115th Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo | TheFencePost.com

115th Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo

Tater Hins nailed down second place in the average with solid rides like this one for 82 points

No sport represents the West like the sport of rodeo, and no city represents rodeo like Cheyenne, Wyo. Since its first six-hour performance 115 years ago, cowboys have circled Cheyenne Frontier Days (CFD) on their calendars in bold ink. The list of past and present competitors is a who’s-who of the sport, including legends like the late 16-time world champion, Jim Shoulders, who won more buckles than anyone else at the historic rodeo.

“Cheyenne used to be a happening,” recalled the ProRodeo Hall of Famer in a 2005 telephone conversation two years before he passed away. “It was one-of-a-kind when I got there (in the 1940s). The town was strictly rodeo. It was Frontier Days all that week and the week before.”

Legends aren’t the only ones who appreciate Cheyenne. The famous venue is an equal opportunity provider of life-changing moments, a fact 24-year-old bareback rider Casey Colletti experienced firsthand in 2011. The Pueblo, Colo., cowboy strung together three solid rides – including the best one of his career – to win the prestigious CFD buckle and pocket more than $18,000 in the process. Like Shoulders before him, Colletti will always remember winning Cheyenne … as soon as it sinks in.

“It still doesn’t seem like it has happened yet,” said Colletti a few days later about his winning ride of 89 points in the final round. “It was awesome, because it was the highest marked bareback ride I’ve ever had in my life (and) that was a pretty cool place to do it. I had my family there to watch it and there were a lot of my friends and buddies there that are bareback riders that got to watch it, too. It was a pretty cool feeling.”

Asked regarding his experience in the arena, Colletti’s memory was fresh.

“Oh, it was pretty intense,” he said with enthusiasm. “That horse kind of got me fired up at first, because he got to jumping around in the bucking chute. He definitely was a powerful bucker. It felt like one of the better bareback rides I had,” he revealed about his winning effort. “I didn’t know how many points it was going to be, but I felt like it went pretty good.”

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Colletti’s unexpected victory had everyone buzzing at Cheyenne.

“It was exciting to have a home state guy, Casey Colletti from Colorado – right there in Pueblo, Colo., where we’re from – win the bareback riding.” said Kirsten Vold of Vold Rodeo Company, the highly regarded contractor that has supplied stock to CFD for the last 36 years. “He did a great job and that’s always exciting.”

Another person excited at 2011’s outcome was veteran competitor K.C. Jones of Burlington, Wyo. The home state cowboy has vied for the coveted All Around title in Cheyenne since 1991 and finally achieved his goal this year by earning almost $11,000 in team roping, tie-down roping and steer roping.

“It’s my big rodeo,” said Jones a few days after the rodeo’s completion. “I’ve won the All Around (title) at a lot of rodeos … gosh, I don’t know how many All Around buckles that I’ve won, but this is the first time I was able to win Cheyenne’s All Around buckle.”

Asked about the feeling of competing inside the huge arena in front of massive crowds, Jones answered with enthusiasm.

“Oh, it’s a rush,” he said in reply. “It’s just a great rodeo. The long score makes you have to show up with a good horse,” he described of the unique Cheyenne rules where each steer and calf are bigger and get a longer head start. As a result, the times are longer and the speed required on horseback to catch the animals is impressive.

“We just don’t have that many long scores anymore, so it’s great to go to a rodeo where they have a long score like that,” Jones continued. “When you spend your life trying to learn these cowboy skills, it’s nice to go to a place where they test them.”

Another surprise buckle winner came in the barrel racing event, where Elbert, Colo., cowgirl Kim Schulze bested a world-class field with a trio of fast times.

“To place in all three rounds is pretty amazing here,” said Schulze in an interview with CFD personnel. Schulze pocketed about $13,000 aboard a horse she received seven years ago from four-time world champ Kristie Peterson, who was a neighbor at the time. “I got some very good wisdom from Kristie Peterson, who told me to try to make my run for my horse and not worry about anyone else.”

Stories and history are made every year in Cheyenne, a venue unlike any other in the sport. Asked to compare the feeling of CFD to other rodeos, Kirsten Vold acknowledged the giant venue’s unique atmosphere.

