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2009 COLORADO FARM SHOW SCHEDULE

2009 AG SPOTLIGHT

Event Center Room A

10-11a.m.

The Farm Bill: Implications for Colorado Agriculture

Dawn Thilmany McFadden, Professor & Extension Economist, CSU

There are several titles to the Farm Bill, all of which impact parts of the diverse Colorado agricultural economy. This presentation will briefly summarize some of the major titles and new programs introduced in the Farm Bill with particular focus on how it is expected to influence the decisions and choices of Colorado’s farms and ranches.

11a.m.-12p.m.

Legislative View of the Farm Bill

Renny Fagan, State Director, Office of Senator Ken Salazar

Renny Fagen will discuss the Farm Bill from a legislative prospective. He will outline the changes from the past Farm Bill and discuss the future direction of Farm Bill legislation. This is a time to ask about proposed directions of future Farm Bills. This will be a great opportunity to learn about how Congress looks at future trends and policies that may affect risk management ideas of farm operations in the future.

12-1p.m.

LUNCH BREAK

1:15-2p.m.

Alternative Energy

Raphael Shay, Community Sustainability Manager, iCAST

Raphael will present information on Bio-diesel and vegetable oil as alternative fuels options. iCAST has worked to produce the Seeds to Diesel Program that demonstrates a small scale working system that produces bio-diesel from oil seed crops. iCAST works with many forms of alternative energy formats including: bio-diesel, solar, wind, and methane. This presentation will give a good overview of alternative energy sources for farmers.

2-3 p.m.

Wind Energy for the Farmstead

Tony Frank, Director of Renewable Development, Rocky Mountain Farmers Union

Tony will present information on capturing wind energy to power the farmstead. He will also discuss options that farmers have to reduce costs and power the farmstead. In addition, this presentation will provide an overview of small wind technology ranging from 1 KW to 100 KW in size. Information provided will include resources for assessment, economic incentives, manufacturers, and installers.

2009 BEEF DAY

Event Center Room C

10-10:10 a.m. Welcome and Opening Comments Mike Jarosz, Weld County Livestock Agent, CSU Extension

Feed Efficiency:

10:15-11 a.m. The Big Picture of Feed Efficiency (Importance, Trends, and Future Direction).

Dr. Denny Crews, Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences

Dr. Crews will discuss how the beef industry, in the past, has focused on selecting for output traits such as growth ” but little attention has been placed on inputs such as intake and efficiency. Now with high feed costs the industry is driven to improve efficiency and is measuring feed intake the answer to improvement? Dr. Crews will define Residual Feed Intake (RFI) as a selection trait for efficiency describing the methods to measure and any implications of selecting for RFI. He will point out how to accurately select for efficiency and make strides the industry needs to test numerous animals and implement other tools such as genetic markers.

11:05-11:50 a.m.

Fitting Feed Efficiency into the Beef Profit Equation.

Dr. Gordon Carstens, Associate Professor, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M University

Dr. Carstens will characterize the use of Residual Feed Intake (RFI) in growing and finishing cattle and describe why RFI is a better efficiency trait than feed to gain ratio. He will comment on if RFI is a “real” efficiency measure that can be linked to biological processes in the animal. Dr. Carstens will discuss if RFI selection can improve profitability to the cow/calf producer and if selecting for RFI will negatively affect reproduction, growth, carcass performance, or meat quality. He will wrap-up with discussing if other traits such as eating behavior (meals/day, etc.) are predictive of RFI and ultimately efficiency.

LUNCH BREAK 11:55 – 12:55 p.m.

Marketing:

1-1:45 p.m. Receiving Rewards for Paperwork

Kevin Miller, Herd Manager, Croissant Red Angus

Kevin will address how beef producers can reap financial rewards from simple paperwork. He will give example of what they do on their operation following cattle from birth through harvest and every step along the way. Plus, Kevin will discuss how Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) is being implemented and ways producers can capitalize on this initiative

1:50-2:25 p.m. Starting a Producer Calf Marketing COOP

Dean Oatman, Las Animas County Agriculture, Livestock, & 4-H Agent, CSU Extension

In his area, Dean is organizing a group of cow/calf producers bringing their calves together to market in larger groups of like calves to improve marketability and potential profitability. Dean will discuss their approach and the ideas that they are using for the marketing group to be successful.

