Longhorns at Latigo attract attention | TheFencePost.com

Longhorns at Latigo attract attention

While there’s a growing market for “Longhorn Lean Beef,” there’s still a lot of interest in the unique genetic traits and appearance of this oldest of American cattle breeds. Attesting to that fact was the interest shown in the Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association’s 16th Annual Registered Texas Longhorn competition held last month at Latigo arena in Black Forest, Colo. The Grand Champion steer, Silverado Shadow, was a 6-year-old sporting horns that span well over 7-feet tip-to-tip! His pretty speckled hide and gentle disposition typify the “personality” that attracts a lot of part time ranchers to the historic breed. However, reproduction and adaptability remain the mainstay of the breed and the sale of breeding stock is the focus of most owners. Cows and bulls are judged for their reproductive functionality, and a fat calf at side weighs strongly with the judges. The top cow, selected as Grand Champion All-Age Female was a 9-year-old owned by Searle Ranch of Monument and Ellicott. The same ranch, which is managed by Gary Lake, exhibited the top steer. Reserve Champion All-Age Female was Shadow Dancer, a 4-year-old owned and shown by Randy and Marsha Witte of Peyton. Grand Champion Bull honors went to Batman, bred and shown by the Wittes. Reserve Champion Bull, CB Zapata el Grande, was shown by John and Darlene Nelson of Cloverbloom Ranch in Wellington, Colo. Stan Jernigan of Cross Plains, Texas judged the Open Show, while Paige Evans of Kiowa, Colo., judged both heifer futurity classes and the Trailblazer (New Breeders) Division. Winners of the futurity were Stan and Lorna Searle in the yearling class and Clyde and Virginia Peek took First place in the 2-year-old class. Peeks also took top honors in the Trail Blazer Division. The Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association, which is affiliated with the International Texas Longhorn Association, has members in Wyoming, Nebraska, Utah, Colorado and Arizona. For information on the Texas Longhorn breed or either association, please contact Darlene Nelson by email at clovrblm@ezlink.com. While there’s a growing market for “Longhorn Lean Beef,” there’s still a lot of interest in the unique genetic traits and appearance of this oldest of American cattle breeds. Attesting to that fact was the interest shown in the Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association’s 16th Annual Registered Texas Longhorn competition held last month at Latigo arena in Black Forest, Colo. The Grand Champion steer, Silverado Shadow, was a 6-year-old sporting horns that span well over 7-feet tip-to-tip! His pretty speckled hide and gentle disposition typify the “personality” that attracts a lot of part time ranchers to the historic breed. However, reproduction and adaptability remain the mainstay of the breed and the sale of breeding stock is the focus of most owners. Cows and bulls are judged for their reproductive functionality, and a fat calf at side weighs strongly with the judges. The top cow, selected as Grand Champion All-Age Female was a 9-year-old owned by Searle Ranch of Monument and Ellicott. The same ranch, which is managed by Gary Lake, exhibited the top steer. Reserve Champion All-Age Female was Shadow Dancer, a 4-year-old owned and shown by Randy and Marsha Witte of Peyton. Grand Champion Bull honors went to Batman, bred and shown by the Wittes. Reserve Champion Bull, CB Zapata el Grande, was shown by John and Darlene Nelson of Cloverbloom Ranch in Wellington, Colo. Stan Jernigan of Cross Plains, Texas judged the Open Show, while Paige Evans of Kiowa, Colo., judged both heifer futurity classes and the Trailblazer (New Breeders) Division. Winners of the futurity were Stan and Lorna Searle in the yearling class and Clyde and Virginia Peek took First place in the 2-year-old class. Peeks also took top honors in the Trail Blazer Division. The Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association, which is affiliated with the International Texas Longhorn Association, has members in Wyoming, Nebraska, Utah, Colorado and Arizona. For information on the Texas Longhorn breed or either association, please contact Darlene Nelson by email at clovrblm@ezlink.com. While there’s a growing market for “Longhorn Lean Beef,” there’s still a lot of interest in the unique genetic traits and appearance of this oldest of American cattle breeds. Attesting to that fact was the interest shown in the Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association’s 16th Annual Registered Texas Longhorn competition held last month at Latigo arena in Black Forest, Colo. The Grand Champion steer, Silverado Shadow, was a 6-year-old sporting horns that span well over 7-feet tip-to-tip! His pretty speckled hide and gentle disposition typify the “personality” that attracts a lot of part time ranchers to the historic breed. However, reproduction and adaptability remain the mainstay of the breed and the sale of breeding stock is the focus of most owners. Cows and bulls are judged for their reproductive functionality, and a fat calf at side weighs strongly with the judges. The top cow, selected as Grand Champion All-Age Female was a 9-year-old owned by Searle Ranch of Monument and Ellicott. The same ranch, which is managed by Gary Lake, exhibited the top steer. Reserve Champion All-Age Female was Shadow Dancer, a 4-year-old owned and shown by Randy and Marsha Witte of Peyton. Grand Champion Bull honors went to Batman, bred and shown by the Wittes. Reserve Champion Bull, CB Zapata el Grande, was shown by John and Darlene Nelson of Cloverbloom Ranch in Wellington, Colo. Stan Jernigan of Cross Plains, Texas judged the Open Show, while Paige Evans of Kiowa, Colo., judged both heifer futurity classes and the Trailblazer (New Breeders) Division. Winners of the futurity were Stan and Lorna Searle in the yearling class and Clyde and Virginia Peek took First place in the 2-year-old class. Peeks also took top honors in the Trail Blazer Division. The Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association, which is affiliated with the International Texas Longhorn Association, has members in Wyoming, Nebraska, Utah, Colorado and Arizona. For information on the Texas Longhorn breed or either association, please contact Darlene Nelson by email at clovrblm@ezlink.com. While there’s a growing market for “Longhorn Lean Beef,” there’s still a lot of interest in the unique genetic traits and appearance of this oldest of American cattle breeds. Attesting to that fact was the interest shown in the Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association’s 16th Annual Registered Texas Longhorn competition held last month at Latigo arena in Black Forest, Colo. The Grand Champion steer, Silverado Shadow, was a 6-year-old sporting horns that span well over 7-feet tip-to-tip! His pretty speckled hide and gentle disposition typify the “personality” that attracts a lot of part time ranchers to the historic breed. However, reproduction and adaptability remain the mainstay of the breed and the sale of breeding stock is the focus of most owners. Cows and bulls are judged for their reproductive functionality, and a fat calf at side weighs strongly with the judges. The top cow, selected as Grand Champion All-Age Female was a 9-year-old owned by Searle Ranch of Monument and Ellicott. The same ranch, which is managed by Gary Lake, exhibited the top steer. Reserve Champion All-Age Female was Shadow Dancer, a 4-year-old owned and shown by Randy and Marsha Witte of Peyton. Grand Champion Bull honors went to Batman, bred and shown by the Wittes. Reserve Champion Bull, CB Zapata el Grande, was shown by John and Darlene Nelson of Cloverbloom Ranch in Wellington, Colo. Stan Jernigan of Cross Plains, Texas judged the Open Show, while Paige Evans of Kiowa, Colo., judged both heifer futurity classes and the Trailblazer (New Breeders) Division. Winners of the futurity were Stan and Lorna Searle in the yearling class and Clyde and Virginia Peek took First place in the 2-year-old class. Peeks also took top honors in the Trail Blazer Division. The Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association, which is affiliated with the International Texas Longhorn Association, has members in Wyoming, Nebraska, Utah, Colorado and Arizona. For information on the Texas Longhorn breed or either association, please contact Darlene Nelson by email at clovrblm@ezlink.com.