“It’s really not fair to compare Cheyenne to other rodeos, because there are just so many things that are different there,” Vold said from experience. “They are kind of their own entity. They kind of re-write the rules and re-write the book. To be involved with anything of that magnitude and that large is always a great honor. We have over 5,000 volunteers in a town that has a population of 50,000,” Vold added about the community’s passion for their rodeo. ” To be a part of anything that big is great and … we’re very proud to be associated with a rodeo that size.”

Cheyenne’s importance to rodeo careers might best be understood from the mouths of 2011’s winning competitors.

“It’s Cheyenne,” said Colletti with laughter when discussing how it felt to earn the prestigious buckle. “I read something (winning bull rider) Shane Proctor wrote the other day. He said, ‘it’s got to be cool … they write songs about it.’ He’s right,” summed up the happy Coloradoan. “It’s hard to even imagine.”

No sport represents the West like the sport of rodeo, and no city represents rodeo like Cheyenne, Wyo. Since its first six-hour performance 115 years ago, cowboys have circled Cheyenne Frontier Days (CFD) on their calendars in bold ink. The list of past and present competitors is a who’s-who of the sport, including legends like the late 16-time world champion, Jim Shoulders, who won more buckles than anyone else at the historic rodeo.

“Cheyenne used to be a happening,” recalled the ProRodeo Hall of Famer in a 2005 telephone conversation two years before he passed away. “It was one-of-a-kind when I got there (in the 1940s). The town was strictly rodeo. It was Frontier Days all that week and the week before.”

Legends aren’t the only ones who appreciate Cheyenne. The famous venue is an equal opportunity provider of life-changing moments, a fact 24-year-old bareback rider Casey Colletti experienced firsthand in 2011. The Pueblo, Colo., cowboy strung together three solid rides – including the best one of his career – to win the prestigious CFD buckle and pocket more than $18,000 in the process. Like Shoulders before him, Colletti will always remember winning Cheyenne … as soon as it sinks in.

“It still doesn’t seem like it has happened yet,” said Colletti a few days later about his winning ride of 89 points in the final round. “It was awesome, because it was the highest marked bareback ride I’ve ever had in my life (and) that was a pretty cool place to do it. I had my family there to watch it and there were a lot of my friends and buddies there that are bareback riders that got to watch it, too. It was a pretty cool feeling.”

Asked regarding his experience in the arena, Colletti’s memory was fresh.

“Oh, it was pretty intense,” he said with enthusiasm. “That horse kind of got me fired up at first, because he got to jumping around in the bucking chute. He definitely was a powerful bucker. It felt like one of the better bareback rides I had,” he revealed about his winning effort. “I didn’t know how many points it was going to be, but I felt like it went pretty good.”

Colletti’s unexpected victory had everyone buzzing at Cheyenne.

“It was exciting to have a home state guy, Casey Colletti from Colorado – right there in Pueblo, Colo., where we’re from – win the bareback riding.” said Kirsten Vold of Vold Rodeo Company, the highly regarded contractor that has supplied stock to CFD for the last 36 years. “He did a great job and that’s always exciting.”

Another person excited at 2011’s outcome was veteran competitor K.C. Jones of Burlington, Wyo. The home state cowboy has vied for the coveted All Around title in Cheyenne since 1991 and finally achieved his goal this year by earning almost $11,000 in team roping, tie-down roping and steer roping.

“It’s my big rodeo,” said Jones a few days after the rodeo’s completion. “I’ve won the All Around (title) at a lot of rodeos … gosh, I don’t know how many All Around buckles that I’ve won, but this is the first time I was able to win Cheyenne’s All Around buckle.”

Asked about the feeling of competing inside the huge arena in front of massive crowds, Jones answered with enthusiasm.

“Oh, it’s a rush,” he said in reply. “It’s just a great rodeo. The long score makes you have to show up with a good horse,” he described of the unique Cheyenne rules where each steer and calf are bigger and get a longer head start. As a result, the times are longer and the speed required on horseback to catch the animals is impressive.

“We just don’t have that many long scores anymore, so it’s great to go to a rodeo where they have a long score like that,” Jones continued. “When you spend your life trying to learn these cowboy skills, it’s nice to go to a place where they test them.”

Another surprise buckle winner came in the barrel racing event, where Elbert, Colo., cowgirl Kim Schulze bested a world-class field with a trio of fast times.