2:30-3 p.m. Producer experience of a Calf Marketing COOP

Larry Hoozee, Cow/calf Operation Owner – Stoneham, Colo.

Larry will discuss, from a producer perspective, his experience being involved with a calf marketing group. He will address why the group formed, what went well, what challenges the group faced, and if he believes he received a premium for his calves due to the group.

2009 EQUINE DAY

Grasslands/Pawnee Buttes Room

8:30-10 a.m.

Preparing for the Use of Frozen Stallion Semen

Trace Linnebur, Owner, Genetic Innovations, LLC – Deer Trail, CO

Trace will conduct a discussion/laboratory session in which several topics will be addressed including an overview of the semen freezing process, normal and abnormal sperm cell motility and morphology, and the importance of good semen quality. The proper way to receive a frozen semen shipment will be presented, as well as techniques for thawing and preparing semen for AI use.

10 a.m.-Noon

Angular Limb Deformities and Developmental Tendon Disorders

Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO

It is not unusual for a foal to be born with an angular limb deformity (crooked legs) or a developmental tendon disorder (knuckling forward or contracted tendons). Some of these deformities will self correct, while some will not. Dr. Jergens will discuss all of these conditions. She will explain which conditions correct, the conditions that won’t correct, and when to take action! She will discuss conservative and surgical treatments of these problems.

12-1 p.m. LUNCH BREAK

1-4 p.m.

Tendon Injuries and Their Management

Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO

Tendon and ligament injuries are a significant cause of lameness in the equine athlete. Racing, jumping, endurance, or barrel racing predispose horses to these types of injuries. Horses of all breeds and uses, including the backyard or light use horse, can also injure these structures. Dr. Jergens will discuss tendon and ligament injuries, their diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. She will demonstrate effective rehabilitation techniques in a hands-on lab following the lecture.

Thursday

January 29

PARTNERS IN AG

Event Center Room A

9 -10a.m.

Using Soil Testing to Evaluate Soil Quality

Jim Self, Director, CSU Soil, Water, and Plant Testing Laboratory – Ft. Collins, CO

The use of soil testing is an effective way to determine the productivity and quality of the soil. Although a soil’s appearance can give an idea of its structure or texture, it cannot give a true indication of the nutrient content, salt level, or metal concentrations in the soil. A soil test provides the information to make informed decisions on how to manage the soil for enhanced productivity, make better use of resources, and obtain greater financial returns.

10:30-11:30a.m.

Grass, Water, and Energy – How Do They Fit?

Don Hijar, Owner/Manager, Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc.-Greeley, CO

Everyone knows there’s a lot of work to be done when you start to grow any crop; plowing, disc work, and adding chemicals are a few of the expenses a farmer experiences. It also takes a large amount of energy and time to get a good crop established from year to year. But, if you plant grass rather than a conventional crop, your energy expenditure establishing a pasture will be cut down tremendously. As costs continue to rise and access to water gets tighter, planting the correct kind of grass can reduce your materials, energy, and irrigation expenses overall. Don will discuss the benefits of growing native grasses in a different manner than most conventional methods.

11:30-1:00 LUNCH BREAK

1-2p.m.

Organic Fertilizers and Soil Amendments

Jim Holland, Owner, Unlimited Expectations-Denver, CO

Organic fertilizers and soil amendments to be used are usually dependent on the information determined by the area soil test. The soil should always be tested prior to using any materials to prevent worsening the soil. After the determination has been made, it will be necessary to decide what the purpose of the area will be used for because any growing material is considered to be a crop. http://www.unlimited_expectations.com

HAY AND FORAGE

Exhibition Room

10-11a.m.

National Alfalfa and Forage Alliance Update

Rod Christensen, Executive Secretary, National Alfalfa & Forage Alliance – Kennewick, WA

Rod will be giving an update on NAFA activities and will explain how the organization operates and what the organization’s goals are. He will also be reporting on the current status of the re-deregulation efforts in the biotechnology industry. In addition, Rod will also share some of NAFA’s efforts in trying to bring various parties together to develop co-existence strategies.