Searle Ranch Texas Longhorns – A Colorado Success Story

Like most iconic symbols of the American West, the Texas Longhorn almost ceased to exist in the early 1900s. The Longhorn began its life as escaped cattle from Spanish explorers in the 1500s. By the 1800s the Spanish criollo stock were mixing with the English cattle belonging to early settlers. The result was a lean, long legged animal with long horns and a variety of colors. By the beginning of the Civil War, the half-wild Texas longhorns had emerged as a recognizable type. After the Civil War the west was overrun with cattle and no local markets for them. There was a ready labor force in decommissioned soldiers and railroads hundreds of miles away that lead to beef markets in the North. The solution as to how to get to the rail heads was solved by men like Goodnight, Loving, and Chisom and the brief era of the cattle drive began. During the roughly three decades of the cattle drives, over 10 million cattle were moved. The cattle drives stamped the character of the west, became the economic base of the region, made the Longhorn historic, and glorified the cowboy as an American tradition. The decline of the Texas Longhorn was caused by many factors, mostly relating to the rapidly changing face of the new nation. To preserve the purity of the Texas Longhorn breed, the U.S. Forest Service set up the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge herd in Oklahoma. Through generations of culling, blood typing, and exhaustive documentation, the Wichita Refuge has re-established and maintained a pure Texas Longhorn herd. After it's near extinction, the Longhorn never really re-asserted itself as a commercial meat animal. America's taste had changed and now wanted red meat with a higher fat content and the constantly growing population needed cattle that matured faster than the Longhorn did. But the popularity of the Longhorn continued to be strong. Now that their bloodlines were traceable, Longhorns could be bred with genetically predictable results and a profitable show ring circuit developed. Not all the successful Longhorn ranches are in Texas. Colorado also has its place in the history of the Texas Longhorn. We have a very successful Longhorn ranch in Colorado. The Searle Ranch is owned by Stan Searle, managed by Gary Lake, and located in Ellicott, which is 16 miles due east of Colorado Springs. "We are sitting on a spot where about eight miles west of here, Charlie Goodnight and Oliver Loving brought thousands of head of Longhorn cattle out of the Panhandle of Texas on the Goodnight-Loving Trail right through here, going to the Denver Stockyards and on to Cheyenne for the railways," said Gary Lake. Owner, Stan Searle and Manager, Gary Lake have spent over 30 years designing a genetic plan that has resulted in unsurpassed color, horn growth, meat quality and disposition in the Searle Ranch herd. Their slogan, "Predictable Genetics … The Foundation for Success!," is the cornerstone of their achievement. Genetics starts with herd sires and Searle Ranch has two of the best in Winchester and Top Caliber. Winchester is by Gizmo, a son of the one and only, Zhivago, and out of Sadie Sam. With a tip to tip horn width of 72-inches and weighing well over a ton, this is one of the premier herd sires in the Longhorn breed today. Top Caliber is a five year old bull that is in a class by himself. Top Caliber is jointly owned by a six member closed partnership and was purchased for $225,000. Top Caliber was born in Wheatland, Wyoming, on the Magill Ranch. His sire was Hunts Command Respect, which is currently the leading sire of bulls with a horn length over 70 inches. His dam, Hashbrown, has a pedigree that is packed with big horned ancestry. Top Caliber is a two-time World Champion, and at 86 inches, has the longest horn measurement in history. You may have already seen some of the Searle Ranch Longhorns and not realized it. Everyone knows a Longhorn when they see one and because of the gentle disposition of the breed, it has become a favorite element of parades. The Searle Ranch Longhorns have been driven down 17th Street in Denver to kick off the National Western Stock Show, and through downtown Colorado Springs as part of the Ride for the Brand Ranch Rodeo celebration. "The animals that we use for parades are not specially trained. All of our cattle are gentle. If we get one that is not, they don't stay long. We just use whatever we catch up that day," said Searle Ranch manager, Gary Lake. Two years ago, the Searle ranch decided to explore the growing consumer demand for leaner beef. Rather than sell their culls at the sale barn, the ranch "began to package and sell some USDA stamped beef and we could not find enough animals to butcher that year," said Gary Lake. "It quickly became more of a business than we expected. We are up to 30 or 40 head this year. Now we are looking at ways to make it a little more efficient." "We sell only ranch raised, grass finished, certified, pure Texas Longhorn beef that has been raised free of antibiotic feeding, hormones, steroids or growth implants," said Gary Lake. "We can advertise, with data, that grass fed Texas Longhorn Beef is lower in cholesterol than white meat chicken. Even with all of its success in other areas, the Searle ranch is still in the business of selling cattle. "The only true American cattle breed is the Texas Longhorn, everything else is pretty much an import. Texas Longhorns were the mainstay of the cattle industry for hundreds of years. The nostalgia, the beautiful color, the massive horns and the gentle disposition make them a natural for someone wanting to get into the business," said Gary Lake. "They don't have calving problems. They don't have predator problems. Cows have better browse utilization and they have less disease. You never see a Longhorn with pinkeye. These are things that are just not present in the Longhorn breed." "Longhorns are maintenance free cattle. Anyone can own one. They are popular because of their history and massive horns, and nothing creates more magic in the pasture than a majestic Longhorn cow or steer," said Gary Lake. ❖