“To place in all three rounds is pretty amazing here,” said Schulze in an interview with CFD personnel. Schulze pocketed about $13,000 aboard a horse she received seven years ago from four-time world champ Kristie Peterson, who was a neighbor at the time. “I got some very good wisdom from Kristie Peterson, who told me to try to make my run for my horse and not worry about anyone else.”

Stories and history are made every year in Cheyenne, a venue unlike any other in the sport. Asked to compare the feeling of CFD to other rodeos, Kirsten Vold acknowledged the giant venue’s unique atmosphere.

“It’s really not fair to compare Cheyenne to other rodeos, because there are just so many things that are different there,” Vold said from experience. “They are kind of their own entity. They kind of re-write the rules and re-write the book. To be involved with anything of that magnitude and that large is always a great honor. We have over 5,000 volunteers in a town that has a population of 50,000,” Vold added about the community’s passion for their rodeo. ” To be a part of anything that big is great and … we’re very proud to be associated with a rodeo that size.”

Cheyenne’s importance to rodeo careers might best be understood from the mouths of 2011’s winning competitors.

“It’s Cheyenne,” said Colletti with laughter when discussing how it felt to earn the prestigious buckle. “I read something (winning bull rider) Shane Proctor wrote the other day. He said, ‘it’s got to be cool … they write songs about it.’ He’s right,” summed up the happy Coloradoan. “It’s hard to even imagine.”

No sport represents the West like the sport of rodeo, and no city represents rodeo like Cheyenne, Wyo. Since its first six-hour performance 115 years ago, cowboys have circled Cheyenne Frontier Days (CFD) on their calendars in bold ink. The list of past and present competitors is a who’s-who of the sport, including legends like the late 16-time world champion, Jim Shoulders, who won more buckles than anyone else at the historic rodeo.

“Cheyenne used to be a happening,” recalled the ProRodeo Hall of Famer in a 2005 telephone conversation two years before he passed away. “It was one-of-a-kind when I got there (in the 1940s). The town was strictly rodeo. It was Frontier Days all that week and the week before.”

Legends aren’t the only ones who appreciate Cheyenne. The famous venue is an equal opportunity provider of life-changing moments, a fact 24-year-old bareback rider Casey Colletti experienced firsthand in 2011. The Pueblo, Colo., cowboy strung together three solid rides – including the best one of his career – to win the prestigious CFD buckle and pocket more than $18,000 in the process. Like Shoulders before him, Colletti will always remember winning Cheyenne … as soon as it sinks in.

“It still doesn’t seem like it has happened yet,” said Colletti a few days later about his winning ride of 89 points in the final round. “It was awesome, because it was the highest marked bareback ride I’ve ever had in my life (and) that was a pretty cool place to do it. I had my family there to watch it and there were a lot of my friends and buddies there that are bareback riders that got to watch it, too. It was a pretty cool feeling.”

Asked regarding his experience in the arena, Colletti’s memory was fresh.

“Oh, it was pretty intense,” he said with enthusiasm. “That horse kind of got me fired up at first, because he got to jumping around in the bucking chute. He definitely was a powerful bucker. It felt like one of the better bareback rides I had,” he revealed about his winning effort. “I didn’t know how many points it was going to be, but I felt like it went pretty good.”

Colletti’s unexpected victory had everyone buzzing at Cheyenne.

“It was exciting to have a home state guy, Casey Colletti from Colorado – right there in Pueblo, Colo., where we’re from – win the bareback riding.” said Kirsten Vold of Vold Rodeo Company, the highly regarded contractor that has supplied stock to CFD for the last 36 years. “He did a great job and that’s always exciting.”

Another person excited at 2011’s outcome was veteran competitor K.C. Jones of Burlington, Wyo. The home state cowboy has vied for the coveted All Around title in Cheyenne since 1991 and finally achieved his goal this year by earning almost $11,000 in team roping, tie-down roping and steer roping.

“It’s my big rodeo,” said Jones a few days after the rodeo’s completion. “I’ve won the All Around (title) at a lot of rodeos … gosh, I don’t know how many All Around buckles that I’ve won, but this is the first time I was able to win Cheyenne’s All Around buckle.”

Asked about the feeling of competing inside the huge arena in front of massive crowds, Jones answered with enthusiasm.

