114th Cheyenne Frontier Days keeps the west alive | TheFencePost.com

114th Cheyenne Frontier Days keeps the west alive

Saddle Bronc rider Sam Spreadborough earned 77 points aboard Miss Liberty on his way to earning third place overall.

If a fan of the west starts thinking the cowboy lifestyle is on the decline, all they have to do is visit Cheyenne Frontier Days and realize it’s alive and kicking. From its huge world-class rodeo to all the western trappings a visitor could ever want, the 114th annual event was an Old West lover’s dream come true.

“We title ourselves the world’s largest outdoor rodeo and western celebration and what we’re trying to portray is our western heritage and our western way of life,” said Rod Hottle, Cheyenne Frontier Days General Chairman. “We get a good cross section of people from around the world who attend our celebration. They love Cheyenne Frontier Days, they hear about the western way of life – what are cowboys and what do cowboys do? – and it fascinates them. They love coming to see that and be a part of it.”

With estimated tallies ranging from 300,000-500,000 visitors coming to see all the happenings in the park and throughout the city of Cheyenne during the 10-day timeframe, the “Cowboy State” made a serious effort to provide them all a glimpse of the west they wouldn’t forget. Not counting all the efforts in the city of Cheyenne to entertain visitors, Frontier Park itself boasted the largest outdoor rodeo in the world, Native American culture in its Indian Village, a carnival midway, Old West Museum and shopping in its Wild Horse Gulch among re-enactors of old west history – a slice of Frontier Days becoming more popular since its inception ten years ago.

“We wanted to keep the western tradition going out there and make it look a little more western for people,” described Matt Jones, Cheyenne Frontier Days’ Concessions Committee Chairman, about the Wild Horse Gulch strip of western storefronts where visitors walk and shop among characters dressed in period-correct clothing. “When they pull up in that big parking lot, the first thing they see is something that looks old west, something old homey-towney looking. I think it’s gained a little bit of notoriety,” continued Jones. “We get the Gulch actors out there and they kind of mix it up with the crowd and interact with them and make them feel like they are a part of it, too.”

One thing the Wyoming venue knows the crowd will feel a part of every year is their world famous outdoor rodeo structure, which sold nearly 200,000 tickets for rodeos and concerts and garnered positive vibes from contestants all the way up to PRCA officials.

“It is a rodeo that is unique in terms of its size and in almost every sense,” stated Jim Bainbridge, the PRCA’s Senior Public Relations Coordinator. “With more than 1,000 competitors, with the huge arena – it’s different than a lot of our rodeos. It is one of the very special rodeos on our schedule.”

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Those working on the inside agreed with Bainbridge in a big way.

“I think there’s just a different feel for everybody at Cheyenne,” revealed Kirsten Vold, manager of the first-class Harry Vold Rodeo Company, the stock contractor at Cheyenne’s rodeo for more than three decades. “There’s so much history here, it’s so large and there are so many stories. There have been so many generations that have passed on historical moments to their kids and to their kids and to their kids,” she added with certainty. “The special part of Cheyenne to me is you don’t have to be a rodeo fan to appreciate it. So many people that aren’t really rodeo fans want to come to Cheyenne. The fact Cheyenne can bring in such a larger demographic of people and fans of all types of sports – football and NASCAR and everything throughout – they are all joined together by the intrigue of so many things that go on here in a town of 50,000. When you think about that, it’s amazing that a rodeo of this size and magnitude is really in a relatively small town. The fact they put any event of this size, whether it be a rodeo or a county fair or anything of this size, is amazing.”

Rodeo cowboys felt much the same way.

“Oh Cheyenne, everybody looks forward to it all year long because it’s a different set up than other rodeos,” said Colorado steer wrestler K.C. Jones, who made the final round and finished fourth in the average. “It’s a little more western. I still get my old heart rate up, at Cheyenne. You just can’t wait to go.”