Rocky Mountain Auction Update

Auction Update June 11 J. Brogan and Sons Ranch Co. Ranch Equipment Auction, Antioch, Neb. 308-239-4669. Welding Manufacturing Equipment Auction, Sterling, Colo. 970-522-1950. June 12 Spencer Vehicles and Equipment Auction, Potter, Neb. 308-262-1150. June 13 Charles Bunker and James Kettering Estates Auction, Poncha Springs, Colo. 719-539-8940, 719-539-4216. Surplus Equipment Auction, Denver, Colo. 303-289-1600. Land and Water Auction, Wray, Colo. 800-476-7185, 970-332-3350. June 14 Flatwork Cementers Auction, Sidney, Neb. 308-262-1150. June 15 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. Large Consignment Auction, Wellington, Colo. 970-568-9828, 800-818-9005. Open Consignment Horse Auction, Loveland, Colo. 970-493-3036. See page 21. June 16 Select Catalog Horse Sale, Loveland, Colo. 970-493-3036. See page 21. Estate Auction for the Late Eddie Dion, Loveland, Colo. 970-667-5590. See page 95. Estate and Antique Auction, Georgetown, Colo. 970-260-5577. See page 116. Messing Estate Auction, Lodgepole, Neb. 308-262-1150. Equipment, Antique and Collectible Auction, Limon, Colo. 719-775-0707, 719-740-2537. Robinson Estate Auction, Westminster, Colo. 303-822-9298. See page 98. Yapp Estate Auction, Sterling, Colo. 970-474-3693. See page 92. C&L Irrigation, Inc. Complete Liquidation Auction, Flora Vista, N.M. 505-320-2835, 505-793-3334. See page 97. Bechthold Estate Real Estate and Household Auction Windsor, Colo. 970-353-2061. See page 94. Hay and Farm Equipment Auction, Cheyenne, Wyo. 307-547-3492. Tack & Misc. Auction, Castle Rock, Colo. 303-688-5223, 303-841-1454. See page 95. Public Auction, Brush, Colo. 970-380-7653, 970-847-3466, 970-867-7053. See page 116. Home Improvement Auction, Colorado Springs, Colo. 719-635-7331. See page 108. Building Material & Hardware Liquidation Auction, Longmont Colo. 970-381-3975. See page 117. Ashcraft Auction, Limon, Colo. 719-775-0707. See page 110. Wild West Auction, Loveland, Colo. 303-570-9763. See page 104. June 16 Southwest and Indian Art Aucttion, Longmont, Colo. 505-632-3735, 303-776-6490. See page 99. Building Supply Auction, Denver, Colo. 970-454-1010. See page 105. June 17 Annual Western Auction, Loveland, Colo. 970-663-7551. See page 103. June 18 Absolute Real Estate Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-396-3701 Absolute Land Auction, Pueblo, Colo. 303-289-1600. See page 93. June 19 Two Gas and Convenience Stores Public Auction, Ogallala, Neb. 308-530-0221, 308-534-9240. June 20 Zion Machinery Auction, Wray, Colo. 970-332-3350. June 21 Marshal Farm Equipment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 303-601-0588. June 22 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. Zion Land Auction, Wray, Colo. 970-332-3350. Large Consignment Auction, Wellington, Colo. 970-568-9828, 800-818-9005. June 22 and 23 McClelland Lifetime Collection of Antiques and Collectibles Two-Day Estate Auction, Beaver City, Neb. 308-962-7745. June 23 Moraua Estate Auction, Antiques/Collectibles, Household, Tools, Trailers, Tractors, Vehicles, Marsland, Neb. 308-665-1493. See page 94 Marlene Brown Tractor, Antiques and Collectibles and Personal Property Auction, Ogallala, Neb. 308-352-7777. Hay Auction, Ft. Collins, Colo. 970-482-6207. Melia Real Estate, Antiques, Collectibles and Household Auction, Arriba, Colo. 719-765-4446. Wolever Real Estate Auction, Snyder, Colo. 970-842-5575. See page 96 Specialty Auto Auction, Loveland, Colo. 800-901-0022. See page 94. June 24 Reutzel Brothers Antique Auction, Antiques and Collectibles, Household, Arrowheads, Glassware, Tools, Antique toys, Orid, Colo. 970-474-3693. See page 98 June 25 CB Land Co. Riverbottom Auction, Ft. Morgan, Colo. 970-522-7770. See page 133. June 26 Historic McMurtrey Ranch Auction, Valentine, Neb. 308-534-9240. June 27 June Consignment Auction, Brush, Colo. 970-842-5575. William Stretesky CRP Land Auction, Chappell, Neb. 970-522-7770. See page 132. June 28 Eldon Peterson Estate Ranch Equipment Auction, Arthur, Neb. 308-239-4669. June 29 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. June 29 and 30 Ott Two- Day Auction, Aurora, Neb. 402-694-3368, 402-631-9085. June 30 Jim Lafoe Moving Auction, Commerce City, Colo. 303-822-9298, 303-324-4385. June 30 Grenwalt Family Antiques and Collectibles Auction, Limon, Colo. 719-765-4446. June Consignment Auction, Brush, Colo. 970-842-5575. July 6 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. July 7 Sperber Estate Auction, Sterling, Colo. 970-474-3693. George Balcerovich Estate Auction, Kiowa, Colo. 303-841-1454. July 9 Peterson Land Auction, Briggsdale, Colo. 970-353-2061. See page 45. July 12 Absolute Ranch Auction, Moffat County, Colo. 800-556-5454. See page 90. July 13 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. July 13 and 14 Colorado Driving Horse, Mule and Carriage Auction, Brighton, Colo. 970-785-6282. See page 20. July 15 Antique Auction, Loveland, Colo. 970-663-7551. July 16 5620 Acres Land Auction, Ashland, Kan. 800-451-2709. See page 93. July 20 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. July 27 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. July 28 Hay Auction, Ft. Collins, Colo. 970-482-6207. August 3 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. August 10 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. August 17 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. August 24 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. August 25 Coghill Estate Auction, North Platte, Neb. 970-474-3693. August 31 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. September 7 Friday Consignment Auction, Greeley, Colo. 970-356-2998. v Livestock Update June 9 Mid-America Miniature and Pony Consignment Sale, Abilene, Kan. 785-483-3809. Sell-Abration Horse Sale, Steamboat Springs, Colo. 970-870-8200. Mule Days Select Saddle Mule Auction, Eagle, Colo. 800-359-5608. June 15 Open Consignment Horse Sale, Loveland, Colo. 970-493-3036. June 16 Select Catalog Horse Sale, Loveland, Colo. 970-493-3036. June 23 Dave Bashor Horse Sale, Grover, Colo. 970-895-2368. See page 56. August 11 Thoroughbred Yearling Sale, Aurora, Colo. 303-294-0260. v