“Oh, it’s a rush,” he said in reply. “It’s just a great rodeo. The long score makes you have to show up with a good horse,” he described of the unique Cheyenne rules where each steer and calf are bigger and get a longer head start. As a result, the times are longer and the speed required on horseback to catch the animals is impressive.

“We just don’t have that many long scores anymore, so it’s great to go to a rodeo where they have a long score like that,” Jones continued. “When you spend your life trying to learn these cowboy skills, it’s nice to go to a place where they test them.”

Another surprise buckle winner came in the barrel racing event, where Elbert, Colo., cowgirl Kim Schulze bested a world-class field with a trio of fast times.

“To place in all three rounds is pretty amazing here,” said Schulze in an interview with CFD personnel. Schulze pocketed about $13,000 aboard a horse she received seven years ago from four-time world champ Kristie Peterson, who was a neighbor at the time. “I got some very good wisdom from Kristie Peterson, who told me to try to make my run for my horse and not worry about anyone else.”

Stories and history are made every year in Cheyenne, a venue unlike any other in the sport. Asked to compare the feeling of CFD to other rodeos, Kirsten Vold acknowledged the giant venue’s unique atmosphere.

“It’s really not fair to compare Cheyenne to other rodeos, because there are just so many things that are different there,” Vold said from experience. “They are kind of their own entity. They kind of re-write the rules and re-write the book. To be involved with anything of that magnitude and that large is always a great honor. We have over 5,000 volunteers in a town that has a population of 50,000,” Vold added about the community’s passion for their rodeo. ” To be a part of anything that big is great and … we’re very proud to be associated with a rodeo that size.”

Cheyenne’s importance to rodeo careers might best be understood from the mouths of 2011’s winning competitors.

“It’s Cheyenne,” said Colletti with laughter when discussing how it felt to earn the prestigious buckle. “I read something (winning bull rider) Shane Proctor wrote the other day. He said, ‘it’s got to be cool … they write songs about it.’ He’s right,” summed up the happy Coloradoan. “It’s hard to even imagine.”

No sport represents the West like the sport of rodeo, and no city represents rodeo like Cheyenne, Wyo. Since its first six-hour performance 115 years ago, cowboys have circled Cheyenne Frontier Days (CFD) on their calendars in bold ink. The list of past and present competitors is a who’s-who of the sport, including legends like the late 16-time world champion, Jim Shoulders, who won more buckles than anyone else at the historic rodeo.

“Cheyenne used to be a happening,” recalled the ProRodeo Hall of Famer in a 2005 telephone conversation two years before he passed away. “It was one-of-a-kind when I got there (in the 1940s). The town was strictly rodeo. It was Frontier Days all that week and the week before.”

Legends aren’t the only ones who appreciate Cheyenne. The famous venue is an equal opportunity provider of life-changing moments, a fact 24-year-old bareback rider Casey Colletti experienced firsthand in 2011. The Pueblo, Colo., cowboy strung together three solid rides – including the best one of his career – to win the prestigious CFD buckle and pocket more than $18,000 in the process. Like Shoulders before him, Colletti will always remember winning Cheyenne … as soon as it sinks in.

“It still doesn’t seem like it has happened yet,” said Colletti a few days later about his winning ride of 89 points in the final round. “It was awesome, because it was the highest marked bareback ride I’ve ever had in my life (and) that was a pretty cool place to do it. I had my family there to watch it and there were a lot of my friends and buddies there that are bareback riders that got to watch it, too. It was a pretty cool feeling.”

Asked regarding his experience in the arena, Colletti’s memory was fresh.

“Oh, it was pretty intense,” he said with enthusiasm. “That horse kind of got me fired up at first, because he got to jumping around in the bucking chute. He definitely was a powerful bucker. It felt like one of the better bareback rides I had,” he revealed about his winning effort. “I didn’t know how many points it was going to be, but I felt like it went pretty good.”

Colletti’s unexpected victory had everyone buzzing at Cheyenne.

“It was exciting to have a home state guy, Casey Colletti from Colorado – right there in Pueblo, Colo., where we’re from – win the bareback riding.” said Kirsten Vold of Vold Rodeo Company, the highly regarded contractor that has supplied stock to CFD for the last 36 years. “He did a great job and that’s always exciting.”

Another person excited at 2011’s outcome was veteran competitor K.C. Jones of Burlington, Wyo. The home state cowboy has vied for the coveted All Around title in Cheyenne since 1991 and finally achieved his goal this year by earning almost $11,000 in team roping, tie-down roping and steer roping.