“Oh, it’s awesome,” agreed Kelly Timberman, former PRCA world champion bareback rider and Wyoming native, about performing in front of the huge crowds there. Timberman is continually in the mix for a buckle at any rodeo, and he showed it again this year in Cheyenne with the best score in the final round to earn third place in the average and move himself up to sixth place in the PRCA standings. “When you have big crowds like that, that’s when the excitement, the electricity kind of gets going,” he continued with energy. “That’s why Cheyenne Frontier Days is so spectacular, it’s just the feeling you get when you’re there. Everybody is just excited, it’s a great summer rodeo, it’s very western, it’s jam-packed full of excitement for everybody. Cheyenne is set up to be a great western-type atmosphere rodeo. It’s exciting.”

Asked about earning a top score in the final round before thousands of home state fans, Timberman’s enthusiasm persisted.

“I’m not going to lie, that was pretty cool,” Timberman said with a laugh. “You got the best cowboys in the world there and some of the best horses, all those horses are finals horses, so it’s a big push going into the rest of the season … so that’s kind of helpful. All in all, it was a good feeling of being able to ride well in the finals there and get on great livestock in that short go.”

“We’re proud of our 114 years of being here,” summed up Chairman Hottle about the renowned rodeo and western celebration. “We take great pride in our community and our state and want to do everything we can to not only enhance Cheyenne Frontier Days, but ensure its success for the next 114 years.”

What that means is … Cheyenne keeps the west alive and kicking.

Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo Champions

• Bareback: Steven Dent

• Steer Roping: Chance Kelton

• Tie Down Roping: Clint Arave

•Saddle Bronc: Cody DeMoss

• Steer Wrestling: Cody Moore

• Team Roping: Derrick Begay/

Cesar de la Cruz

• Barrel Racing: Lindsay Sears

• Bull Riding: Wesley Silcox v

If a fan of the west starts thinking the cowboy lifestyle is on the decline, all they have to do is visit Cheyenne Frontier Days and realize it’s alive and kicking. From its huge world-class rodeo to all the western trappings a visitor could ever want, the 114th annual event was an Old West lover’s dream come true.

“We title ourselves the world’s largest outdoor rodeo and western celebration and what we’re trying to portray is our western heritage and our western way of life,” said Rod Hottle, Cheyenne Frontier Days General Chairman. “We get a good cross section of people from around the world who attend our celebration. They love Cheyenne Frontier Days, they hear about the western way of life – what are cowboys and what do cowboys do? – and it fascinates them. They love coming to see that and be a part of it.”

With estimated tallies ranging from 300,000-500,000 visitors coming to see all the happenings in the park and throughout the city of Cheyenne during the 10-day timeframe, the “Cowboy State” made a serious effort to provide them all a glimpse of the west they wouldn’t forget. Not counting all the efforts in the city of Cheyenne to entertain visitors, Frontier Park itself boasted the largest outdoor rodeo in the world, Native American culture in its Indian Village, a carnival midway, Old West Museum and shopping in its Wild Horse Gulch among re-enactors of old west history – a slice of Frontier Days becoming more popular since its inception ten years ago.

“We wanted to keep the western tradition going out there and make it look a little more western for people,” described Matt Jones, Cheyenne Frontier Days’ Concessions Committee Chairman, about the Wild Horse Gulch strip of western storefronts where visitors walk and shop among characters dressed in period-correct clothing. “When they pull up in that big parking lot, the first thing they see is something that looks old west, something old homey-towney looking. I think it’s gained a little bit of notoriety,” continued Jones. “We get the Gulch actors out there and they kind of mix it up with the crowd and interact with them and make them feel like they are a part of it, too.”

One thing the Wyoming venue knows the crowd will feel a part of every year is their world famous outdoor rodeo structure, which sold nearly 200,000 tickets for rodeos and concerts and garnered positive vibes from contestants all the way up to PRCA officials.

“It is a rodeo that is unique in terms of its size and in almost every sense,” stated Jim Bainbridge, the PRCA’s Senior Public Relations Coordinator. “With more than 1,000 competitors, with the huge arena – it’s different than a lot of our rodeos. It is one of the very special rodeos on our schedule.”

Those working on the inside agreed with Bainbridge in a big way.