Cattlemen’s Classic in Kearney sets new record in sales

The Nebraska Cattlemen’s Classic, held Feb. 20-26, set a new record this year bringing in nearly $1.6 million in sales over the course of the week. A total of 473 lots were sold, and over 1,500 new buyers registered at the event. The competition kicked off on Tuesday, Feb. 21, with the Working Horse Competition. Thirty-two horses competed in the event, and the Supreme Ranch Horse was Lot 3, San Hollys Smart Gin sired by San Hollys Tangy Gin, consigned by Justin Finley/Walker Horse Training, Gem, Kan., and sold to Steve VanPelt., of Archer, Neb., for $6,250. The top High-Selling Ranch Horse was Cody Bar Hancock “Roanie” sired by Doc Quixote Hancock, consigned by Triple T Quarter Circle Ranch of Otis, Kan. The horse was sold to Blake Macy, of Lebanon, Neb., for $7,250. The sale grossed $103,400 and the average for the sale was $3,231. The Working Dog Show was also held that day, were four dogs competed. The Supreme Working Dog was Tyke, sired by Rooster, consigned by Rudy Starke, Alliance, Neb., and sold to Andy Albrecht of Thurston, Neb., for $1,900. The high selling dog was 4th place dog, Fats, consigned by Rudy Starke of Alliance, Neb., and sold to William Stone of North Platte, Neb., for $2,100. The sale grossed $6,500, with an average $1,625. On Wednesday, Feb. 22, the horned Hereford’s, polled Hereford’s and Red Angus competed. The Grand Champion Horned Hereford Bull and high-seller was WCC/CC 1009 Great Divide 102, consigned by White Cattle Company of Buffalo, Wyo. This bull was sold to Buddy Leachman, Big Gully Farm of Maidstone, Saskatchewan, Canada, for $15,000. He was also the Supreme Bull. The Grand Champion Horned Hereford Heifer and high-selling female was JC Miss Advance 029, consigned by White Cattle Co. of Buffalo, Wyo. This heifer sold to Tom and Rhonda Kupke of Kearney, Neb. for $12,000. The horned Hereford sale featured 13 bulls, averaging $4,577. There were also 11 heifers that sold, averaging $3,650. The horned Herefords brought in $99,650 total. The Champion Polled Hereford Bull and high-seller was VCR 4037 Duramax 26 ET – ET, consigned by Valley Creek Ranch of Fairbury, Neb. This bull was sold to Beran Farms of Odell, Neb., for $5,500. The Champion Polled Hereford Heifer and high seller was KJ BJ 544T Mistress 467Y ET – ET consigned by Jensen Bros. of Courtland, Kan. She sold to Saige Ward of Laramie, Wyo., for $6,500. The sale featured 26 bulls averaging $3,687, and 13 heifers averaging $3,050. The sale grossed $135,500 and averaged $3,474. The Champion Red Angus Bull and high-seller was J6RA Red Capacity 1620 consigned by J-6 Farms of Gibbon, Neb. This bull sold to Mike Anderson of Gothenburg, Neb., for $6,750. Champion Red Angus Heifer and high-seller was AHL Eleanor 126Y consigned by LeDoux Ranch of Agenda, Kan. This heifer sold to Douglas Heavican of Rogers, Neb., for $6,200. The sale featured 12 bulls averaging $4,008, six heifers averaging $4,033, and the overall total was $72,300. On Feb. 23, the Angus, Simmental and Charolais breeders competed. The Champion Angus Bull was Lot 37, SB Darkside 127, consigned by Sisco Brothers Cattle Company of Syracuse, Neb. This bull was sold to Damion Dix of Stockton, Neb. for $8,000. The Champion Angus Heifer and high-seller was JJT Barbara 101, consigned by Tracy Cattle of Wellfleet, Neb. She sold to Breinig Ranch/Gary Gottsch of Arapahoe, Neb., for $7,000. The Angus sale featured 36 bulls averaging $4,354 and 14 heifers averaging $3,461. The sale grossed $205,200. The Champion Simmental Bull and high-seller was Lambert Harley 106Y, consigned by Lambert Family of Chadron, Neb. The bull was sold to WY Cattle Service, Inc. of Yoder, Wyo., for $10,500. The Champion Simmental Heifer, record-setter and high-seller was ZKCC Cow 550X, consigned by Kraenow Cattle Co. of Hemingford, Neb. She sold to Felt/Willers/Forster Partnership of Wakefield/Stanton/Smithfield, Neb., for $21,000. This heifer was also the Supreme Heifer. The sale featured 28 bulls averaging $4,239 and 16 heifers averaging $4,659. The sale brought in $193,250. The Champion Charolais Bull was HCF Uncle Jesse, consigned by Hassebrook Charolais Farm of Genoa, Neb. He was sold to Dave Hebbert, Hebbert Charolais of Hyannis, Neb. for $6,000. Champion Charolais Heifer was Kanza J6 Mercedes Sequel Y9 – ET, consigned by Kanza Cattle of Chapman, Kan. She sold to Rob Fischer of Rensselaer, Ind., for $5,500. The 2012 sale featured 23 bulls averaging $3,946 and six heifers averaging $5,225. The sale grossed $122,100. On Feb. 24, the Limousin, Balancer/Gelbvieh and Shorthorn breeders competed. The Champion Limousin Bull and high seller was BRAW Upper Echelon 169, consigned by Bullis Creek Ranch of Wood Lake, Neb. He sold to Max Schultz of Oxford, Neb., for $6,200. Champion Limousin Heifer and high seller was BRAW Ms Spaceship 121, consigned by Bullis Creek Ranch of Wood Lake, Neb. This heifer sold to Halle, Emma and Katie Ramsey of Fullerton, Neb., for $3,950. The sale has seven bulls that averaged $4,557 and one heifer that sold for $3,950. The sale grossed $35,850. The Grand Champion Balancer/Gelbvieh Bull and high seller was Insidious 612Y, consigned by J.J. Boehler of Orleans, Neb. He was sold to Cedar Top Ranch of Stapleton, Neb., for $5,500. Grand Champion Balancer/Gelbvieh Heifer was BARG Rose 113Y, consigned by Barwick Gelbvieh of Orleans, Neb. She was sold to Elizabeth Krajewski of Venango, Neb., for $5,000. The sale featured 12 bulls that averaged $3,425, and 10 heifers that averaged $2,365. The sale brought in a total of $64,750. The Grand Champion Shorthorn Bull and co-high-seller was HILLS Primo’s Pride 107 ET, consigned by Indian Hills Land & Cattle of Garland, Neb. He was sold to Schroeder Family Shorthorns of Columbus, Neb., for $4,000. The Champion Shorthorn Heifer was WR Amp Suzy 159, consigned by Warner Ranch Shorthorns, LLC, of Riverton, Wyo. This heifer sold to Jay Cech, of Clarkson, Neb., for $3,500. The sale featured nine bulls that averaged $2,600, and 11 heifers averaged $2,514. The sale grossed $51,050. The final show day, Feb. 25, featured Maine Anjou/Maintainer and Chianina breeders. Champion Maine Anjou/MaineTainer Bull was ATV Ali’s Champ, consigned by ATV Show Team of Amherst, Colo. He was sold to Todd Ibach/Greg Ibach/Floyd Waller of Sumner, Neb., for $12,500 and was the high seller. The Grand Champion Maine Anjou Heifer and high-seller was SBCC Little Sweetie, consigned by Rick Schultz Show Cattle of Cairo, Neb. She was sold to Jason Schneider of Cozad, Neb., for $4,400. The sale featured 21 bulls that averaged $4,002, and five heifers that averaged $2,660. The sale grossed $97,350. The Grand Champion Chianina Bull and high-seller was Power Stroke, consigned by Greg Christo of Albion, Neb. He was sold to Kurt Kleinschmidt of Sutton, Neb., for $24,000. The Grand Champion Chianina Heifer was FR Super Lady 0350, consigned by Fred Ranch of Rose, Neb. This heifer was sold to Tyson Vogt of Elmwood, Neb., for $3,500. The Chianina sale featured six bulls that averaged $7,567, and seven heifers that averaged $4,743. The sale brought in $78,600. In addition to the shows and sales, the Classic also featured a junior market show on Feb. 26. “My favorite event is the youth events. The rewards for providing them lots of opportunities is priceless,” said Ronnette Heinrich, show coordinator. The champion market animal was shown by Beau Bremer of St. Edward, Neb., with his 932 pound crossbred steer. The reserve champion was shown by Samantha Schneider of Cozad, Neb., with her 902 pound crossbred steer.

Rocky Mountain Fence Post Obituaries for 12-29: J. Lee Sears; Thomas Elmer Barker; Melva Jean Rains; Kenneth Ray Kissler; William Hayes Elrick Sr; Wilber L. "Will" Quick

J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com.

Rocky Mountain Fence Post Obituaries for 12-29: J. Lee Sears; Thomas Elmer Barker; Melva Jean Rains; Kenneth Ray Kissler; William Hayes Elrick Sr; Wilber L. "Will" Quick

J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com. J.Lee Sears, age 79, of Greeley, Colo., died Dec. 14, 2008, the result of a heart attack. He was born in Brighton, Colo., on June 3, 1929, to Oliver and Pearl Sears. He attended school in Brighton and Fort Lupton, Colo., and graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1947. In 1946, he was stricken with polio, where he lost the use of both arms. Despite his physical challenges, he furthered his education at Reisch Auction School in Mason City, Iowa, and later obtained his Real Estate Certificate from the University of Colorado. He lived in Brighton until 1941, when his family moved to the farm east of Fort Lupton. J. Lee married LaVeda Smith in Fort Lupton in 1954. They moved into Fort Lupton, where they raised their three children, Mark, Kay and Jay. In 1960, J. Lee was provided with great mobility when he acquired a car equipped with special controls that allowed him to drive with his feet. This was just one of many adaptations he used to overcome his paralysis and succeed in life. In 1949, J. Lee joined Ehrlich Sales Service in Brighton as an Auctioneer, and continued as Partner until his retirement in 1991. In 1951, he joined Whiteside Realty in Fort Lupton, acquiring the firm in 1961, and then doing business as JL Sears and Associates until his retirement in 1992. He was a member of the Colorado and National Association of Auctioneers and the Colorado and National Association of Realtors. After retirement, he and LaVeda moved to Greeley, after enjoying a few years in Estes Park. J. Lee was an avid Fort Lupton Blue Devils sports fan. He was recognized as a community leader and was proud to be a member of the Fort Lupton Lions Club and the First Baptist Chruch of Fort Lupton. He served in many volunteer roles throughout his lifetime. Since moving to Greeley, he served on the Easter Seals/CSU Extension Agri-bility Board of Directors and the RSVP Project Connect. J. Lee and LaVeda traveled extensively throughout their lives, seeing all 50 states and many countries. They enjoyed taking their children and their families on many cruises, camping and car trips. J. Lee is survived by his wife, LaVeda; his son Mark and wife Jayne of Fort Collins; daughter Kay and husband Mike Collins of Brighton, Colo., and Jay and wife Debbie of Houston, Texas: six grandchildren: Jeff Collins, Alison Wright-Sears, Bethany Hinton-Collins, Jonathan Sears, Oliver Sears, and Meredith McLeod Sears; and one great-grandchild: Cameron Collins. Graveside services were held in Brighton on December 19 at Elmwood Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be sent to the Greeley First Church of the Nazarene, designated for the Peru mission. Friends may view the online obituary at http://www.taborfuneralhome.com.