11a.m. to Noon

Carbon Credits: A New Source for Farming Revenue

Lowell Messman, Aggregation Specialist, AgraGate Climate Credits Corporation – West Des Moines, IA

Farm and ranch operators interested in learning more about opportunities in the market for carbon credits from their hay and forage crops and other land should plan to attend this one hour presentation. Lowell will discuss how the emerging carbon credits market is a new revenue opportunity for farm and ranch operators. He will give participants an understanding of the sign-up process so they can enroll their credits and begin to generate an additional return from their investment in conservation practices. Eligible practices include no-till and strip-till cropping, new forage plantings, sustainably managed rangeland, and methane destruction from livestock manure lagoons.

12-1p.m. LUNCH BREAK

1-2p.m.

Strip-Tillage is Beyond a Tool-A Systems Approach to Better Soil Management

Michael Petersen, Precision Tillage Agronomist, Orthman Manufacturing Inc. – Lexington, NE

David Zimmerer, Sales Manager, Schlagel Manufacturing – Torrington, WY

Tillage work has been wrongly presented as a beginning to a destructive end. With soils that have undergone intense tillage for the past 90-100 years for row crop production, the advocates of the quality conservation tillage approach have given a one bullet approach to recovery – Direct Seeding only. Utilizing a residue management program, vertical tillage in a specific zone, calculated and targeted fertilization program within the same zone as the tillage, we are able to improve soil quality within 3 years that benefits a farmer’s management system to improve yields, better control of inputs, wiser use of the grower’s time, and resources. In this presentation we will cover the systems approach to strip-tillage, benefits to soil characteristics that have been measured, and discuss fertilization management techniques that are cutting edge for growers to consider.

SPANISH EDUCATION

Grassland/Pawnee Butte Room

10a.m.-12p.m.

Dairy Cow Well-Being: Identifying and Managing Cows at Risk of Becoming Downers

Dr. Noa Roman-Muniz, Extension Dairy Specialist/Assistant Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences-Ft. Collins, CO

In order to achieve our goal of assuring animal well-being and preventing cattle from becoming downers on the dairy farm, trailer or sale barn, we must become better observers and understand what animals are at risk of becoming non-ambulatory. The key is to identify animals at risk earlier on and deciding in a timely manner how to manage that animal. Should we treat the disease, cull, or euthanize on the farm? We will discuss the impact that management decisions could have on animal well-being, public safety, and public perception.

Bienestar de vacas lecheras: identificando y manejando vacas a riesgo de caerse

Para alcanzar la meta de asegurar el bienestar animal y prevenir que las vacas se caigan en la lecheria, durante el transporte o en la venta, necesitamos convertirnos en mejores observadores y entender que animales estan en riesgo de caerse y permanecer postrados. La clave es identificar a los animales en riesgo pronto y tomar una decision respecto a como manejarlos. ¿Debemos tratar la enfermedad, venderlos o administrar eutanasia en la lecheria? Discutiremos el impacto que las decisiones de manejo pueden tener en el bienestar animal, la salud publica y la percepcion del publico. v

2009 AG SPOTLIGHT

Event Center Room A

10-11a.m.

The Farm Bill: Implications for Colorado Agriculture

Dawn Thilmany McFadden, Professor & Extension Economist, CSU

There are several titles to the Farm Bill, all of which impact parts of the diverse Colorado agricultural economy. This presentation will briefly summarize some of the major titles and new programs introduced in the Farm Bill with particular focus on how it is expected to influence the decisions and choices of Colorado’s farms and ranches.

11a.m.-12p.m.

Legislative View of the Farm Bill

Renny Fagan, State Director, Office of Senator Ken Salazar

Renny Fagen will discuss the Farm Bill from a legislative prospective. He will outline the changes from the past Farm Bill and discuss the future direction of Farm Bill legislation. This is a time to ask about proposed directions of future Farm Bills. This will be a great opportunity to learn about how Congress looks at future trends and policies that may affect risk management ideas of farm operations in the future.

