Western FEA 336 Poudre Valley REA EC 561 Poulsen Ace Hardware FEA G3 Power Equipment Co. 4-H Prairie Dog Man E 52 Producer’s Choice Seed/PGI FEA 318 Pure Ag Products Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 43-45 Quality Well & Pump EC 588 Rabo AgriFinance EC 502-503 Ranch-Way Feeds 4-H 207 Red Wing Shoes E 39 Regent Broadcasting K99 (KUAD-FM) E 18-19 Reinke Manufacturing EC 524 Reliance Industrial Products E 49 Reliv, International EC 603-605 Renewable Fiber FEA B2 Rhino-Brillion EC 471-473, 485-487 RHS/Bestway E 98 Ritchey Mfg E 41 Robinson Hay Company EC 584-585 Rky. Mtn. Cleaning Systems EC 538 Rky. Mtn. Water Environ Assoc. FEA 313 Rodenator EC 572 Rodman & Company, Inc. EC 554 Roggen Farmers Elevator Assn. EC C Ron’s Equipment Co. Inc. 4-H 212 Rural Community Ins. Svcs. EC 514-516, 540-542 Schaben Industries 4-H 209 Schaeffer Oil & Grease Co. EC 469-471, 483-484 Schlagel Mfg. E 96 Schmidt’s Bakery & Deli E 46 Schroeder’s Tire E 159 SFR HiTech Lubricants E 80-81 Sharp Bros. Seed EC 499-501 Shield Ag Equipment FEA 312 Shur-Co E 47 Silveus Insurance Group E 34-36 Simplot Soilbuilders 4-H 204 Soil Savers E 62 Soybest EC 607, E 145-150 Spradley-Barr OS Stampede Steel FEA 314 Starco Mfg EC 570 Stewart & Stevenson FEA 375 Stinger Ltd. EC 509 Stockton Roofing E 131 Strategic Financial Mgmt. EC 519-520, 545-546 Sutherland Lumber Co. EC 505 Synthetic Resources, Inc. FEA 346-350 T&B Welding & Trailers, LLC EC 597 Tarps Unlimited EC 481-482 Tidenberg Welding & Repair EC 565 Tire Pro FEA 304-305 Tool & Anchor Supply E 134 Toro Micro-Irrigation EC 504 TractorHouse EC 1 Transwest Trailers Booth No. Exhibitor Name FEA 378-380 Triple C, Inc. Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 69 Triumph Seed FEA 364-365 Tru Blu, LLC E 82-83 Twin Peaks Powersports EC 598 U.S.D.A. Colo. Ag Statistics E 85 USDA Farm Service Agency E 50-51 USDA National Appeals Div. E 114 UNI Design E 139-141 Valley Irrigation of Greeley EC 560 Vander Wal Dairy S & S E 3-4 Viaero Wireless EC B Wagner Ag/Wagner Rents E 23-24 Walco Animal Health E 110 Warren Analytical Laboratory FEA 342 Water Colorado, LLC E 60-61 WDPA/ Northern Colo. Dairyettes FEA G4 & G5 Weiss Master Mfg. 4-H 217 Weld County Drug Task Force E 48 Weld County Fair EC 606 Weld County Garage 4-H 202 Weld County Public Works Dept/Weed & Pest 4-H 228 Weld County Sheriff’s Office E 108 West Greeley Conservation District E 132 West Plains Grain EC 609-610 Western Irrigation EC 611-612 Western Material Handling E 20 Whatwire Broadband EC A Wickham Tractor Co./Krone E 40 Wild West Motorsport E 58 Wilson Trailer Sales 4-H 229 Wingfoot Commercial Tire systems EC 533 WW Auctions & Real Estate EC 474-477, 488-491 Wylie Sprayers FEA 374 Xpect Solutions, Inc. Legend e exhibition building fea farm equipment area 4-H 4-h building ec event center os outside

2008 Colorado Farm Show Exhibitors and Booth Numbers

Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 163 1031 Exchange Specialists E 65 A Dbl R Well Services E 115 A-M Valve Co, LLC. E 123-124 ABC Seamless E 55-56 ABI Irrigation E 25-29 Abilene Machine Inc. FEA E Ackerman Distributing 4-H 230 Ag Journal EC 580-582 Agland, Incorporated FEA 344-345 Agri King E 144 Agri-Enterprises E 121-122 Agri-Inject EC 613-614 AgSolutions, LLC FEA 366 AgXplore International EC 587 All Truck Sales EC 571 Allison Transmissions E 9 American Nat’l Insurance Co. EC 530 American Pride Co-op EC 594 Anderson Alfalfa Co E 138 Archer Petroleum E 70 Area Diesel Service, Inc. E 37-38 Arkansas Valley Seed 4-H B A Terrific Mechanic, Inc. FEA A & C B & G Equipment, Inc. EC 513 Bank of Colorado 4-H 216 Banner Health-North Colorado Medical Center 4-H 214-215 B-A-R Distribution Co. Inc. FEA G2 Beaver Valley Supply FEA 319-320 Bekaert Corporation E 109 Betaseed, Inc. E 77-79 Big R of Greeley EC 467-468 Bill’s Volume Sales West FEA 367-368 Blu-Jet by Thurston Mfg. Co. FEA 331-333 Bobcat of the Rockies 354-356 Bobcat of the Rockies EC 547-549, Brothers Equipment, Inc. 573-575 Brothers Equipment, Inc. 4-H 206 Buckboard Bean, Inc. E 105-107 Buckeye Welding Supply FEA G 1 Burrows Enterprises & Fisher Pumps, Inc FEA 337-339 Bush Hog FEA 322 Bushel 300, Inc. E 97 Cache Valley Select