“It’s my big rodeo,” said Jones a few days after the rodeo’s completion. “I’ve won the All Around (title) at a lot of rodeos … gosh, I don’t know how many All Around buckles that I’ve won, but this is the first time I was able to win Cheyenne’s All Around buckle.”

Asked about the feeling of competing inside the huge arena in front of massive crowds, Jones answered with enthusiasm.

“Oh, it’s a rush,” he said in reply. “It’s just a great rodeo. The long score makes you have to show up with a good horse,” he described of the unique Cheyenne rules where each steer and calf are bigger and get a longer head start. As a result, the times are longer and the speed required on horseback to catch the animals is impressive.

“We just don’t have that many long scores anymore, so it’s great to go to a rodeo where they have a long score like that,” Jones continued. “When you spend your life trying to learn these cowboy skills, it’s nice to go to a place where they test them.”

Another surprise buckle winner came in the barrel racing event, where Elbert, Colo., cowgirl Kim Schulze bested a world-class field with a trio of fast times.

“To place in all three rounds is pretty amazing here,” said Schulze in an interview with CFD personnel. Schulze pocketed about $13,000 aboard a horse she received seven years ago from four-time world champ Kristie Peterson, who was a neighbor at the time. “I got some very good wisdom from Kristie Peterson, who told me to try to make my run for my horse and not worry about anyone else.”

Stories and history are made every year in Cheyenne, a venue unlike any other in the sport. Asked to compare the feeling of CFD to other rodeos, Kirsten Vold acknowledged the giant venue’s unique atmosphere.

“It’s really not fair to compare Cheyenne to other rodeos, because there are just so many things that are different there,” Vold said from experience. “They are kind of their own entity. They kind of re-write the rules and re-write the book. To be involved with anything of that magnitude and that large is always a great honor. We have over 5,000 volunteers in a town that has a population of 50,000,” Vold added about the community’s passion for their rodeo. ” To be a part of anything that big is great and … we’re very proud to be associated with a rodeo that size.”

Cheyenne’s importance to rodeo careers might best be understood from the mouths of 2011’s winning competitors.

“It’s Cheyenne,” said Colletti with laughter when discussing how it felt to earn the prestigious buckle. “I read something (winning bull rider) Shane Proctor wrote the other day. He said, ‘it’s got to be cool … they write songs about it.’ He’s right,” summed up the happy Coloradoan. “It’s hard to even imagine.”

No sport represents the West like the sport of rodeo, and no city represents rodeo like Cheyenne, Wyo. Since its first six-hour performance 115 years ago, cowboys have circled Cheyenne Frontier Days (CFD) on their calendars in bold ink. The list of past and present competitors is a who’s-who of the sport, including legends like the late 16-time world champion, Jim Shoulders, who won more buckles than anyone else at the historic rodeo.

“Cheyenne used to be a happening,” recalled the ProRodeo Hall of Famer in a 2005 telephone conversation two years before he passed away. “It was one-of-a-kind when I got there (in the 1940s). The town was strictly rodeo. It was Frontier Days all that week and the week before.”

Legends aren’t the only ones who appreciate Cheyenne. The famous venue is an equal opportunity provider of life-changing moments, a fact 24-year-old bareback rider Casey Colletti experienced firsthand in 2011. The Pueblo, Colo., cowboy strung together three solid rides – including the best one of his career – to win the prestigious CFD buckle and pocket more than $18,000 in the process. Like Shoulders before him, Colletti will always remember winning Cheyenne … as soon as it sinks in.

“It still doesn’t seem like it has happened yet,” said Colletti a few days later about his winning ride of 89 points in the final round. “It was awesome, because it was the highest marked bareback ride I’ve ever had in my life (and) that was a pretty cool place to do it. I had my family there to watch it and there were a lot of my friends and buddies there that are bareback riders that got to watch it, too. It was a pretty cool feeling.”

Asked regarding his experience in the arena, Colletti’s memory was fresh.

“Oh, it was pretty intense,” he said with enthusiasm. “That horse kind of got me fired up at first, because he got to jumping around in the bucking chute. He definitely was a powerful bucker. It felt like one of the better bareback rides I had,” he revealed about his winning effort. “I didn’t know how many points it was going to be, but I felt like it went pretty good.”