12-1p.m.

LUNCH BREAK

1:15-2p.m.

Alternative Energy

Raphael Shay, Community Sustainability Manager, iCAST

Raphael will present information on Bio-diesel and vegetable oil as alternative fuels options. iCAST has worked to produce the Seeds to Diesel Program that demonstrates a small scale working system that produces bio-diesel from oil seed crops. iCAST works with many forms of alternative energy formats including: bio-diesel, solar, wind, and methane. This presentation will give a good overview of alternative energy sources for farmers.

2-3 p.m.

Wind Energy for the Farmstead

Tony Frank, Director of Renewable Development, Rocky Mountain Farmers Union

Tony will present information on capturing wind energy to power the farmstead. He will also discuss options that farmers have to reduce costs and power the farmstead. In addition, this presentation will provide an overview of small wind technology ranging from 1 KW to 100 KW in size. Information provided will include resources for assessment, economic incentives, manufacturers, and installers.

2009 BEEF DAY

Event Center Room C

10-10:10 a.m. Welcome and Opening Comments Mike Jarosz, Weld County Livestock Agent, CSU Extension

Feed Efficiency:

10:15-11 a.m. The Big Picture of Feed Efficiency (Importance, Trends, and Future Direction).

Dr. Denny Crews, Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences

Dr. Crews will discuss how the beef industry, in the past, has focused on selecting for output traits such as growth ” but little attention has been placed on inputs such as intake and efficiency. Now with high feed costs the industry is driven to improve efficiency and is measuring feed intake the answer to improvement? Dr. Crews will define Residual Feed Intake (RFI) as a selection trait for efficiency describing the methods to measure and any implications of selecting for RFI. He will point out how to accurately select for efficiency and make strides the industry needs to test numerous animals and implement other tools such as genetic markers.

11:05-11:50 a.m.

Fitting Feed Efficiency into the Beef Profit Equation.

Dr. Gordon Carstens, Associate Professor, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M University

Dr. Carstens will characterize the use of Residual Feed Intake (RFI) in growing and finishing cattle and describe why RFI is a better efficiency trait than feed to gain ratio. He will comment on if RFI is a “real” efficiency measure that can be linked to biological processes in the animal. Dr. Carstens will discuss if RFI selection can improve profitability to the cow/calf producer and if selecting for RFI will negatively affect reproduction, growth, carcass performance, or meat quality. He will wrap-up with discussing if other traits such as eating behavior (meals/day, etc.) are predictive of RFI and ultimately efficiency.

LUNCH BREAK 11:55 – 12:55 p.m.

Marketing:

1-1:45 p.m. Receiving Rewards for Paperwork

Kevin Miller, Herd Manager, Croissant Red Angus

Kevin will address how beef producers can reap financial rewards from simple paperwork. He will give example of what they do on their operation following cattle from birth through harvest and every step along the way. Plus, Kevin will discuss how Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) is being implemented and ways producers can capitalize on this initiative

1:50-2:25 p.m. Starting a Producer Calf Marketing COOP

Dean Oatman, Las Animas County Agriculture, Livestock, & 4-H Agent, CSU Extension

In his area, Dean is organizing a group of cow/calf producers bringing their calves together to market in larger groups of like calves to improve marketability and potential profitability. Dean will discuss their approach and the ideas that they are using for the marketing group to be successful.

2:30-3 p.m. Producer experience of a Calf Marketing COOP

Larry Hoozee, Cow/calf Operation Owner – Stoneham, Colo.

Larry will discuss, from a producer perspective, his experience being involved with a calf marketing group. He will address why the group formed, what went well, what challenges the group faced, and if he believes he received a premium for his calves due to the group.

2009 EQUINE DAY

Grasslands/Pawnee Buttes Room

8:30-10 a.m.

Preparing for the Use of Frozen Stallion Semen

Trace Linnebur, Owner, Genetic Innovations, LLC – Deer Trail, CO

Trace will conduct a discussion/laboratory session in which several topics will be addressed including an overview of the semen freezing process, normal and abnormal sperm cell motility and morphology, and the importance of good semen quality. The proper way to receive a frozen semen shipment will be presented, as well as techniques for thawing and preparing semen for AI use.