Sires FEA 327-330 Carson Trailer 357-360 Carson Trailer EC 568-569 Centennial Ag Supply FEA 376-377 Central City Scale, Inc. EC 596 Central Colo. Water Conservancy EC 566-567 Central, Inc. Booth No. Exhibitor Name EC 495-497, 521-523 Champion Dodge FEA 371-372 Clarks Ag Supply E 76 Cleanfix Reversible Fans OS Cochran Farm Supply 4-H 221 Collins Communications 4-H 232 Colorado 4-H Foundation E 42 Colorado Bean Company EC 532 Colorado Beef Council E 5 Colo. Conservation Tillage Assoc. EC 620 Colorado Corn E 66-67 Colorado Dairy Service, LLC 4-H 208 Colorado Department of Ag E 101 Colo. Division of Water Resources 4-H 218-220, 225-227 Colorado Division of Wildlife EC 562-563 Colorado East Bank & Trust EC 589-591 Colorado Equipment E 14-16 Colorado Equipment E 88-89 Colorado Farm Bureau E 1 Colorado FFA Foundation E 2 Colorado Foundation For Ag E 64 Colorado Hay & Forage Assoc. FEA 303 CHFA E 127 Colorado Land Investments E 90 Colorado Seed Growers Assoc. E 94 Colorado Soy, LLC E 8 Colo. Wheat Admin Committee E 133 Colorado Young Farmers EC 621 Cox Oil Co. 4H 222 Crop Quest, Inc. EC 583 Crossroads Insurance Agency E 135-136 Crow Valley Panels E 33 Crows Hybrid Corn Co. E 71 Custom Marketing Co., Inc. E 142 D & D Commodities Ltd E 10-12 Dairy Specialists E 63 Dairyland Laboratories E 72-74 Dixon ZTR Mowers E 128 Diversity D, Inc. 4-H C-D Double “O” Farms E 22 DTN E 160-162 Eastern Colo. Seeds/BarenbrugUSA 4-H 224 Ecoquest Independent Dlr. EC 593 Edward Jones Investments EC 2 Ehrlich Toyota E 57 Empire Irrigation, Inc. E 154 Energy Panel Structures EC 510 Evans Excavating 4-H 231 Fairbanks Equipment FEA 343 Farm Credit Leasing FEA 323 Farm Plus Financial EC 592 Farm Works Software Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 13 Farmco/High Plains Livestock EC 553 Fastline Publications E 137 Feldt Sales EC 616 Fence Post E 6 First FarmBank FEA 340 Flat Iron Steel EC 550-551,576-577 Flat River Agri, Inc EC 615 Flood & Peterson Insurance EC 558-559 Fontanelle Hybrids E 103-104 Frontier Glove Co. EC E G&M Implement, Inc. EC 607 Garnsey & Wheeler Ford E 145-150 Garnsey & Wheeler Ford EC 557 Garst Seed Co. E 155-158 General Air FEA 334 Genesis Soil Rite Calcium/ Midstates Consulting E 68 Genex Cooperative FEA 361-363 GFC EC 552 Giant Rubber Water Tanks FEA 301-302 Golden Harvest/JC Robinson Seed Company 4-H 210-211 Grand Valley Hybrids E 115 Great Plains Meters FEA B1 Great Plains Mfg., Inc. OS Great West Trailer & Truck Sales E 111 Greeley Independence Stampede EC 608 Guaranty Bank and Trust FEA 309-310 H2O Power Equipment Inc E 53 Hagie Mfg. Company FEA L 1 Harsh International, Inc. EC 595, E 17 High Plains Journal E 143 Hill Petroleum EC 512 Hilleshog/Syngenta Seed EC 556 Hitchcock, Inc. E 117 Hotsy Equip of No. Colo. 4-H 234 Hydropedes E 151-153 Hydroscreen EC 579 Interstate Energy Inc. 4-H 223 J&T Country Feeds FEA B2 JJ Equipment/Brillion/Rhino EC D John Deere E 130 Johnstown Clothing& Embroidery 4-H A Kaput Products-Ridarodent FEA 335-336, 351-352 KD Loaders FEA B1 KP Sales and Marketing Inc EC 619 Kreps Wiedeman E 164 KSIR Radio EC 555 Kugler Company EC 3 Kuhn-Knight Mfg. EC 525-526 Larson Metal Inc. EC 528-529 Lawson Products Inc EC 586 Lefever Building Systems 4-H 203 Legacy Land Trust E 125-126 Lewton Ag Services/Nitro Sprayers E 93 LG Seeds Booth No. Exhibitor Name FEA 311 Loveland Distribution FEA L2 Luther Equipment FEA D MacDon, Inc. E 86-87 Magnum Manufacturing/ Woodys Pivot Service FEA 369-370 Maize Corp/Kearney Equip EC 508 Maxey Companies, Inc. EC 564 Mel Brown Farm Supply EC 578 Metrogro EC 599-602 MHC Kenworth E 32 Mid West Truck Parts EC 537 Midwest Seed Genetics 4-H 233 Miracle Ear FEA 373 Moly Mfg, Inc./Silencer EC 534-536 Monosem E 112-113 Monsanto FEA 315-316 Moreta Company, Inc. E 84 Morgan CC-Agri & Bus Mgmt. FEA 307-308 Mortec Industries, Inc. EC 527 Morton Buildings, Inc. EC 539 Mountain Plains Farm Credit EC 531 NAPA Parts E 95 Nat’l. Farmers Union Insurance E 75 Nations Pipe & Steel E 54 Navigator E 59 NC+ Hybrids E 92 Neb. College of Technical Ag E 129 Netafim USA EC 617-618 New Frontier Bank EC 511 NK Brand Seed of Syngenta E 102 No-Bull Enterprises E 7 Northeastern Jr. College FEA 317 Northern Colo. Driveline