“I think there’s just a different feel for everybody at Cheyenne,” revealed Kirsten Vold, manager of the first-class Harry Vold Rodeo Company, the stock contractor at Cheyenne’s rodeo for more than three decades. “There’s so much history here, it’s so large and there are so many stories. There have been so many generations that have passed on historical moments to their kids and to their kids and to their kids,” she added with certainty. “The special part of Cheyenne to me is you don’t have to be a rodeo fan to appreciate it. So many people that aren’t really rodeo fans want to come to Cheyenne. The fact Cheyenne can bring in such a larger demographic of people and fans of all types of sports – football and NASCAR and everything throughout – they are all joined together by the intrigue of so many things that go on here in a town of 50,000. When you think about that, it’s amazing that a rodeo of this size and magnitude is really in a relatively small town. The fact they put any event of this size, whether it be a rodeo or a county fair or anything of this size, is amazing.”

Rodeo cowboys felt much the same way.

“Oh Cheyenne, everybody looks forward to it all year long because it’s a different set up than other rodeos,” said Colorado steer wrestler K.C. Jones, who made the final round and finished fourth in the average. “It’s a little more western. I still get my old heart rate up, at Cheyenne. You just can’t wait to go.”

“Oh, it’s awesome,” agreed Kelly Timberman, former PRCA world champion bareback rider and Wyoming native, about performing in front of the huge crowds there. Timberman is continually in the mix for a buckle at any rodeo, and he showed it again this year in Cheyenne with the best score in the final round to earn third place in the average and move himself up to sixth place in the PRCA standings. “When you have big crowds like that, that’s when the excitement, the electricity kind of gets going,” he continued with energy. “That’s why Cheyenne Frontier Days is so spectacular, it’s just the feeling you get when you’re there. Everybody is just excited, it’s a great summer rodeo, it’s very western, it’s jam-packed full of excitement for everybody. Cheyenne is set up to be a great western-type atmosphere rodeo. It’s exciting.”

Asked about earning a top score in the final round before thousands of home state fans, Timberman’s enthusiasm persisted.

“I’m not going to lie, that was pretty cool,” Timberman said with a laugh. “You got the best cowboys in the world there and some of the best horses, all those horses are finals horses, so it’s a big push going into the rest of the season … so that’s kind of helpful. All in all, it was a good feeling of being able to ride well in the finals there and get on great livestock in that short go.”

“We’re proud of our 114 years of being here,” summed up Chairman Hottle about the renowned rodeo and western celebration. “We take great pride in our community and our state and want to do everything we can to not only enhance Cheyenne Frontier Days, but ensure its success for the next 114 years.”

What that means is … Cheyenne keeps the west alive and kicking.

Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo Champions

• Bareback: Steven Dent

• Steer Roping: Chance Kelton

• Tie Down Roping: Clint Arave

•Saddle Bronc: Cody DeMoss

• Steer Wrestling: Cody Moore

• Team Roping: Derrick Begay/

Cesar de la Cruz

• Barrel Racing: Lindsay Sears

• Bull Riding: Wesley Silcox v

If a fan of the west starts thinking the cowboy lifestyle is on the decline, all they have to do is visit Cheyenne Frontier Days and realize it’s alive and kicking. From its huge world-class rodeo to all the western trappings a visitor could ever want, the 114th annual event was an Old West lover’s dream come true.

“We title ourselves the world’s largest outdoor rodeo and western celebration and what we’re trying to portray is our western heritage and our western way of life,” said Rod Hottle, Cheyenne Frontier Days General Chairman. “We get a good cross section of people from around the world who attend our celebration. They love Cheyenne Frontier Days, they hear about the western way of life – what are cowboys and what do cowboys do? – and it fascinates them. They love coming to see that and be a part of it.”

With estimated tallies ranging from 300,000-500,000 visitors coming to see all the happenings in the park and throughout the city of Cheyenne during the 10-day timeframe, the “Cowboy State” made a serious effort to provide them all a glimpse of the west they wouldn’t forget. Not counting all the efforts in the city of Cheyenne to entertain visitors, Frontier Park itself boasted the largest outdoor rodeo in the world, Native American culture in its Indian Village, a carnival midway, Old West Museum and shopping in its Wild Horse Gulch among re-enactors of old west history – a slice of Frontier Days becoming more popular since its inception ten years ago.