Colletti’s unexpected victory had everyone buzzing at Cheyenne.

“It was exciting to have a home state guy, Casey Colletti from Colorado – right there in Pueblo, Colo., where we’re from – win the bareback riding.” said Kirsten Vold of Vold Rodeo Company, the highly regarded contractor that has supplied stock to CFD for the last 36 years. “He did a great job and that’s always exciting.”

Another person excited at 2011’s outcome was veteran competitor K.C. Jones of Burlington, Wyo. The home state cowboy has vied for the coveted All Around title in Cheyenne since 1991 and finally achieved his goal this year by earning almost $11,000 in team roping, tie-down roping and steer roping.

“It’s my big rodeo,” said Jones a few days after the rodeo’s completion. “I’ve won the All Around (title) at a lot of rodeos … gosh, I don’t know how many All Around buckles that I’ve won, but this is the first time I was able to win Cheyenne’s All Around buckle.”

Asked about the feeling of competing inside the huge arena in front of massive crowds, Jones answered with enthusiasm.

“Oh, it’s a rush,” he said in reply. “It’s just a great rodeo. The long score makes you have to show up with a good horse,” he described of the unique Cheyenne rules where each steer and calf are bigger and get a longer head start. As a result, the times are longer and the speed required on horseback to catch the animals is impressive.

“We just don’t have that many long scores anymore, so it’s great to go to a rodeo where they have a long score like that,” Jones continued. “When you spend your life trying to learn these cowboy skills, it’s nice to go to a place where they test them.”

Another surprise buckle winner came in the barrel racing event, where Elbert, Colo., cowgirl Kim Schulze bested a world-class field with a trio of fast times.

“To place in all three rounds is pretty amazing here,” said Schulze in an interview with CFD personnel. Schulze pocketed about $13,000 aboard a horse she received seven years ago from four-time world champ Kristie Peterson, who was a neighbor at the time. “I got some very good wisdom from Kristie Peterson, who told me to try to make my run for my horse and not worry about anyone else.”

Stories and history are made every year in Cheyenne, a venue unlike any other in the sport. Asked to compare the feeling of CFD to other rodeos, Kirsten Vold acknowledged the giant venue’s unique atmosphere.

“It’s really not fair to compare Cheyenne to other rodeos, because there are just so many things that are different there,” Vold said from experience. “They are kind of their own entity. They kind of re-write the rules and re-write the book. To be involved with anything of that magnitude and that large is always a great honor. We have over 5,000 volunteers in a town that has a population of 50,000,” Vold added about the community’s passion for their rodeo. ” To be a part of anything that big is great and … we’re very proud to be associated with a rodeo that size.”

Cheyenne’s importance to rodeo careers might best be understood from the mouths of 2011’s winning competitors.

“It’s Cheyenne,” said Colletti with laughter when discussing how it felt to earn the prestigious buckle. “I read something (winning bull rider) Shane Proctor wrote the other day. He said, ‘it’s got to be cool … they write songs about it.’ He’s right,” summed up the happy Coloradoan. “It’s hard to even imagine.”

No sport represents the West like the sport of rodeo, and no city represents rodeo like Cheyenne, Wyo. Since its first six-hour performance 115 years ago, cowboys have circled Cheyenne Frontier Days (CFD) on their calendars in bold ink. The list of past and present competitors is a who’s-who of the sport, including legends like the late 16-time world champion, Jim Shoulders, who won more buckles than anyone else at the historic rodeo.

“Cheyenne used to be a happening,” recalled the ProRodeo Hall of Famer in a 2005 telephone conversation two years before he passed away. “It was one-of-a-kind when I got there (in the 1940s). The town was strictly rodeo. It was Frontier Days all that week and the week before.”

Legends aren’t the only ones who appreciate Cheyenne. The famous venue is an equal opportunity provider of life-changing moments, a fact 24-year-old bareback rider Casey Colletti experienced firsthand in 2011. The Pueblo, Colo., cowboy strung together three solid rides – including the best one of his career – to win the prestigious CFD buckle and pocket more than $18,000 in the process. Like Shoulders before him, Colletti will always remember winning Cheyenne … as soon as it sinks in.