Service EC 506-507 No. Colo. Water Conservancy EC 478-480, 492-494 Orthman Mfg. EC 517-518, 543-544 Outback Guidance 4-H 201 Paradise Landscaping FEA 326 Paul’s Custom Grinding Svc. E 30-31 Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc. 4-H 205 P-Diamond Irrigation Sales, Svc. E 91 Petersen Mfg Co. Inc EC 498 PGS Hybrids, Inc. FEA 306 Pickett Equipment E 118-120 Pioneer, A Dupont Co. E 21 Pivots Plus 4-H 223 Pletcher Enterprises E 99-100 Poudre Valley Co-Op Seed Div. FEA 324-225 Poudre Valley Co-Op/ Hutchison Western FEA 336 Poudre Valley REA EC 561 Poulsen Ace Hardware FEA G3 Power Equipment Co. 4-H Prairie Dog Man E 52 Producer’s Choice Seed/PGI FEA 318 Pure Ag Products Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 43-45 Quality Well & Pump EC 588 Rabo AgriFinance EC 502-503 Ranch-Way Feeds 4-H 207 Red Wing Shoes E 39 Regent Broadcasting K99 (KUAD-FM) E 18-19 Reinke Manufacturing EC 524 Reliance Industrial Products E 49 Reliv, International EC 603-605 Renewable Fiber FEA B2 Rhino-Brillion EC 471-473, 485-487 RHS/Bestway E 98 Ritchey Mfg E 41 Robinson Hay Company EC 584-585 Rky. Mtn. Cleaning Systems EC 538 Rky. Mtn. Water Environ Assoc. FEA 313 Rodenator EC 572 Rodman & Company, Inc. EC 554 Roggen Farmers Elevator Assn. EC C Ron’s Equipment Co. Inc. 4-H 212 Rural Community Ins. Svcs. EC 514-516, 540-542 Schaben Industries 4-H 209 Schaeffer Oil & Grease Co. EC 469-471, 483-484 Schlagel Mfg. E 96 Schmidt’s Bakery & Deli E 46 Schroeder’s Tire E 159 SFR HiTech Lubricants E 80-81 Sharp Bros. Seed EC 499-501 Shield Ag Equipment FEA 312 Shur-Co E 47 Silveus Insurance Group E 34-36 Simplot Soilbuilders 4-H 204 Soil Savers E 62 Soybest EC 607, E 145-150 Spradley-Barr OS Stampede Steel FEA 314 Starco Mfg EC 570 Stewart & Stevenson FEA 375 Stinger Ltd. EC 509 Stockton Roofing E 131 Strategic Financial Mgmt. EC 519-520, 545-546 Sutherland Lumber Co. EC 505 Synthetic Resources, Inc. FEA 346-350 T&B Welding & Trailers, LLC EC 597 Tarps Unlimited EC 481-482 Tidenberg Welding & Repair EC 565 Tire Pro FEA 304-305 Tool & Anchor Supply E 134 Toro Micro-Irrigation EC 504 TractorHouse EC 1 Transwest Trailers Booth No. Exhibitor Name FEA 378-380 Triple C, Inc. Booth No. Exhibitor Name E 69 Triumph Seed FEA 364-365 Tru Blu, LLC E 82-83 Twin Peaks Powersports EC 598 U.S.D.A. Colo. Ag Statistics E 85 USDA Farm Service Agency E 50-51 USDA National Appeals Div. E 114 UNI Design E 139-141 Valley Irrigation of Greeley EC 560 Vander Wal Dairy S & S E 3-4 Viaero Wireless EC B Wagner Ag/Wagner Rents E 23-24 Walco Animal Health E 110 Warren Analytical Laboratory FEA 342 Water Colorado, LLC E 60-61 WDPA/ Northern Colo. Dairyettes FEA G4 & G5 Weiss Master Mfg. 4-H 217 Weld County Drug Task Force E 48 Weld County Fair EC 606 Weld County Garage 4-H 202 Weld County Public Works Dept/Weed & Pest 4-H 228 Weld County Sheriff’s Office E 108 West Greeley Conservation District E 132 West Plains Grain EC 609-610 Western Irrigation EC 611-612 Western Material Handling E 20 Whatwire Broadband EC A Wickham Tractor Co./Krone E 40 Wild West Motorsport E 58 Wilson Trailer Sales 4-H 229 Wingfoot Commercial Tire systems EC 533 WW Auctions & Real Estate EC 474-477, 488-491 Wylie Sprayers FEA 374 Xpect Solutions, Inc. Legend e exhibition building fea farm equipment area 4-H 4-h building ec event center os outside

Baby Chick Season is Upon Us

You know that spring is fast approaching when the farm & ranch stores and your local feed dealer start advertising that chicks are in. This morning alone, I have been in two stores that had a tank set up with heat lamps over it and a collection of the “few-day old” chirpers inside of the tank. When the baby chicks are that young it is difficult to look at them and know what they will be like as mature chickens. As chicks, they are basically yellow, black, or a mixture of the two. So often you will hear someone asking a clerk, “What will it be when it grows up?” or “Will that be one of those fuzzy footed chickens?” There are dozens upon dozens of chicken breeds, crossbreeds, and varieties within breeds; however, I thought I might pick out some of the basic core breeds that are seen locally and give a brief description of their