10 a.m.-Noon

Angular Limb Deformities and Developmental Tendon Disorders

Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO

It is not unusual for a foal to be born with an angular limb deformity (crooked legs) or a developmental tendon disorder (knuckling forward or contracted tendons). Some of these deformities will self correct, while some will not. Dr. Jergens will discuss all of these conditions. She will explain which conditions correct, the conditions that won’t correct, and when to take action! She will discuss conservative and surgical treatments of these problems.

12-1 p.m. LUNCH BREAK

1-4 p.m.

Tendon Injuries and Their Management

Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO

Tendon and ligament injuries are a significant cause of lameness in the equine athlete. Racing, jumping, endurance, or barrel racing predispose horses to these types of injuries. Horses of all breeds and uses, including the backyard or light use horse, can also injure these structures. Dr. Jergens will discuss tendon and ligament injuries, their diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. She will demonstrate effective rehabilitation techniques in a hands-on lab following the lecture.

Thursday

January 29

PARTNERS IN AG

Event Center Room A

9 -10a.m.

Using Soil Testing to Evaluate Soil Quality

Jim Self, Director, CSU Soil, Water, and Plant Testing Laboratory – Ft. Collins, CO

The use of soil testing is an effective way to determine the productivity and quality of the soil. Although a soil’s appearance can give an idea of its structure or texture, it cannot give a true indication of the nutrient content, salt level, or metal concentrations in the soil. A soil test provides the information to make informed decisions on how to manage the soil for enhanced productivity, make better use of resources, and obtain greater financial returns.

10:30-11:30a.m.

Grass, Water, and Energy – How Do They Fit?

Don Hijar, Owner/Manager, Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc.-Greeley, CO

Everyone knows there’s a lot of work to be done when you start to grow any crop; plowing, disc work, and adding chemicals are a few of the expenses a farmer experiences. It also takes a large amount of energy and time to get a good crop established from year to year. But, if you plant grass rather than a conventional crop, your energy expenditure establishing a pasture will be cut down tremendously. As costs continue to rise and access to water gets tighter, planting the correct kind of grass can reduce your materials, energy, and irrigation expenses overall. Don will discuss the benefits of growing native grasses in a different manner than most conventional methods.

11:30-1:00 LUNCH BREAK

1-2p.m.

Organic Fertilizers and Soil Amendments

Jim Holland, Owner, Unlimited Expectations-Denver, CO

Organic fertilizers and soil amendments to be used are usually dependent on the information determined by the area soil test. The soil should always be tested prior to using any materials to prevent worsening the soil. After the determination has been made, it will be necessary to decide what the purpose of the area will be used for because any growing material is considered to be a crop. http://www.unlimited_expectations.com

HAY AND FORAGE

Exhibition Room

10-11a.m.

National Alfalfa and Forage Alliance Update

Rod Christensen, Executive Secretary, National Alfalfa & Forage Alliance – Kennewick, WA

Rod will be giving an update on NAFA activities and will explain how the organization operates and what the organization’s goals are. He will also be reporting on the current status of the re-deregulation efforts in the biotechnology industry. In addition, Rod will also share some of NAFA’s efforts in trying to bring various parties together to develop co-existence strategies.

11a.m. to Noon

Carbon Credits: A New Source for Farming Revenue

Lowell Messman, Aggregation Specialist, AgraGate Climate Credits Corporation – West Des Moines, IA

Farm and ranch operators interested in learning more about opportunities in the market for carbon credits from their hay and forage crops and other land should plan to attend this one hour presentation. Lowell will discuss how the emerging carbon credits market is a new revenue opportunity for farm and ranch operators. He will give participants an understanding of the sign-up process so they can enroll their credits and begin to generate an additional return from their investment in conservation practices. Eligible practices include no-till and strip-till cropping, new forage plantings, sustainably managed rangeland, and methane destruction from livestock manure lagoons.

12-1p.m. LUNCH BREAK

1-2p.m.