Rocky Mountain Obituaries 8-22-11

Claxton Wade Duvall, 89, passed away May 29, 2011 in Cheyenne Wells, Colo. He was born on June 8, 1921 in Beaver County, Okla. He was the third of 11 children to Belmer Duvall and Fronia Wade Duvall. “Clax,” as he became affectionately known as, attended the Greenoudh High School, graduating in 1939. On January 1, 1945, Clax was united in marriage to Daisy Wall. Clax and Daisy moved to Wild Horse, Colo., in 1948 where they suitcase farmed until 1952. Clax and Daisy decided to make Colorado their home and raise their family and continue to farm and ranch north of Wild Horse, Colo. Clax loved the sport of rodeo. He particularly loved to bulldog and calf rope. In 1955 he earned the Colorado Champion Bulldogger award. Clax served as a Cheyenne County commissioner in the 1980s. Clax loved his life, his family and his many friends. He was a devoted member of the Kit Carson United Methodist Church. Clax was most happy when he was working with his cattle and horses. Clax was a true cowboy and he truly valued his livestock. He richly enjoyed helping Gene and Barbara work cattle, as both were a huge part of his life. Clax lived a life of integrity and determination and will be greatly missed. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Daisy; two children Carol (Bill) Rogers of Wiggins, Colo., and Gene Duvall of Seibert, Colo.; six grandchildren Frank Rogers of Taylors, S.C., Shari Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Larry Matschke and Earl Matschke both of Seibert, Colo., Jessie Matschke of Loveland, Colo., and Anna Matschke of Ft. Collins, Colo.; eight great-grandchildren Natalie, Blake and Adam Rogers of South Carolina, Bryce, Drew and Kyle Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Tori Thorson and Austin Matschke of Seibert, Colo.; two brother Kip Duvall of Florida and Marion Duvall of Texas; three sisters; Neva Jane Amen of Kansas, Pearl Akers of Louisiana and Georgia Cantrell of Texas; and many nieces, nephews and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, his daughter-in-law Barbara Duvall whom Clax was especially close to because she was always available and ready to help Clax and Daisy, one brother Joe Clancy Duvall, four sisters, Mary Arnold, Polly Chase, Lilly Dodd and Morina Price and one great-grandson, Devan Matschke. Memorial services were held June 3, 2011 at the United Methodist Church in Kit Carson, Colo. Interment was at Kit Carson Cemetery. Friends and family can register online condolences and sign the guest book at BrownFuneralDirectors.com. Claxton Wade Duvall, 89, passed away May 29, 2011 in Cheyenne Wells, Colo. He was born on June 8, 1921 in Beaver County, Okla. He was the third of 11 children to Belmer Duvall and Fronia Wade Duvall. “Clax,” as he became affectionately known as, attended the Greenoudh High School, graduating in 1939. On January 1, 1945, Clax was united in marriage to Daisy Wall. Clax and Daisy moved to Wild Horse, Colo., in 1948 where they suitcase farmed until 1952. Clax and Daisy decided to make Colorado their home and raise their family and continue to farm and ranch north of Wild Horse, Colo. Clax loved the sport of rodeo. He particularly loved to bulldog and calf rope. In 1955 he earned the Colorado Champion Bulldogger award. Clax served as a Cheyenne County commissioner in the 1980s. Clax loved his life, his family and his many friends. He was a devoted member of the Kit Carson United Methodist Church. Clax was most happy when he was working with his cattle and horses. Clax was a true cowboy and he truly valued his livestock. He richly enjoyed helping Gene and Barbara work cattle, as both were a huge part of his life. Clax lived a life of integrity and determination and will be greatly missed. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Daisy; two children Carol (Bill) Rogers of Wiggins, Colo., and Gene Duvall of Seibert, Colo.; six grandchildren Frank Rogers of Taylors, S.C., Shari Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Larry Matschke and Earl Matschke both of Seibert, Colo., Jessie Matschke of Loveland, Colo., and Anna Matschke of Ft. Collins, Colo.; eight great-grandchildren Natalie, Blake and Adam Rogers of South Carolina, Bryce, Drew and Kyle Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Tori Thorson and Austin Matschke of Seibert, Colo.; two brother Kip Duvall of Florida and Marion Duvall of Texas; three sisters; Neva Jane Amen of Kansas, Pearl Akers of Louisiana and Georgia Cantrell of Texas; and many nieces, nephews and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, his daughter-in-law Barbara Duvall whom Clax was especially close to because she was always available and ready to help Clax and Daisy, one brother Joe Clancy Duvall, four sisters, Mary Arnold, Polly Chase, Lilly Dodd and Morina Price and one great-grandson, Devan Matschke. Memorial services were held June 3, 2011 at the United Methodist Church in Kit Carson, Colo. Interment was at Kit Carson Cemetery. Friends and family can register online condolences and sign the guest book at BrownFuneralDirectors.com. Claxton Wade Duvall, 89, passed away May 29, 2011 in Cheyenne Wells, Colo. He was born on June 8, 1921 in Beaver County, Okla. He was the third of 11 children to Belmer Duvall and Fronia Wade Duvall. “Clax,” as he became affectionately known as, attended the Greenoudh High School, graduating in 1939. On January 1, 1945, Clax was united in marriage to Daisy Wall. Clax and Daisy moved to Wild Horse, Colo., in 1948 where they suitcase farmed until 1952. Clax and Daisy decided to make Colorado their home and raise their family and continue to farm and ranch north of Wild Horse, Colo. Clax loved the sport of rodeo. He particularly loved to bulldog and calf rope. In 1955 he earned the Colorado Champion Bulldogger award. Clax served as a Cheyenne County commissioner in the 1980s. Clax loved his life, his family and his many friends. He was a devoted member of the Kit Carson United Methodist Church. Clax was most happy when he was working with his cattle and horses. Clax was a true cowboy and he truly valued his livestock. He richly enjoyed helping Gene and Barbara work cattle, as both were a huge part of his life. Clax lived a life of integrity and determination and will be greatly missed. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Daisy; two children Carol (Bill) Rogers of Wiggins, Colo., and Gene Duvall of Seibert, Colo.; six grandchildren Frank Rogers of Taylors, S.C., Shari Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Larry Matschke and Earl Matschke both of Seibert, Colo., Jessie Matschke of Loveland, Colo., and Anna Matschke of Ft. Collins, Colo.; eight great-grandchildren Natalie, Blake and Adam Rogers of South Carolina, Bryce, Drew and Kyle Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Tori Thorson and Austin Matschke of Seibert, Colo.; two brother Kip Duvall of Florida and Marion Duvall of Texas; three sisters; Neva Jane Amen of Kansas, Pearl Akers of Louisiana and Georgia Cantrell of Texas; and many nieces, nephews and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, his daughter-in-law Barbara Duvall whom Clax was especially close to because she was always available and ready to help Clax and Daisy, one brother Joe Clancy Duvall, four sisters, Mary Arnold, Polly Chase, Lilly Dodd and Morina Price and one great-grandson, Devan Matschke. Memorial services were held June 3, 2011 at the United Methodist Church in Kit Carson, Colo. Interment was at Kit Carson Cemetery. Friends and family can register online condolences and sign the guest book at BrownFuneralDirectors.com. Claxton Wade Duvall, 89, passed away May 29, 2011 in Cheyenne Wells, Colo. He was born on June 8, 1921 in Beaver County, Okla. He was the third of 11 children to Belmer Duvall and Fronia Wade Duvall. “Clax,” as he became affectionately known as, attended the Greenoudh High School, graduating in 1939. On January 1, 1945, Clax was united in marriage to Daisy Wall. Clax and Daisy moved to Wild Horse, Colo., in 1948 where they suitcase farmed until 1952. Clax and Daisy decided to make Colorado their home and raise their family and continue to farm and ranch north of Wild Horse, Colo. Clax loved the sport of rodeo. He particularly loved to bulldog and calf rope. In 1955 he earned the Colorado Champion Bulldogger award. Clax served as a Cheyenne County commissioner in the 1980s. Clax loved his life, his family and his many friends. He was a devoted member of the Kit Carson United Methodist Church. Clax was most happy when he was working with his cattle and horses. Clax was a true cowboy and he truly valued his livestock. He richly enjoyed helping Gene and Barbara work cattle, as both were a huge part of his life. Clax lived a life of integrity and determination and will be greatly missed. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Daisy; two children Carol (Bill) Rogers of Wiggins, Colo., and Gene Duvall of Seibert, Colo.; six grandchildren Frank Rogers of Taylors, S.C., Shari Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Larry Matschke and Earl Matschke both of Seibert, Colo., Jessie Matschke of Loveland, Colo., and Anna Matschke of Ft. Collins, Colo.; eight great-grandchildren Natalie, Blake and Adam Rogers of South Carolina, Bryce, Drew and Kyle Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Tori Thorson and Austin Matschke of Seibert, Colo.; two brother Kip Duvall of Florida and Marion Duvall of Texas; three sisters; Neva Jane Amen of Kansas, Pearl Akers of Louisiana and Georgia Cantrell of Texas; and many nieces, nephews and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, his daughter-in-law Barbara Duvall whom Clax was especially close to because she was always available and ready to help Clax and Daisy, one brother Joe Clancy Duvall, four sisters, Mary Arnold, Polly Chase, Lilly Dodd and Morina Price and one great-grandson, Devan Matschke. Memorial services were held June 3, 2011 at the United Methodist Church in Kit Carson, Colo. Interment was at Kit Carson Cemetery. Friends and family can register online condolences and sign the guest book at BrownFuneralDirectors.com. Claxton Wade Duvall, 89, passed away May 29, 2011 in Cheyenne Wells, Colo. He was born on June 8, 1921 in Beaver County, Okla. He was the third of 11 children to Belmer Duvall and Fronia Wade Duvall. “Clax,” as he became affectionately known as, attended the Greenoudh High School, graduating in 1939. On January 1, 1945, Clax was united in marriage to Daisy Wall. Clax and Daisy moved to Wild Horse, Colo., in 1948 where they suitcase farmed until 1952. Clax and Daisy decided to make Colorado their home and raise their family and continue to farm and ranch north of Wild Horse, Colo. Clax loved the sport of rodeo. He particularly loved to bulldog and calf rope. In 1955 he earned the Colorado Champion Bulldogger award. Clax served as a Cheyenne County commissioner in the 1980s. Clax loved his life, his family and his many friends. He was a devoted member of the Kit Carson United Methodist Church. Clax was most happy when he was working with his cattle and horses. Clax was a true cowboy and he truly valued his livestock. He richly enjoyed helping Gene and Barbara work cattle, as both were a huge part of his life. Clax lived a life of integrity and determination and will be greatly missed. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Daisy; two children Carol (Bill) Rogers of Wiggins, Colo., and Gene Duvall of Seibert, Colo.; six grandchildren Frank Rogers of Taylors, S.C., Shari Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Larry Matschke and Earl Matschke both of Seibert, Colo., Jessie Matschke of Loveland, Colo., and Anna Matschke of Ft. Collins, Colo.; eight great-grandchildren Natalie, Blake and Adam Rogers of South Carolina, Bryce, Drew and Kyle Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Tori Thorson and Austin Matschke of Seibert, Colo.; two brother Kip Duvall of Florida and Marion Duvall of Texas; three sisters; Neva Jane Amen of Kansas, Pearl Akers of Louisiana and Georgia Cantrell of Texas; and many nieces, nephews and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, his daughter-in-law Barbara Duvall whom Clax was especially close to because she was always available and ready to help Clax and Daisy, one brother Joe Clancy Duvall, four sisters, Mary Arnold, Polly Chase, Lilly Dodd and Morina Price and one great-grandson, Devan Matschke. Memorial services were held June 3, 2011 at the United Methodist Church in Kit Carson, Colo. Interment was at Kit Carson Cemetery. Friends and family can register online condolences and sign the guest book at BrownFuneralDirectors.com. Claxton Wade Duvall, 89, passed away May 29, 2011 in Cheyenne Wells, Colo. He was born on June 8, 1921 in Beaver County, Okla. He was the third of 11 children to Belmer Duvall and Fronia Wade Duvall. “Clax,” as he became affectionately known as, attended the Greenoudh High School, graduating in 1939. On January 1, 1945, Clax was united in marriage to Daisy Wall. Clax and Daisy moved to Wild Horse, Colo., in 1948 where they suitcase farmed until 1952. Clax and Daisy decided to make Colorado their home and raise their family and continue to farm and ranch north of Wild Horse, Colo. Clax loved the sport of rodeo. He particularly loved to bulldog and calf rope. In 1955 he earned the Colorado Champion Bulldogger award. Clax served as a Cheyenne County commissioner in the 1980s. Clax loved his life, his family and his many friends. He was a devoted member of the Kit Carson United Methodist Church. Clax was most happy when he was working with his cattle and horses. Clax was a true cowboy and he truly valued his livestock. He richly enjoyed helping Gene and Barbara work cattle, as both were a huge part of his life. Clax lived a life of integrity and determination and will be greatly missed. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Daisy; two children Carol (Bill) Rogers of Wiggins, Colo., and Gene Duvall of Seibert, Colo.; six grandchildren Frank Rogers of Taylors, S.C., Shari Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Larry Matschke and Earl Matschke both of Seibert, Colo., Jessie Matschke of Loveland, Colo., and Anna Matschke of Ft. Collins, Colo.; eight great-grandchildren Natalie, Blake and Adam Rogers of South Carolina, Bryce, Drew and Kyle Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Tori Thorson and Austin Matschke of Seibert, Colo.; two brother Kip Duvall of Florida and Marion Duvall of Texas; three sisters; Neva Jane Amen of Kansas, Pearl Akers of Louisiana and Georgia Cantrell of Texas; and many nieces, nephews and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, his daughter-in-law Barbara Duvall whom Clax was especially close to because she was always available and ready to help Clax and Daisy, one brother Joe Clancy Duvall, four sisters, Mary Arnold, Polly Chase, Lilly Dodd and Morina Price and one great-grandson, Devan Matschke. Memorial services were held June 3, 2011 at the United Methodist Church in Kit Carson, Colo. Interment was at Kit Carson Cemetery. Friends and family can register online condolences and sign the guest book at BrownFuneralDirectors.com. Claxton Wade Duvall, 89, passed away May 29, 2011 in Cheyenne Wells, Colo. He was born on June 8, 1921 in Beaver County, Okla. He was the third of 11 children to Belmer Duvall and Fronia Wade Duvall. “Clax,” as he became affectionately known as, attended the Greenoudh High School, graduating in 1939. On January 1, 1945, Clax was united in marriage to Daisy Wall. Clax and Daisy moved to Wild Horse, Colo., in 1948 where they suitcase farmed until 1952. Clax and Daisy decided to make Colorado their home and raise their family and continue to farm and ranch north of Wild Horse, Colo. Clax loved the sport of rodeo. He particularly loved to bulldog and calf rope. In 1955 he earned the Colorado Champion Bulldogger award. Clax served as a Cheyenne County commissioner in the 1980s. Clax loved his life, his family and his many friends. He was a devoted member of the Kit Carson United Methodist Church. Clax was most happy when he was working with his cattle and horses. Clax was a true cowboy and he truly valued his livestock. He richly enjoyed helping Gene and Barbara work cattle, as both were a huge part of his life. Clax lived a life of integrity and determination and will be greatly missed. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Daisy; two children Carol (Bill) Rogers of Wiggins, Colo., and Gene Duvall of Seibert, Colo.; six grandchildren Frank Rogers of Taylors, S.C., Shari Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Larry Matschke and Earl Matschke both of Seibert, Colo., Jessie Matschke of Loveland, Colo., and Anna Matschke of Ft. Collins, Colo.; eight great-grandchildren Natalie, Blake and Adam Rogers of South Carolina, Bryce, Drew and Kyle Remmenga of Grand Junction, Colo., Tori Thorson and Austin Matschke of Seibert, Colo.; two brother Kip Duvall of Florida and Marion Duvall of Texas; three sisters; Neva Jane Amen of Kansas, Pearl Akers of Louisiana and Georgia Cantrell of Texas; and many nieces, nephews and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, his daughter-in-law Barbara Duvall whom Clax was especially close to because she was always available and ready to help Clax and Daisy, one brother Joe Clancy Duvall, four sisters, Mary Arnold, Polly Chase, Lilly Dodd and Morina Price and one great-grandson, Devan Matschke. Memorial services were held June 3, 2011 at the United Methodist Church in Kit Carson, Colo. Interment was at Kit Carson Cemetery. Friends and family can register online condolences and sign the guest book at BrownFuneralDirectors.com.