purpose. Dutch Bantam: The Dutch Bantam is a very active bird and they tend to be hardy creatures. They are a small chicken, with mature birds weighing as little as 18 to 20 ounces. The hens are known to be good egg layers that make aggressively good mothers, but they often have small litters due to the fact that their own size means that they can only keep a few eggs covered. The Bantam egg is small and it is believed that this is the reason for the bird’s popularity across Europe. During colonial times landlords would take the largest eggs from their tenants, but the people on the land would be permitted to keep their Bantam eggs. There are numerous varieties of Bantams with more than 18 varieties in the US alone. Brahma: Light, Dark, & Buff make up the three varieties of Brahma chickens. These tend to be large birds with mature roosters nearing 11 or 12 pounds and the mature hen weighing 8 to 10 pounds. The Brahma chickens will have small feathers running down their leg shanks and onto their toes, helping them to withstand cold temperatures. This characteristic has also earned them a moniker as one of the “fuzzy footed chickens”. Additionally, they have a small wattle and comb, which also helps limit heat loss during cold spells. The Brahma eggs will have a brown shell. Leghorn: The more than a dozen varieties of Leghorns combine to make Leghorns the most common chickens in the US; and this breed makes up the root of most of our commercial egg production. That hint should give away that the Leghorns lay white eggs. At maturity, roosters should average 6 pounds, while hens may be around 4 1/2 pounds. Given the opportunity, these birds are actively mobile both when walking and in short flights. They like to roost in trees and in barn rafters. The Leghorns are excellent foragers and during much of the year they can find most of their nutritional needs while free ranging. In contrast to the Brahma, the Leghorn has a large wattle & comb, assisting it in dissipating excess body heat during very warm periods. The Leghorns are known to be noisy chickens and are ill-advised for those people with close neighbors who may not like a morning wake-up call. Orpington: There are four basic varieties of Orpington chickens: Black, Blue, Buff, & White; but the varieties should always be a solid color. Mature roosters may reach 10 pounds with mature hens slightly less at 8 pounds. Their heavy feathers can make these birds appear much larger. The Orpingtons are popular as both an egg layer (laying a brown shelled egg) and as a meat chicken. They tend to be docile birds and the hens make good mothers; yet, the chicks are not very vigorous and can lose out to other breeds of chicks when mixed. Sussex: Another dual purpose (egg & meat) breed is the Sussex. While very popular in Canada & England, often this breed is considered to not be a popular breed in the US; however, many recent Sussex crossbreeds are appearing on the US market. These strong foragers will produce mature hens & roosters to 7 & 9 pounds, respectively. The Sussex hens also make really good mothers. Wyandottes: The roughly nine varieties of Wyandottes provide numerous colorful chicken patterns to choose from. The Wyandottes should have a rose comb. It resists freezing better than the single comb. In some cases a single comb Wyandotte may hatch out. It is not recommended that these be kept in the breeding flock. The Wyandottes have a reputation for making a good family flock or youth project with their family friendly disposition, rugged capabilities, and being strong dual purpose birds. The Wyandotte hens lay brown eggs and have strong mothering abilities; however, they are prone to having poor hatches. One can expect that mature hens will weigh about 6 1/2 pounds with mature roosters being about 2 pounds heavier. This has been just a brief description on a half dozen of the core chicken breeds that you might find on the local market. There are countless more breeds to choose from. Oklahoma State University has a very good website called Poultry Breeds (http://139.78.104.1/breeds/poultry/), should you want to look up other breeds of chickens or explore some of the duck, turkey, or goose breeds.