“It still doesn’t seem like it has happened yet,” said Colletti a few days later about his winning ride of 89 points in the final round. “It was awesome, because it was the highest marked bareback ride I’ve ever had in my life (and) that was a pretty cool place to do it. I had my family there to watch it and there were a lot of my friends and buddies there that are bareback riders that got to watch it, too. It was a pretty cool feeling.”

Asked regarding his experience in the arena, Colletti’s memory was fresh.

“Oh, it was pretty intense,” he said with enthusiasm. “That horse kind of got me fired up at first, because he got to jumping around in the bucking chute. He definitely was a powerful bucker. It felt like one of the better bareback rides I had,” he revealed about his winning effort. “I didn’t know how many points it was going to be, but I felt like it went pretty good.”

Colletti’s unexpected victory had everyone buzzing at Cheyenne.

“It was exciting to have a home state guy, Casey Colletti from Colorado – right there in Pueblo, Colo., where we’re from – win the bareback riding.” said Kirsten Vold of Vold Rodeo Company, the highly regarded contractor that has supplied stock to CFD for the last 36 years. “He did a great job and that’s always exciting.”

Another person excited at 2011’s outcome was veteran competitor K.C. Jones of Burlington, Wyo. The home state cowboy has vied for the coveted All Around title in Cheyenne since 1991 and finally achieved his goal this year by earning almost $11,000 in team roping, tie-down roping and steer roping.

“It’s my big rodeo,” said Jones a few days after the rodeo’s completion. “I’ve won the All Around (title) at a lot of rodeos … gosh, I don’t know how many All Around buckles that I’ve won, but this is the first time I was able to win Cheyenne’s All Around buckle.”

Asked about the feeling of competing inside the huge arena in front of massive crowds, Jones answered with enthusiasm.

“Oh, it’s a rush,” he said in reply. “It’s just a great rodeo. The long score makes you have to show up with a good horse,” he described of the unique Cheyenne rules where each steer and calf are bigger and get a longer head start. As a result, the times are longer and the speed required on horseback to catch the animals is impressive.

“We just don’t have that many long scores anymore, so it’s great to go to a rodeo where they have a long score like that,” Jones continued. “When you spend your life trying to learn these cowboy skills, it’s nice to go to a place where they test them.”

Another surprise buckle winner came in the barrel racing event, where Elbert, Colo., cowgirl Kim Schulze bested a world-class field with a trio of fast times.

“To place in all three rounds is pretty amazing here,” said Schulze in an interview with CFD personnel. Schulze pocketed about $13,000 aboard a horse she received seven years ago from four-time world champ Kristie Peterson, who was a neighbor at the time. “I got some very good wisdom from Kristie Peterson, who told me to try to make my run for my horse and not worry about anyone else.”

Stories and history are made every year in Cheyenne, a venue unlike any other in the sport. Asked to compare the feeling of CFD to other rodeos, Kirsten Vold acknowledged the giant venue’s unique atmosphere.

“It’s really not fair to compare Cheyenne to other rodeos, because there are just so many things that are different there,” Vold said from experience. “They are kind of their own entity. They kind of re-write the rules and re-write the book. To be involved with anything of that magnitude and that large is always a great honor. We have over 5,000 volunteers in a town that has a population of 50,000,” Vold added about the community’s passion for their rodeo. ” To be a part of anything that big is great and … we’re very proud to be associated with a rodeo that size.”

Cheyenne’s importance to rodeo careers might best be understood from the mouths of 2011’s winning competitors.

“It’s Cheyenne,” said Colletti with laughter when discussing how it felt to earn the prestigious buckle. “I read something (winning bull rider) Shane Proctor wrote the other day. He said, ‘it’s got to be cool … they write songs about it.’ He’s right,” summed up the happy Coloradoan. “It’s hard to even imagine.”

No sport represents the West like the sport of rodeo, and no city represents rodeo like Cheyenne, Wyo. Since its first six-hour performance 115 years ago, cowboys have circled Cheyenne Frontier Days (CFD) on their calendars in bold ink. The list of past and present competitors is a who’s-who of the sport, including legends like the late 16-time world champion, Jim Shoulders, who won more buckles than anyone else at the historic rodeo.

“Cheyenne used to be a happening,” recalled the ProRodeo Hall of Famer in a 2005 telephone conversation two years before he passed away. “It was one-of-a-kind when I got there (in the 1940s). The town was strictly rodeo. It was Frontier Days all that week and the week before.”