Texas Longhorn Show June 18

Texas Longhorn cattle, with roots tracing back to the earliest cattle brought over to the “new world” from Spain, were the original reason for cowboys and cattle drives following the Civil War. The breed nearly died out by the 1950s, but a handful of ranchers kept it going long enough to realize renewed interest in Longhorn cattle by the 1970s. Today the breed is represented throughout the United States, valued as a source of lean beef as well as colorful “pasture ornaments” and even pets. A large gathering of these cattle will be on display and judged for color, conformation and horn-length beginning at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 18, at the annual Heart of the Rockies Texas Longhorn Show, northeast of Colorado Springs, Colo. The show is open to the public with no charge for admission. The venue is Latigo Trails indoor arena, 13710 Halleluiah Tr. (just east of Meridian Rd. on Latigo Blvd. in the Black Forest). Local and out-of-state Longhorn cattle breeders will compete for awards in a variety of cattle classes. Cows with calves, heifers, steers and bulls will be shown and judged well into the afternoon. The show is sponsored by the Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association, an affiliate of the International Texas Longhorn Association. The show at Latigo will include an opening ceremony involving several large riding steers, each weighing about a ton and carrying the long, impressive horns for which the breed is named. Gary and Kay Cole of Penrose, Colo., own and show the steers, and Gary says the steers are easier to train than horses. The best candidates to break for riding are young steers that have been shown at halter by youngsters, according to Gary. The steers are saddled like a horse and are handled with reins and “nose bits,” which as the name implies, are attached to the noses. Gary says he can usually have a steer pretty well broke to ride in about 30 days. He has hauled his riding steers to events around the country, and ridden them through rings of fire and down crowded parade routes. At the Heart of the Rockies Show, Gary and company will present the flag along with a rendition of The Star Spangled Banner. The steers will also likely appear in the senior steer class at the show. Texas Longhorn owners and breeders today run the gamut of operations, ranging from those with a couple pets (“trophy steers,” perhaps) to those with 20 or 30 cows, on up to herds of 100 cows or more. Longhorn cows have always had a reputation for calving ease, meaning even the first-calf heifers usually calve successfully on their own without assistance. Longhorn bulls are also frequently used on first-calf heifers in other breeds for this same reason. Texas Longhorns are also gaining the attention of beef consumers who want to take a more direct hand in their food sources. Many Longhorn owners raise beef for their own families, plus any friends or neighbors who want lean, tender and flavorful meat for the freezer. The meat is usually processed locally, under U.S.D.A. inspection. Those who raise their own Longhorn beef in the Mountain States organization generally fall into one of two categories: those who want strictly lean, grass-fed beef; or those who want grass-fed beef that is finished off with an additional mixed-grain ration for 50 to 90 days. The latter is still usually leaner than comparable store-bought beef. Studies have shown lean Longhorn beef has less cholesterol and calories than chicken. Most small producers like these also emphasize they don’t use any medications or hormones to stimulate growth in their cattle. There are two national Texas Longhorn associations and registries, and both are headquartered in Texas. Many breeders belong to both organizations and one or both of their regional affiliates. The MSTLA welcomes new members, with or without cattle. The association meets generally on a monthly basis, often over a pot-luck lunch at someone’s house, and offers various social and educational activities, including ranch tours, cattle judging and management seminars. For more information: Mountain States Texas Longhorn Association (www.MSTLA.org), affiliated with International Texas Longhorn Association in Glen Rose, Texas (www.ITLA.org). Or Mountains and Plains Texas Longhorn Association (www.MPTLA.org), affiliated with Texas Longhorn Breeders Association of America in Fort Worth (www.TLBAA.org). For more information on the Heart of the Rockies Show, please phone (719) 749-9071.

West Slope Obituaries

, 93, of Grand Junction, Colo., passed away Thursday, June 29, 2006. Anna Emilia Travison was born February 20, 1913, in Leadville, Colo. Her mother, Emilia (Covi) Travison immigrated to the U.S. from northern Italy. Her father, Peter Travison, was a Colorado native born in Rye, Colo. He died in the 1918 flue epidemic, and her mother then married Robert Degiorgio in Leadville. When Ann was six years old, the family moved to Superior, Wyo. At the age of 20, Ann married her cowboy sweetheart, Dale Thompson, on March 13, 1933, at Sweetwater, Colo. He preceded her in death in 1994. Besides making afghans, and doing embroidery work, Ann loved to garden and grow African violets. She will be remembered for her hospitality, good cooking, generosity, gentleness and keen sense of humor. She is survived by two of her four children: Richard D. (Marilee) Thompson and Kathleen (Bill) Hollingsworth; six grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. , age 89, longtime Yampa, Colo., resident, died June 29, 2006, at Mesa Manor in Grand Junction, Colo. He was born on Sept. 27, 1916, on the homestead ranch located between Yampa and Toponas, Colo., to Clarence Earl and Pearl Adella (Reed) Crowner. Earl graduated from Yampa Union High School and attended school for one year at CU Boulder, and one year at Barnes Business School in Denver before returning to his life on the ranch. Earl married Flora Mae Smith in Phippsburg, Colo., on Nov. 7, 1937. Earl’s inventive mind designed a tanker truck that would haul gasoline in the bottom portion, and freight on the flatbed top. As a rural agent for Montgomery Ward, Earl drove “his” truck from the Yampa Valley to Denver for many years. He farmed and ranched with his father and brother, raising lettuce, spinach, cattle, and quality hay. He also helped run the Crowner and Sons lettuce packing shed in Yampa. During World War II, he remained on the ranch, providing produce for the nation and hay for the horses at the training camp of the 10th Mountain Division stationed at Pando, Colo. After the war, the Crowner families wintered in Yuma, Ariz., where Earl was foreman on a lettuce field crew. Later, he and Flora went to Phoenix, where he handled hay and straw for the Turf Paradise Race Track. The Enda Mine outside of Oak Creek, Colo., hired him as a grader operator and cat skinner for several winters, fulfilling his love for operating heavy equipment. Earl was secretary of Stillwater Ditch Company for numerous years.Earl sold the Crowner Ranch in 1998, and the couple retired to Grand Junction. He is survived by his wife of 68 years, Flora; two sons, Terry and wife Susi of Yampa, and Gary and wife Tootie of Walden, Colo.; three grandchildren: Kip and wife Margaret Crowner of Centennial, Colo., Angelique and husband Greg Dieker of Parker, Colo., and Allen and wife Teresa Crowner of Northglenn, Colo.; and four great-grandchildren. , 90, of Montrose, Colo., died Wednesday, June 28, 2006, at Montrose Memorial Hospital after a sudden illness. Lucille Boruff was born January 6, 1916, in the Coal Creek area of Montrose. Beginning her school days as a first grader the year the Coal Creek School opened in 1921, Lucille graduated from Montrose County High School in 1934 and completed the post-graduate business program in 1935. On Easter Sunday, April 21, 1935, she was married to Norval R. Shide, who engaged in farming and served on various local boards. The couple enjoyed 55 years of marriage before Norval’s death in 1990. Lucille served her community and her church in many capacities. She was the mother of two children: daughter, Signe Ann Lucille Thomass (deceased) and son, Keith Norval (Lorraine) Shide of Montrose, Colo., and the loving grandmother of two grandchildren. , 81, died Monday, July 3, 2006, after a courageous battle with leukemia. Edith Marcelle Fischer was born February 27, 1925, in Castle Rock, Wash., to Paul and Elsie Fischer. Edith moved to California as a young adult and married Lee Nash Bumguardner on September 19, 1947. Lee and Edith were cattle and sheep ranchers in the foothills near Yosemite National Park. The couple became foster parents during this time and fostered several children. They moved to DeBeque, Colo., in 1959, where they continued to ranch and open their home to foster children – more than 50 over a span of 45 years. They moved to a ranch near Mesa, Colo., in 1969. Lee and Edith were honored as Foster Parents of the Year and invited to dinner with Governor Love. Edith was a member of the DeBeque Extension Club and was a pianist for her church, the Certain Place of Seventh Day Chapel. She loved her family and spent her whole life taking care of family and friends and foster children. She is survived by her husband, Lee Nash; eight children; twelve grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and two sisters: Eileene Johnson and Stella Barger. , 89, of Grand Junction, Colo., passed away Wednesday, July 5, 2006. Katherine Marie Hall was born February 25, 1917, in Providence, Ky., to James and Gertrude (Dorris) Hall. Mrs. Hall died two weeks after giving birth to Katherine, who was then raised by her grandmother and aunt in Kentucky. In 1933 Katherine met and married Robert Beecher Thomas. To this union were born five children. Shortly after their marriage, the couple moved to the Fruitvale Valley of Colorado, where they were farmers and ranchers for many years. The family moved to Grand Junction in 1970. After Katherine became a widow in 1977, she worked in the dietary department in many of the nursing home facilities in Grand Junction, working up into her 70s. After she retired, Katherine became an avid bingo and slot machine player. Her favorite restaurant was Pancho Villa, where she was a favorite and was treated like a queen. She had a unique, witty sense of humor with a bit of an ornery streak. We celebrate her life and the joy she brought to everyone who knew and loved her. Besides her five children, she is survived by 13 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren, and eight great-great-grandchildren.