Cattlemen for Christ: spreading more than just faith

by Molly Johnson Fence Post Intern It’s not your average Sunday at the rodeo fairgrounds, but the occurrence of these events are definitely becoming more noticeable ” Cowboy Church Services. For the past couple of years, Cattlemen for Christ (CFC), a non-denominational organization, has been making its mark in Colorado. Whether the volunteers of CFC were serving traveling cowboys at the Greeley Independence Stampede or encouraging Weld County families to gather on Sunday mornings for worship at the County Fair, their message of faith has been spreading like a wildfire across Colorado. That’s not all that has been spreading though … over 20 years ago, Clair Orr established CFC in Colorado with the desire of making a positive difference in the agricultural community by providing a network of support, love, encouragement, prayer and other resources that assist in accomplishing God’s work. A non-profit organization, CFC is staffed by volunteers who have a burden in their heart for the people of the land. The first service, which was held in Greeley at the Cattlemen’s Convention a little less than 20 years ago, had fewer than 10 people in attendance. Since then, CFC has become a tradition at the Greeley Independence Stampede and at other events around Colorado. This year, over 1,200 people were in attendance for the Cowboy Church Service at the Stampede. Each year, traveling cowboys visit the Stampede and attend the church service. As they return home, they realize the opportunity to invite others to a service like this to share in a bond of fellowship is something worth investing a little time in. Across the country, CFC organizations have been popping up to spread the “Good News” of Jesus … particularly to agricultural communities. “What’s exciting to me is to see the Lord raising up men and women to continue this into other areas, that’s a blessing for me,” said Orr, founder and past president of CFC, about the “spread” of CFC into other states. At this year’s Stampede, the Cowboy Church Service drew a diverse crowd. People from different walks of life gathered in the grandstands for a worship service that transformed the dirt-filled arena into a sanctuary of music, laughter, tears, prayers, love, hope and faith. The service opened with a welcome and prayer from Orr. “We’re fortunate to have the freedom to gather in the grandstands, praise your name and call this a church,” said Orr. Orr reiterated that “We’re here to honor God and country.” After Sept. 11 last year, patriotism is on the rise and Americans are standing their ground. Orr read a passage from “Great moments with Mr. Lincoln,” where he emphasized the fact that liberty must become the political religion of the nation where we all agree that liberty is the best part of being American. Following a reading called, “I am the flag,” the large crowd stood proudly and gallantly pledged to the nation’s oldest trademark ” the red, white and blue. For Orr, the Cowboy Church Service is the highlight of his time at the Stampede. “It’s heartfelt, the people come because they really want to be here, it’s really uplifting that this may be the eternal salvation for those who haven’t heard the gospel,” said Orr. The worship service also included inspirational music by a group called “Last Minute Groove” from Fort Collins. After the group left the trailer a’rockin’, someone from the audience screamed out, “They can come back any time!” Jerry Schimmel gave his testimony by telling how he got from “Point A” in his life to “Point B,” meaning, how he was transformed from a non-believer into a strong Christian. Thirteen years ago, on June 19, 1989, Jerry survived a fatal plane crash that killed 112 people out of 296 on board the plane. He wasn’t supposed to be on that plane, but as a standby passenger on a business trip, Jerry and his boss reserved the last two seats on a full airplane. The airplane’s right main engine exploded and was non-functional, forcing the plane to make an emergency landing in Sioux City, Iowa. Jerry managed to escape the burning wreckage of the aircraft, but moments later, he re-entered the plane to rescue a crying infant. Jerry said he never really thought of himself as a “hero,” and that he never really thought surviving a plane wreck could be so traumatizing. “For a 10-month period after the crash, there was a downward spiral in my life that I couldn’t stop,” Jerry said. “For the first time in the 30 years of my life, I had been knocked down and couldn’t pick myself back up.” Jerry was suffering from shock, depression, survivor’s guilt and anger. Prior to the crash, Jerry said he had no spiritual foundation. After months of anxiety, depression and a broken marriage, he decided he couldn’t handle the hopelessness anymore. He sat in his bedroom, head in hands and offered up a prayer, “God, please give me something to hold onto.” Jerry took his first step in becoming a Christian that day, and is still going strong for the Lord. “God was all I needed,” he said. Following Jerry’s testimony, the crowd greeted each other, rubbed shoulders with neighbors and met new friends. They filed out of the stadium with a breath of fresh air in their lungs and a message of hope in their hearts. The service brought a spiritual atmosphere to the community, and paraded the independence of our country in a whole new light. “It’s what life is really about,” said Jason Kraft, Colorado Cattlemen for Christ president. “Rodeo doesn’t last past death, this is eternal.”