“We wanted to keep the western tradition going out there and make it look a little more western for people,” described Matt Jones, Cheyenne Frontier Days’ Concessions Committee Chairman, about the Wild Horse Gulch strip of western storefronts where visitors walk and shop among characters dressed in period-correct clothing. “When they pull up in that big parking lot, the first thing they see is something that looks old west, something old homey-towney looking. I think it’s gained a little bit of notoriety,” continued Jones. “We get the Gulch actors out there and they kind of mix it up with the crowd and interact with them and make them feel like they are a part of it, too.”

One thing the Wyoming venue knows the crowd will feel a part of every year is their world famous outdoor rodeo structure, which sold nearly 200,000 tickets for rodeos and concerts and garnered positive vibes from contestants all the way up to PRCA officials.

“It is a rodeo that is unique in terms of its size and in almost every sense,” stated Jim Bainbridge, the PRCA’s Senior Public Relations Coordinator. “With more than 1,000 competitors, with the huge arena – it’s different than a lot of our rodeos. It is one of the very special rodeos on our schedule.”

Those working on the inside agreed with Bainbridge in a big way.

“I think there’s just a different feel for everybody at Cheyenne,” revealed Kirsten Vold, manager of the first-class Harry Vold Rodeo Company, the stock contractor at Cheyenne’s rodeo for more than three decades. “There’s so much history here, it’s so large and there are so many stories. There have been so many generations that have passed on historical moments to their kids and to their kids and to their kids,” she added with certainty. “The special part of Cheyenne to me is you don’t have to be a rodeo fan to appreciate it. So many people that aren’t really rodeo fans want to come to Cheyenne. The fact Cheyenne can bring in such a larger demographic of people and fans of all types of sports – football and NASCAR and everything throughout – they are all joined together by the intrigue of so many things that go on here in a town of 50,000. When you think about that, it’s amazing that a rodeo of this size and magnitude is really in a relatively small town. The fact they put any event of this size, whether it be a rodeo or a county fair or anything of this size, is amazing.”

Rodeo cowboys felt much the same way.

“Oh Cheyenne, everybody looks forward to it all year long because it’s a different set up than other rodeos,” said Colorado steer wrestler K.C. Jones, who made the final round and finished fourth in the average. “It’s a little more western. I still get my old heart rate up, at Cheyenne. You just can’t wait to go.”

“Oh, it’s awesome,” agreed Kelly Timberman, former PRCA world champion bareback rider and Wyoming native, about performing in front of the huge crowds there. Timberman is continually in the mix for a buckle at any rodeo, and he showed it again this year in Cheyenne with the best score in the final round to earn third place in the average and move himself up to sixth place in the PRCA standings. “When you have big crowds like that, that’s when the excitement, the electricity kind of gets going,” he continued with energy. “That’s why Cheyenne Frontier Days is so spectacular, it’s just the feeling you get when you’re there. Everybody is just excited, it’s a great summer rodeo, it’s very western, it’s jam-packed full of excitement for everybody. Cheyenne is set up to be a great western-type atmosphere rodeo. It’s exciting.”

Asked about earning a top score in the final round before thousands of home state fans, Timberman’s enthusiasm persisted.

“I’m not going to lie, that was pretty cool,” Timberman said with a laugh. “You got the best cowboys in the world there and some of the best horses, all those horses are finals horses, so it’s a big push going into the rest of the season … so that’s kind of helpful. All in all, it was a good feeling of being able to ride well in the finals there and get on great livestock in that short go.”

“We’re proud of our 114 years of being here,” summed up Chairman Hottle about the renowned rodeo and western celebration. “We take great pride in our community and our state and want to do everything we can to not only enhance Cheyenne Frontier Days, but ensure its success for the next 114 years.”

What that means is … Cheyenne keeps the west alive and kicking.

Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo Champions

• Bareback: Steven Dent

• Steer Roping: Chance Kelton

• Tie Down Roping: Clint Arave

•Saddle Bronc: Cody DeMoss

• Steer Wrestling: Cody Moore

• Team Roping: Derrick Begay/

Cesar de la Cruz

• Barrel Racing: Lindsay Sears

• Bull Riding: Wesley Silcox v

If a fan of the west starts thinking the cowboy lifestyle is on the decline, all they have to do is visit Cheyenne Frontier Days and realize it’s alive and kicking. From its huge world-class rodeo to all the western trappings a visitor could ever want, the 114th annual event was an Old West lover’s dream come true.

“We title ourselves the world’s largest outdoor rodeo and western celebration and what we’re trying to portray is our western heritage and our western way of life,” said Rod Hottle, Cheyenne Frontier Days General Chairman. “We get a good cross section of people from around the world who attend our celebration. They love Cheyenne Frontier Days, they hear about the western way of life – what are cowboys and what do cowboys do? – and it fascinates them. They love coming to see that and be a part of it.”

With estimated tallies ranging from 300,000-500,000 visitors coming to see all the happenings in the park and throughout the city of Cheyenne during the 10-day timeframe, the “Cowboy State” made a serious effort to provide them all a glimpse of the west they wouldn’t forget. Not counting all the efforts in the city of Cheyenne to entertain visitors, Frontier Park itself boasted the largest outdoor rodeo in the world, Native American culture in its Indian Village, a carnival midway, Old West Museum and shopping in its Wild Horse Gulch among re-enactors of old west history – a slice of Frontier Days becoming more popular since its inception ten years ago.

“We wanted to keep the western tradition going out there and make it look a little more western for people,” described Matt Jones, Cheyenne Frontier Days’ Concessions Committee Chairman, about the Wild Horse Gulch strip of western storefronts where visitors walk and shop among characters dressed in period-correct clothing. “When they pull up in that big parking lot, the first thing they see is something that looks old west, something old homey-towney looking. I think it’s gained a little bit of notoriety,” continued Jones. “We get the Gulch actors out there and they kind of mix it up with the crowd and interact with them and make them feel like they are a part of it, too.”

One thing the Wyoming venue knows the crowd will feel a part of every year is their world famous outdoor rodeo structure, which sold nearly 200,000 tickets for rodeos and concerts and garnered positive vibes from contestants all the way up to PRCA officials.

“It is a rodeo that is unique in terms of its size and in almost every sense,” stated Jim Bainbridge, the PRCA’s Senior Public Relations Coordinator. “With more than 1,000 competitors, with the huge arena – it’s different than a lot of our rodeos. It is one of the very special rodeos on our schedule.”

Those working on the inside agreed with Bainbridge in a big way.

“I think there’s just a different feel for everybody at Cheyenne,” revealed Kirsten Vold, manager of the first-class Harry Vold Rodeo Company, the stock contractor at Cheyenne’s rodeo for more than three decades. “There’s so much history here, it’s so large and there are so many stories. There have been so many generations that have passed on historical moments to their kids and to their kids and to their kids,” she added with certainty. “The special part of Cheyenne to me is you don’t have to be a rodeo fan to appreciate it. So many people that aren’t really rodeo fans want to come to Cheyenne. The fact Cheyenne can bring in such a larger demographic of people and fans of all types of sports – football and NASCAR and everything throughout – they are all joined together by the intrigue of so many things that go on here in a town of 50,000. When you think about that, it’s amazing that a rodeo of this size and magnitude is really in a relatively small town. The fact they put any event of this size, whether it be a rodeo or a county fair or anything of this size, is amazing.”

Rodeo cowboys felt much the same way.

“Oh Cheyenne, everybody looks forward to it all year long because it’s a different set up than other rodeos,” said Colorado steer wrestler K.C. Jones, who made the final round and finished fourth in the average. “It’s a little more western. I still get my old heart rate up, at Cheyenne. You just can’t wait to go.”

“Oh, it’s awesome,” agreed Kelly Timberman, former PRCA world champion bareback rider and Wyoming native, about performing in front of the huge crowds there. Timberman is continually in the mix for a buckle at any rodeo, and he showed it again this year in Cheyenne with the best score in the final round to earn third place in the average and move himself up to sixth place in the PRCA standings. “When you have big crowds like that, that’s when the excitement, the electricity kind of gets going,” he continued with energy. “That’s why Cheyenne Frontier Days is so spectacular, it’s just the feeling you get when you’re there. Everybody is just excited, it’s a great summer rodeo, it’s very western, it’s jam-packed full of excitement for everybody. Cheyenne is set up to be a great western-type atmosphere rodeo. It’s exciting.”