Legends aren’t the only ones who appreciate Cheyenne. The famous venue is an equal opportunity provider of life-changing moments, a fact 24-year-old bareback rider Casey Colletti experienced firsthand in 2011. The Pueblo, Colo., cowboy strung together three solid rides – including the best one of his career – to win the prestigious CFD buckle and pocket more than $18,000 in the process. Like Shoulders before him, Colletti will always remember winning Cheyenne … as soon as it sinks in.

“It still doesn’t seem like it has happened yet,” said Colletti a few days later about his winning ride of 89 points in the final round. “It was awesome, because it was the highest marked bareback ride I’ve ever had in my life (and) that was a pretty cool place to do it. I had my family there to watch it and there were a lot of my friends and buddies there that are bareback riders that got to watch it, too. It was a pretty cool feeling.”

Asked regarding his experience in the arena, Colletti’s memory was fresh.

“Oh, it was pretty intense,” he said with enthusiasm. “That horse kind of got me fired up at first, because he got to jumping around in the bucking chute. He definitely was a powerful bucker. It felt like one of the better bareback rides I had,” he revealed about his winning effort. “I didn’t know how many points it was going to be, but I felt like it went pretty good.”

Colletti’s unexpected victory had everyone buzzing at Cheyenne.

“It was exciting to have a home state guy, Casey Colletti from Colorado – right there in Pueblo, Colo., where we’re from – win the bareback riding.” said Kirsten Vold of Vold Rodeo Company, the highly regarded contractor that has supplied stock to CFD for the last 36 years. “He did a great job and that’s always exciting.”

Another person excited at 2011’s outcome was veteran competitor K.C. Jones of Burlington, Wyo. The home state cowboy has vied for the coveted All Around title in Cheyenne since 1991 and finally achieved his goal this year by earning almost $11,000 in team roping, tie-down roping and steer roping.

“It’s my big rodeo,” said Jones a few days after the rodeo’s completion. “I’ve won the All Around (title) at a lot of rodeos … gosh, I don’t know how many All Around buckles that I’ve won, but this is the first time I was able to win Cheyenne’s All Around buckle.”

Asked about the feeling of competing inside the huge arena in front of massive crowds, Jones answered with enthusiasm.

“Oh, it’s a rush,” he said in reply. “It’s just a great rodeo. The long score makes you have to show up with a good horse,” he described of the unique Cheyenne rules where each steer and calf are bigger and get a longer head start. As a result, the times are longer and the speed required on horseback to catch the animals is impressive.

“We just don’t have that many long scores anymore, so it’s great to go to a rodeo where they have a long score like that,” Jones continued. “When you spend your life trying to learn these cowboy skills, it’s nice to go to a place where they test them.”

Another surprise buckle winner came in the barrel racing event, where Elbert, Colo., cowgirl Kim Schulze bested a world-class field with a trio of fast times.

“To place in all three rounds is pretty amazing here,” said Schulze in an interview with CFD personnel. Schulze pocketed about $13,000 aboard a horse she received seven years ago from four-time world champ Kristie Peterson, who was a neighbor at the time. “I got some very good wisdom from Kristie Peterson, who told me to try to make my run for my horse and not worry about anyone else.”

Stories and history are made every year in Cheyenne, a venue unlike any other in the sport. Asked to compare the feeling of CFD to other rodeos, Kirsten Vold acknowledged the giant venue’s unique atmosphere.

“It’s really not fair to compare Cheyenne to other rodeos, because there are just so many things that are different there,” Vold said from experience. “They are kind of their own entity. They kind of re-write the rules and re-write the book. To be involved with anything of that magnitude and that large is always a great honor. We have over 5,000 volunteers in a town that has a population of 50,000,” Vold added about the community’s passion for their rodeo. ” To be a part of anything that big is great and … we’re very proud to be associated with a rodeo that size.”

Cheyenne’s importance to rodeo careers might best be understood from the mouths of 2011’s winning competitors.

“It’s Cheyenne,” said Colletti with laughter when discussing how it felt to earn the prestigious buckle. “I read something (winning bull rider) Shane Proctor wrote the other day. He said, ‘it’s got to be cool … they write songs about it.’ He’s right,” summed up the happy Coloradoan. “It’s hard to even imagine.”