Church’s Chicken signs franchise development deal with Goalz Restaurant Group

ATLANTA, Ga. — Church's Chicken announced that it has entered into a multi-year, development deal with Goalz Restaurant Group, LLC to develop 20 Church's Chicken restaurants per year in six states. The agreement, which will affect expansion in Florida, Kentucky, Ohio, Colorado, North Carolina and South Carolina, is the largest ever with a single operator, and marks a historic achievement in Church's quest to become the global franchisor of choice. For the new development deal, Shawn Eby, president of Goalz Restaurant Group, partnered with American Development Partners for development of the restaurants. ADP will invest capital to fund real estate acquisitions, construction and design. ADP will be Goalz build-to-suit landlord. Eby has more than 30 years of quick-service restaurant operations experience and will oversee the operations of each restaurant as they are developed. "I believe Church's Chicken's strong brand will back the success of these new restaurants," Eby said. "Due to Church's 65-year legacy, I am confident in making such a significant commitment. Their quality product, store design, operational model and management team are the key reasons we are making this investment" "The Goalz Restaurant Group has a proven history that fits perfectly with Church's domestic expansion strategy," said Tony Moralejo, executive vice president of International Business and Global Development at Church's Chicken. "This development deal will substantially grow the number of guests who can enjoy our signature quality food and great chicken experiences." Church's Chicken was founded in San Antonio, Texas, in 1952, by George W. Church, Church's (along with its sister brand Texas Chicken outside the Americas) has more than 1,600 locations in 27 countries and international territories and system-wide sales of more than $1 billion. For more information, visit http://www.churchs.com. Follow Church's® on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/churchschicken and Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/churchschicken.

Cowboy church kicks up its heels on the Western Slope

It seems only fitting that because Jesus was born in a manger, church ought to be held in a barn. That’s one opinion of a group of people launching the first cowboy church in Mesa County. “We are a regular church,” said Roslyn Walter, whose husband, Colton, preaches when he’s not training horses in Mesa. “We believe in the Bible and we seek the Bible as our direction for truth.” It’s similar to a regular service in that the congregation sings songs and a minister preaches. “The worship service is not that hugely different,” Walter said. “We just want to make sure people don’t have to put on their Sunday best.” The group breaks from tradition in how they dress for church (they can wear soiled jeans, a work shirt and boots), where they worship (any barn or pickup tailgate will do) and which horses or greased pigs they’ll bring to the service. The church is affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention “because it gives us a group of people who also believe the Bible as sole authority,” Walter said. “And because they believe the local church is run by local individuals. “In the cowboy church we want people to learn for themselves from the Bible, not another person,” Walter said. Eventually, the Walters would like to launch cowboy churches elsewhere, with the impetus from local residents. “Our goal is to get people growing with the Lord and then they take over the church,” Walter said. “If there’s one in Delta, Colton will help get it started.” Walter described the cowboy church as a place “full of dirt, horses and sometimes sweat and blood, where cowboys and cowgirls get together to jointly worship God together. The goal is to seek truth as it is written in the Bible. They seek the Bible’s authority rather than the words of men. “They study the Bible around a campfire or maybe the back of a pickup truck or in the dirt after being piled by someone else’s favorite little pony. The desire is that cowboys and cowgirls come to know Jesus Christ as their personal savior, grow in Christ from being banded together with Him, that their lives will reflect Christ and that they would gather lost souls while seeking to serve Him. They do fun stuff like dressing goats or racing horses or catching greasy pigs, but they do it for a higher purpose of glorifying God.” Round Pen Cowboy Church meets for the first time Sunday in Ron and Mary Groves’ indoor riding arena at K & 20 roads near Fruita. For information, call Colton Walter at 268-5650. Also, http://youtube.com/watch?v=W2UeXNt7dts or http://www.cowboycn.org.