Strip-Tillage is Beyond a Tool-A Systems Approach to Better Soil Management

Michael Petersen, Precision Tillage Agronomist, Orthman Manufacturing Inc. – Lexington, NE

David Zimmerer, Sales Manager, Schlagel Manufacturing – Torrington, WY

Tillage work has been wrongly presented as a beginning to a destructive end. With soils that have undergone intense tillage for the past 90-100 years for row crop production, the advocates of the quality conservation tillage approach have given a one bullet approach to recovery – Direct Seeding only. Utilizing a residue management program, vertical tillage in a specific zone, calculated and targeted fertilization program within the same zone as the tillage, we are able to improve soil quality within 3 years that benefits a farmer’s management system to improve yields, better control of inputs, wiser use of the grower’s time, and resources. In this presentation we will cover the systems approach to strip-tillage, benefits to soil characteristics that have been measured, and discuss fertilization management techniques that are cutting edge for growers to consider.

SPANISH EDUCATION

Grassland/Pawnee Butte Room

10a.m.-12p.m.

Dairy Cow Well-Being: Identifying and Managing Cows at Risk of Becoming Downers

Dr. Noa Roman-Muniz, Extension Dairy Specialist/Assistant Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences-Ft. Collins, CO

In order to achieve our goal of assuring animal well-being and preventing cattle from becoming downers on the dairy farm, trailer or sale barn, we must become better observers and understand what animals are at risk of becoming non-ambulatory. The key is to identify animals at risk earlier on and deciding in a timely manner how to manage that animal. Should we treat the disease, cull, or euthanize on the farm? We will discuss the impact that management decisions could have on animal well-being, public safety, and public perception.

Bienestar de vacas lecheras: identificando y manejando vacas a riesgo de caerse

Para alcanzar la meta de asegurar el bienestar animal y prevenir que las vacas se caigan en la lecheria, durante el transporte o en la venta, necesitamos convertirnos en mejores observadores y entender que animales estan en riesgo de caerse y permanecer postrados. La clave es identificar a los animales en riesgo pronto y tomar una decision respecto a como manejarlos. ¿Debemos tratar la enfermedad, venderlos o administrar eutanasia en la lecheria? Discutiremos el impacto que las decisiones de manejo pueden tener en el bienestar animal, la salud publica y la percepcion del publico. v

2009 AG SPOTLIGHT

Event Center Room A

10-11a.m.

The Farm Bill: Implications for Colorado Agriculture

Dawn Thilmany McFadden, Professor & Extension Economist, CSU

There are several titles to the Farm Bill, all of which impact parts of the diverse Colorado agricultural economy. This presentation will briefly summarize some of the major titles and new programs introduced in the Farm Bill with particular focus on how it is expected to influence the decisions and choices of Colorado’s farms and ranches.

11a.m.-12p.m.

Legislative View of the Farm Bill

Renny Fagan, State Director, Office of Senator Ken Salazar

Renny Fagen will discuss the Farm Bill from a legislative prospective. He will outline the changes from the past Farm Bill and discuss the future direction of Farm Bill legislation. This is a time to ask about proposed directions of future Farm Bills. This will be a great opportunity to learn about how Congress looks at future trends and policies that may affect risk management ideas of farm operations in the future.

12-1p.m.

LUNCH BREAK

1:15-2p.m.

Alternative Energy

Raphael Shay, Community Sustainability Manager, iCAST

Raphael will present information on Bio-diesel and vegetable oil as alternative fuels options. iCAST has worked to produce the Seeds to Diesel Program that demonstrates a small scale working system that produces bio-diesel from oil seed crops. iCAST works with many forms of alternative energy formats including: bio-diesel, solar, wind, and methane. This presentation will give a good overview of alternative energy sources for farmers.

2-3 p.m.

Wind Energy for the Farmstead

Tony Frank, Director of Renewable Development, Rocky Mountain Farmers Union

Tony will present information on capturing wind energy to power the farmstead. He will also discuss options that farmers have to reduce costs and power the farmstead. In addition, this presentation will provide an overview of small wind technology ranging from 1 KW to 100 KW in size. Information provided will include resources for assessment, economic incentives, manufacturers, and installers.