Rocky Mountain Ranch Rodeo

On July 3, there was a herd of Longhorn cattle running free in the middle of downtown Colorado Springs. The Longhorns, surrounded and driven by the cowboys (and cowgirls) of the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA), were the kickoff for the ranch rodeo to come on Saturday afternoon. The Norris-Penrose Event Center hosted the three-day Rocky Mountain Horse Expo, with the ranch rodeo as its centerpiece event. Tucked up against the foothills of Pikes Peak, the arena is one of the favorite destinations of the contestants and fans alike. The natural beauty and available sightseeing brings in some of the best ranch teams in the West. This year 12 teams representing 18 different ranches traveled from five different states to participate. Ranch rodeo is different from traditional rodeo, it is real working ranch cowboys and events, designed to look like what is done on the ranch. The Norris-Penrose crew did a great job to get the arena in shape after an early thunderstorm, and after the Grand entry, they started promptly at 5:30 with the Ranch Bronc Riding. The ranch rodeo bronc event allows the rider to use two hands if he chooses, called the “ride as ride can” rule. It is meant to be as close to real ranch style as possible. Third place went to the Crutch Ranch out of Borger, Texas, with a 77-point ride. Second spot was claimed by the Four Three Land and Cattle and FX Bar Ranch from Nebraska and Wyoming, covering for 80-points. First place in the bronc event went to the Y6 Livestock team out of the Nebraska Sandhill country near Arthur, Neb., marking a great 81-point ride for the win. The Ranch Branding and the Ranch Sorting events are two events that look most like what you might see on a real cattle ranching operation. In the Branding, the team must heel two calves from the herd and drag them to the fire to be branded (with chalk in this case) fastest time on two head wins. This year’s top brander was the Haythorn Land and Cattle Company from western Nebraska with a time of 43.81 seconds on their two calves. The Ranch Sorting involves four mounted team members in the arena, with one member cutting five consecutively numbered yearlings from the herd and the other three doing herd hold back duty. This is a slow, deliberate event, as the cowboys are trying for a fast time but don’t want any stray cattle across the line. It’s very challenging and this year the best team was the S Ranch and Sunlight Ranch cowboys out of Montana. They claimed the title with a time of 1:16. The next event was the Stray Gathering, an event much like real ranch work, and much like the real thing, it can get a little wild at times. Two yearlings are let into the arena and two pair of mounted cowboy’s head and heel it and lay him on his side. Once the yearling is down each team has to tie three legs and call time. They have three minutes to get it done – fastest time wins. The fastest time this year was turned in by the cowboys of the Sandhill Cattle Company out of Earth, Texas with a time of 1:26 for the win. By the time the last sorting team left the arena, another thunderstorm started to move over the arena and when the Wild Cow Milking event started it began to pour. The milking event is hands down one of the fan favorites, and to make it even wilder – you just need to add mud. Thanks to Mother Nature, the mud was delivered just in time, and the arena turned into an ankle deep slop, with cows, horses and cowboys joining in. With cows falling on cowboys, and cowboys falling on each other, the teams coaxed a few precious drops of milk into their longnecks, wiped the mud from their eyes and looked for the judge. The time stops when the cowboy delivers the bottle to the judge, if the judge finds milk they get a score. The top team in this years Wild Cow Milking was the Four Three Land and Cattle/FX Bar Ranch team turning in plenty of milk and a score of 34-seconds. After the milking, the rain moved on and the Jackpot Trailer Loading event was ready to go – the same muddy arena was waiting for the teams to go to work. Roping one yearling, loading him in a half-top trailer and then loading two horses in the back of the trailer is done often out on the real ranch but putting a time clock makes it a little different. The mud played its part, and made the cowboy’s job miserable, but they all “cowboyed up” and pushed, pulled, tugged and shoved until they had the four-legged mud ball in the trailer. By the time the cow is loaded, the horses are not always where you left them, so more time is used to find and load the horses. To finish the run, the cowboys must jump in the cab of the truck and close the doors. This year, the win in the Trailer Loading went to Colorado’s own Rush Creek Cattle and JOD Ranch out of Limon, Colo., with a time of 1:28. In the end the cowboys, fans and families all had fun despite the rain. After the horses were put up and a preliminary cleanup was performed, the announcer was ready to hand out the prizes. The Top Hand award, voted on by the competitors, went to Hegan Lamb of the Crutch Ranch out of Texas, winning a beautiful western print and buckle. The Top Horse award, an award given by a separate judge that looks for the horse with the best quality in every event, went to “Four Lil Smart,” owned and ridden by Craig Haythorn of the Haythorn Land and Cattle Company. This was Haythorn’s fifth consecutive Top Horse win at Colorado Springs. In the overall, the S Ranch and Sunlight Ranch placed third with a total of 29 points. The second spot was claimed by the La Junta, Colo., team of Broken Spear/San Jose ranches scoring 29.5 points. Winner of this years Ride for the Brand Championship Ranch Rodeo is the Borger, Texas team of the Crutch Ranch. Mark and Jack Mitchell, Hegan Lamb, Casey Maxwell and Chad Smith marked 34 points for the check, the buckles and the all-important trip to Amarillo in November for the WRCA world Championships. The Colorado Springs show is already on the schedule for next year, and the contestants are already making their plans, hopefully for a mud free event next year, but if not, nobody will care – they will still be here with or with out mud.