Asked about earning a top score in the final round before thousands of home state fans, Timberman’s enthusiasm persisted.

“I’m not going to lie, that was pretty cool,” Timberman said with a laugh. “You got the best cowboys in the world there and some of the best horses, all those horses are finals horses, so it’s a big push going into the rest of the season … so that’s kind of helpful. All in all, it was a good feeling of being able to ride well in the finals there and get on great livestock in that short go.”

“We’re proud of our 114 years of being here,” summed up Chairman Hottle about the renowned rodeo and western celebration. “We take great pride in our community and our state and want to do everything we can to not only enhance Cheyenne Frontier Days, but ensure its success for the next 114 years.”

What that means is … Cheyenne keeps the west alive and kicking.

Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo Champions

• Bareback: Steven Dent

• Steer Roping: Chance Kelton

• Tie Down Roping: Clint Arave

•Saddle Bronc: Cody DeMoss

• Steer Wrestling: Cody Moore

• Team Roping: Derrick Begay/

Cesar de la Cruz

• Barrel Racing: Lindsay Sears

• Bull Riding: Wesley Silcox v

If a fan of the west starts thinking the cowboy lifestyle is on the decline, all they have to do is visit Cheyenne Frontier Days and realize it’s alive and kicking. From its huge world-class rodeo to all the western trappings a visitor could ever want, the 114th annual event was an Old West lover’s dream come true.

“We title ourselves the world’s largest outdoor rodeo and western celebration and what we’re trying to portray is our western heritage and our western way of life,” said Rod Hottle, Cheyenne Frontier Days General Chairman. “We get a good cross section of people from around the world who attend our celebration. They love Cheyenne Frontier Days, they hear about the western way of life – what are cowboys and what do cowboys do? – and it fascinates them. They love coming to see that and be a part of it.”

With estimated tallies ranging from 300,000-500,000 visitors coming to see all the happenings in the park and throughout the city of Cheyenne during the 10-day timeframe, the “Cowboy State” made a serious effort to provide them all a glimpse of the west they wouldn’t forget. Not counting all the efforts in the city of Cheyenne to entertain visitors, Frontier Park itself boasted the largest outdoor rodeo in the world, Native American culture in its Indian Village, a carnival midway, Old West Museum and shopping in its Wild Horse Gulch among re-enactors of old west history – a slice of Frontier Days becoming more popular since its inception ten years ago.

“We wanted to keep the western tradition going out there and make it look a little more western for people,” described Matt Jones, Cheyenne Frontier Days’ Concessions Committee Chairman, about the Wild Horse Gulch strip of western storefronts where visitors walk and shop among characters dressed in period-correct clothing. “When they pull up in that big parking lot, the first thing they see is something that looks old west, something old homey-towney looking. I think it’s gained a little bit of notoriety,” continued Jones. “We get the Gulch actors out there and they kind of mix it up with the crowd and interact with them and make them feel like they are a part of it, too.”

One thing the Wyoming venue knows the crowd will feel a part of every year is their world famous outdoor rodeo structure, which sold nearly 200,000 tickets for rodeos and concerts and garnered positive vibes from contestants all the way up to PRCA officials.

“It is a rodeo that is unique in terms of its size and in almost every sense,” stated Jim Bainbridge, the PRCA’s Senior Public Relations Coordinator. “With more than 1,000 competitors, with the huge arena – it’s different than a lot of our rodeos. It is one of the very special rodeos on our schedule.”

Those working on the inside agreed with Bainbridge in a big way.