Rocky Mountain Obituaries

, age 75, of Keenesburg, Colo., died Dec. 15, 2006, at his home. He was born at home in Bird City, Kan., to Glenn and Minnie Johnson. He attended and graduated from Brewster High School in 1951. Leo enlisted in the Air Force along with his twin brother, Lee, in 1951. They went to basic training in Texas, and served four years in Great Falls, Mont. On Jan. 16, 1954, he married Pearl Peterson in Great Falls. They were married for 53 years. Leo and Lee and their families moved to Denver, Colo., after their discharge from the service. Leo worked as a drain layer and a carpenter. In 1967, he was hired by United Airlines as a fueler. He retired from the company after 30 years of service. He loved to build and do woodworking as a hobby. Other hobbies were fishing, hunting, watching his children and grandchildren in rodeos, and many sports. He enjoyed raising and racing greyhounds with his twin brother, and raising black labs for field trials. He was a devoted family man and enjoyed the outdoors. Leo and Pearl lived in the Brighton area for 38 years, and then moved to Keenesburg 10 years ago, where he lived until his death. He is survived by his wife, Pearl; three children: Debra and husband Ray Strong of Greeley, Colo., Lanette and husband Pat Walker of Hudson, Colo., and Kenny and wife Sandie Johnson of Keenesburg; and four grandchildren. He is also survived by one sister, LaNora Jackson, and one brother, LaVern “Buck” Johnson and sister-in-law Glessner Johnson. Leo was preceded in death by his parents and two daughters, Linda and Cheryl Johnson; his twin brother, Lee Johnson; brother Glen Johnson; brother-in-law Kenneth Jackson and nephew Lonnie Johnson. Services were held on Dec. 27. A graveside service was also held at Fort Logan National Cemetery. , age 47, was born on Oct. 7, 1959, to Edward Leon Mekelburg Jr. and Doris (Rutledge) Mekelburg. He was born in Yuma (Colorado) Hospital and was raised on the family farm northeast of Yuma. He attended Yuma public schools, graduating with the class of 1978. He then attended Morgan Community College for two years. After attending college, Mike came back home and began farming with his father, Leon, and his uncle Don Rutledge. Mike was involved in Cub Scouts and 4-H, as a young person. He was a member of the Yuma FFA chapter all four years of high school. He won Grand Champion Hog at the Yuma County Fair in 1977. Mike was a member of St. John’s Lutheran Church. In June of 1983, Mike married Lisabeth Bornmann, and to this union one daughter, Ashley Ann, was born. Mike and Liz dissolved their marriage in 1986. In 1994, Mike married Rhonda Wiltfang. To this union, a daughter, Alex Faith, was born. Mike also adopted Cody Matthew into the family. Mike was a loving person and was never ashamed to say “I love you” to family and friends. He was a very special person. Mike inherited his love of farming and fishing from his grandfather, Stanley Rutledge. they spent many an hour together driving tractors, checking cattle, or sitting on a river bank, or in a boat on a lake with a fishing pole in their hands. He is survived by his wife, Rhonda; daughters Ashley and Alex, and son Cody; mother Doris Mekelburg, and sister Deb and husband Ron Higgins; children Travis and Bonnie Rogers and sons; Ryanne and Ryan Smith; Cassidee and Jed Gleghorn. He is also survived by brothers Randy and wife Teri, and daughters Paige and Kali; Dick and wife Dori and children Nikki, Corey and Shae; Dave and children Hilary and Tate; Tom and wife Kristi and children Kiera, Mariya, Lainey and Jailyn; and many loving aunts, uncles, cousins and dear friends. Memorial services were held Dec. 12. , age 98, a longtime area resident of Brush, Colo., died Jan. 3, 2007, at Eben Ezer Lutheran Care Center in Brush. She was born March 1, 1908, in Lincoln, Neb., to James and Lottie (Miller) Witter. In 1916, the family moved to Simpson, 30 miles south of Brush. She attended Woodrow High School, and later Brush High School, where she graduated. She attended the state teachers college later that summer, where she received her teaching certificate. She taught school in the Burdett community. Grace married Elmer Hollinger on June 6, 1928. They later divorced. She was a member of the Snyder Methodist Church, where she also taught Sunday School and served on the Snyder Ladies Aid. She was a 4-H leader for a number of years, and was a caretaker for several area residents. She enjoyed crocheting, reading, cooking and baking. She was also an avid writer. Grace is survived by her five children: Robert E. Hollinger of Ranchester, Wyo., Bertha L. Woodward of Loveland, Colo., Irene M. Vancil of Brush, Colo., Mavis A. Falls of Waco, Texas, and Ellen L. Lisman of Torrington, Wyo.; 18 grandchildren; and several great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. She is also survived by one sister, Ada Schon of Colorado Springs, Colo. She was preceded in death by her parents, three sisters: Doris Lindstrom, Frances Carr, and Charlotte Krogh; and one great-grandson, Jacob Hastings. Services were held Jan. 6 with interment at Brush Memorial Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Jake Hastings Memorial Scholarship Fund at the Bank of Colorado in Brush. of Loveland, Colo., died peacefully on Jan. 9, 2007, at Sylvan Dale Guest Ranch, her home for 60 years. Born Mayme Inez Tomlinson on Feb. 13, 1913, in Big Flat, Ark., she moved with her parents and three sisters to Colorado during the Great Depression. Despite achieving highest academic honors at Ault High School, finances prevented her from attending college. Mayme married Maurice Jessup in 1938. He preceded her in death in 1993. Tillie is survived by her children: David and Susan, who continue to run the