“I think there’s just a different feel for everybody at Cheyenne,” revealed Kirsten Vold, manager of the first-class Harry Vold Rodeo Company, the stock contractor at Cheyenne’s rodeo for more than three decades. “There’s so much history here, it’s so large and there are so many stories. There have been so many generations that have passed on historical moments to their kids and to their kids and to their kids,” she added with certainty. “The special part of Cheyenne to me is you don’t have to be a rodeo fan to appreciate it. So many people that aren’t really rodeo fans want to come to Cheyenne. The fact Cheyenne can bring in such a larger demographic of people and fans of all types of sports – football and NASCAR and everything throughout – they are all joined together by the intrigue of so many things that go on here in a town of 50,000. When you think about that, it’s amazing that a rodeo of this size and magnitude is really in a relatively small town. The fact they put any event of this size, whether it be a rodeo or a county fair or anything of this size, is amazing.”

Rodeo cowboys felt much the same way.

“Oh Cheyenne, everybody looks forward to it all year long because it’s a different set up than other rodeos,” said Colorado steer wrestler K.C. Jones, who made the final round and finished fourth in the average. “It’s a little more western. I still get my old heart rate up, at Cheyenne. You just can’t wait to go.”

“Oh, it’s awesome,” agreed Kelly Timberman, former PRCA world champion bareback rider and Wyoming native, about performing in front of the huge crowds there. Timberman is continually in the mix for a buckle at any rodeo, and he showed it again this year in Cheyenne with the best score in the final round to earn third place in the average and move himself up to sixth place in the PRCA standings. “When you have big crowds like that, that’s when the excitement, the electricity kind of gets going,” he continued with energy. “That’s why Cheyenne Frontier Days is so spectacular, it’s just the feeling you get when you’re there. Everybody is just excited, it’s a great summer rodeo, it’s very western, it’s jam-packed full of excitement for everybody. Cheyenne is set up to be a great western-type atmosphere rodeo. It’s exciting.”

Asked about earning a top score in the final round before thousands of home state fans, Timberman’s enthusiasm persisted.

“I’m not going to lie, that was pretty cool,” Timberman said with a laugh. “You got the best cowboys in the world there and some of the best horses, all those horses are finals horses, so it’s a big push going into the rest of the season … so that’s kind of helpful. All in all, it was a good feeling of being able to ride well in the finals there and get on great livestock in that short go.”

“We’re proud of our 114 years of being here,” summed up Chairman Hottle about the renowned rodeo and western celebration. “We take great pride in our community and our state and want to do everything we can to not only enhance Cheyenne Frontier Days, but ensure its success for the next 114 years.”

What that means is … Cheyenne keeps the west alive and kicking.

Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo Champions

• Bareback: Steven Dent

• Steer Roping: Chance Kelton

• Tie Down Roping: Clint Arave

•Saddle Bronc: Cody DeMoss

• Steer Wrestling: Cody Moore

• Team Roping: Derrick Begay/

Cesar de la Cruz

• Barrel Racing: Lindsay Sears

• Bull Riding: Wesley Silcox v

If a fan of the west starts thinking the cowboy lifestyle is on the decline, all they have to do is visit Cheyenne Frontier Days and realize it’s alive and kicking. From its huge world-class rodeo to all the western trappings a visitor could ever want, the 114th annual event was an Old West lover’s dream come true.

“We title ourselves the world’s largest outdoor rodeo and western celebration and what we’re trying to portray is our western heritage and our western way of life,” said Rod Hottle, Cheyenne Frontier Days General Chairman. “We get a good cross section of people from around the world who attend our celebration. They love Cheyenne Frontier Days, they hear about the western way of life – what are cowboys and what do cowboys do? – and it fascinates them. They love coming to see that and be a part of it.”

With estimated tallies ranging from 300,000-500,000 visitors coming to see all the happenings in the park and throughout the city of Cheyenne during the 10-day timeframe, the “Cowboy State” made a serious effort to provide them all a glimpse of the west they wouldn’t forget. Not counting all the efforts in the city of Cheyenne to entertain visitors, Frontier Park itself boasted the largest outdoor rodeo in the world, Native American culture in its Indian Village, a carnival midway, Old West Museum and shopping in its Wild Horse Gulch among re-enactors of old west history – a slice of Frontier Days becoming more popular since its inception ten years ago.