ranch; five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. She is also survived by two sisters, Zee Jackson of Metaire, La., and Maggie Stewart of Greeley, Colo. A private family cremation service has been scheduled. A memorial service will be held in May. Friends who wish may donate to the Legacy Land Trust, Larimer County Hospice, or the Mennonite Disaster Service in care of Resthaven Funeral Home, 8426 S. Highway 287, Fort Collins, Colo., 80525. Please visit MeM.com to send tributes to the family and read the complete story of Mayme Inez Jessup’s life. , age 78, of Denver. Colo., died Jan. 10, 2007, at her home. The youngest of six children, she was born July 18, 1928, in Denver, to Paul and Nellie Sibley. She grew up in Denver, graduating from South High School. Last summer, she attended her 50th high school reunion. Pauline married Thomas R. Greene (who preceded her in death) in Denver in 1947. They had four children together: Connie, Rick, Paula, and Mike. Pauline worked for Denver Public Schools for 20 years as a secretary in the Evaluation and Testing Department until her retirement. In 1980, she married Alfred Jenni and gained his three sons and their wives into her family. Pauline enjoyed traveling, golfing, going to Las Vegas, taking her grandchildren and children to the swimming pool, and the Denver Zoo. An avid and fiercely loyal Denver Broncos fan, she was able to attend one Super Bowl, and watching them win with John Elway meant a great deal to her. Her family was especially important to her. She was blessed with 13 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. Her dog Belle was a cherished and faithful companion. Pauline is survived by her children and their spouses: Connie Canali of Greeley, Colo., Rick and Connie Greene of Littleton, Colo., Paula and Tom Gore of Ault, Colo., and Michael and Julieanne Greene of Bend, Ore.; her stepsons and spouses: Larry and Kathy Jenni of Elizabeth, Colo., Alan and Pat Jenni of Denver, and Terry Jenni of Littleton, Colo.; 13 grandchildren: Meghan, Gia, Reva, Jimmy, Jason, Jeremy, Katie, Ian, Taylor, Hunter, Laura, Kate, Ryan, and their spouses. The great-grandchildren were special blessings to Pauline: Allie Jo, Jonathan, and Aiden. She is also survived by her brothers Alton and Norman and wife Elaine, along with numerous nieces and nephews. Services were held Jan. 17 in Littleton. Memorial contributions may be sent to the American Heart Association, 1280 S. Parker Road, Denver, Colo., 80231.

Youth join in 4-H’s National Conversation

Morgan County CSU Cooperative Extension Twelve Colorado youth and adults were among 1,200 youth and adults from throughout the country who participated in the National Conversation on Youth Development in the 21st Century held recently in Washington, D.C. This national summit was sponsored by 4-H to create a youth-led action plan to improve urban, suburban and rural communities nationwide. The National Conversation’s findings, tabulated using instant polling technology, will be presented to President Bush, members of Congress and other political and community leaders in April. Speaking at the National Conversation, U.S.A. Freedom Corps Director John Bridgeland said the purpose of President Bush’s new volunteer initiative “is to ask every American to stop, to pause, to ask the question, ‘What will be my great service to my neighbor, my community, my country and the world?’ “ Bridgeland hailed the youth participating in the National Conversation, as well as the millions of 4-H members throughout the country saying, “You are the rising generation, and I know with your commitment to public service, you can in fact become the next greatest generation.” Also speaking at the 4-H summit was Harris Wofford, chairman of America’s Promise, who described the youth in attendance as “the promise in America.” Further, he underscored the importance of their role in U.S.A. Freedom Corps: “You are vital parts of those armies of compassion that President Bush has called into action.” 4-H youth presented Bridgeland and Wofford with a large check representing more than 1.3 million hours committed thus far by 100,000 youth and adults to the “Power of YOUth Pledge” Campaign, a volunteerism drive aimed at improving communities nationwide. The individual commitments were made to address a variety of community needs including: – Helping a younger person (17 ,641 pledges totaling 282,221 hours); – Improving my community (14,096 pledges totaling 187,748 hours); – Helping an older person (16,723 pledges totaling 178,826 hours); – Mentoring and tutoring (8,496 pledges totaling 137,905 hours); – Building respect and tolerance (10,165 pledges totaling 136,954 hours); – Improving the environment (12, 110 pledges totaling 119,333 hours). Bridgeland described the “Power of YOUth Pledge” Campaign as “an engine of humanity that can change our country and the world” and “a great gift to America.” 4-H is sponsoring both the National Conversation on Youth Development in the 21st Century and the “Power of YOUth Pledge” Campaign to mark its 100th anniversary. “Rather than erect a monument to ourselves, we decided to make a gift to America by identifying the needs of our communities nationwide and to develop a youth-led action plan that addresses these needs,” said Donald T. Floyd Jr., president and CEO of National 4-H Council. “The Conversations will identify how to make America better and the Power of Youth Pledge Campaign will provide some of the resources to get the job done.” “The generous support of our public and private partners is a strong indication that America has heard President Bush’s call to service loudly and clearly,” said Floyd. For more about the National Conversation on Youth Development in the 21st Century visit http://www.4hcentennial.org.