“We wanted to keep the western tradition going out there and make it look a little more western for people,” described Matt Jones, Cheyenne Frontier Days’ Concessions Committee Chairman, about the Wild Horse Gulch strip of western storefronts where visitors walk and shop among characters dressed in period-correct clothing. “When they pull up in that big parking lot, the first thing they see is something that looks old west, something old homey-towney looking. I think it’s gained a little bit of notoriety,” continued Jones. “We get the Gulch actors out there and they kind of mix it up with the crowd and interact with them and make them feel like they are a part of it, too.”

One thing the Wyoming venue knows the crowd will feel a part of every year is their world famous outdoor rodeo structure, which sold nearly 200,000 tickets for rodeos and concerts and garnered positive vibes from contestants all the way up to PRCA officials.

“It is a rodeo that is unique in terms of its size and in almost every sense,” stated Jim Bainbridge, the PRCA’s Senior Public Relations Coordinator. “With more than 1,000 competitors, with the huge arena – it’s different than a lot of our rodeos. It is one of the very special rodeos on our schedule.”

Those working on the inside agreed with Bainbridge in a big way.

“I think there’s just a different feel for everybody at Cheyenne,” revealed Kirsten Vold, manager of the first-class Harry Vold Rodeo Company, the stock contractor at Cheyenne’s rodeo for more than three decades. “There’s so much history here, it’s so large and there are so many stories. There have been so many generations that have passed on historical moments to their kids and to their kids and to their kids,” she added with certainty. “The special part of Cheyenne to me is you don’t have to be a rodeo fan to appreciate it. So many people that aren’t really rodeo fans want to come to Cheyenne. The fact Cheyenne can bring in such a larger demographic of people and fans of all types of sports – football and NASCAR and everything throughout – they are all joined together by the intrigue of so many things that go on here in a town of 50,000. When you think about that, it’s amazing that a rodeo of this size and magnitude is really in a relatively small town. The fact they put any event of this size, whether it be a rodeo or a county fair or anything of this size, is amazing.”

Rodeo cowboys felt much the same way.

“Oh Cheyenne, everybody looks forward to it all year long because it’s a different set up than other rodeos,” said Colorado steer wrestler K.C. Jones, who made the final round and finished fourth in the average. “It’s a little more western. I still get my old heart rate up, at Cheyenne. You just can’t wait to go.”

“Oh, it’s awesome,” agreed Kelly Timberman, former PRCA world champion bareback rider and Wyoming native, about performing in front of the huge crowds there. Timberman is continually in the mix for a buckle at any rodeo, and he showed it again this year in Cheyenne with the best score in the final round to earn third place in the average and move himself up to sixth place in the PRCA standings. “When you have big crowds like that, that’s when the excitement, the electricity kind of gets going,” he continued with energy. “That’s why Cheyenne Frontier Days is so spectacular, it’s just the feeling you get when you’re there. Everybody is just excited, it’s a great summer rodeo, it’s very western, it’s jam-packed full of excitement for everybody. Cheyenne is set up to be a great western-type atmosphere rodeo. It’s exciting.”

Asked about earning a top score in the final round before thousands of home state fans, Timberman’s enthusiasm persisted.

“I’m not going to lie, that was pretty cool,” Timberman said with a laugh. “You got the best cowboys in the world there and some of the best horses, all those horses are finals horses, so it’s a big push going into the rest of the season … so that’s kind of helpful. All in all, it was a good feeling of being able to ride well in the finals there and get on great livestock in that short go.”

“We’re proud of our 114 years of being here,” summed up Chairman Hottle about the renowned rodeo and western celebration. “We take great pride in our community and our state and want to do everything we can to not only enhance Cheyenne Frontier Days, but ensure its success for the next 114 years.”

What that means is … Cheyenne keeps the west alive and kicking.

Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo Champions

• Bareback: Steven Dent

• Steer Roping: Chance Kelton

• Tie Down Roping: Clint Arave

•Saddle Bronc: Cody DeMoss

• Steer Wrestling: Cody Moore

• Team Roping: Derrick Begay/

Cesar de la Cruz

• Barrel Racing: Lindsay Sears

• Bull Riding: Wesley Silcox v