2009 BEEF DAY

Event Center Room C

10-10:10 a.m. Welcome and Opening Comments Mike Jarosz, Weld County Livestock Agent, CSU Extension

Feed Efficiency:

10:15-11 a.m. The Big Picture of Feed Efficiency (Importance, Trends, and Future Direction).

Dr. Denny Crews, Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences

Dr. Crews will discuss how the beef industry, in the past, has focused on selecting for output traits such as growth ” but little attention has been placed on inputs such as intake and efficiency. Now with high feed costs the industry is driven to improve efficiency and is measuring feed intake the answer to improvement? Dr. Crews will define Residual Feed Intake (RFI) as a selection trait for efficiency describing the methods to measure and any implications of selecting for RFI. He will point out how to accurately select for efficiency and make strides the industry needs to test numerous animals and implement other tools such as genetic markers.

11:05-11:50 a.m.

Fitting Feed Efficiency into the Beef Profit Equation.

Dr. Gordon Carstens, Associate Professor, Dept. of Animal Science, Texas A&M University

Dr. Carstens will characterize the use of Residual Feed Intake (RFI) in growing and finishing cattle and describe why RFI is a better efficiency trait than feed to gain ratio. He will comment on if RFI is a “real” efficiency measure that can be linked to biological processes in the animal. Dr. Carstens will discuss if RFI selection can improve profitability to the cow/calf producer and if selecting for RFI will negatively affect reproduction, growth, carcass performance, or meat quality. He will wrap-up with discussing if other traits such as eating behavior (meals/day, etc.) are predictive of RFI and ultimately efficiency.

LUNCH BREAK 11:55 – 12:55 p.m.

Marketing:

1-1:45 p.m. Receiving Rewards for Paperwork

Kevin Miller, Herd Manager, Croissant Red Angus

Kevin will address how beef producers can reap financial rewards from simple paperwork. He will give example of what they do on their operation following cattle from birth through harvest and every step along the way. Plus, Kevin will discuss how Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) is being implemented and ways producers can capitalize on this initiative

1:50-2:25 p.m. Starting a Producer Calf Marketing COOP

Dean Oatman, Las Animas County Agriculture, Livestock, & 4-H Agent, CSU Extension

In his area, Dean is organizing a group of cow/calf producers bringing their calves together to market in larger groups of like calves to improve marketability and potential profitability. Dean will discuss their approach and the ideas that they are using for the marketing group to be successful.

2:30-3 p.m. Producer experience of a Calf Marketing COOP

Larry Hoozee, Cow/calf Operation Owner – Stoneham, Colo.

Larry will discuss, from a producer perspective, his experience being involved with a calf marketing group. He will address why the group formed, what went well, what challenges the group faced, and if he believes he received a premium for his calves due to the group.

2009 EQUINE DAY

Grasslands/Pawnee Buttes Room

8:30-10 a.m.

Preparing for the Use of Frozen Stallion Semen

Trace Linnebur, Owner, Genetic Innovations, LLC – Deer Trail, CO

Trace will conduct a discussion/laboratory session in which several topics will be addressed including an overview of the semen freezing process, normal and abnormal sperm cell motility and morphology, and the importance of good semen quality. The proper way to receive a frozen semen shipment will be presented, as well as techniques for thawing and preparing semen for AI use.

10 a.m.-Noon

Angular Limb Deformities and Developmental Tendon Disorders

Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO

It is not unusual for a foal to be born with an angular limb deformity (crooked legs) or a developmental tendon disorder (knuckling forward or contracted tendons). Some of these deformities will self correct, while some will not. Dr. Jergens will discuss all of these conditions. She will explain which conditions correct, the conditions that won’t correct, and when to take action! She will discuss conservative and surgical treatments of these problems.

12-1 p.m. LUNCH BREAK

1-4 p.m.

Tendon Injuries and Their Management

Dr. Amy J. Jergens, Equine Staff Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Service – Greeley, CO

Tendon and ligament injuries are a significant cause of lameness in the equine athlete. Racing, jumping, endurance, or barrel racing predispose horses to these types of injuries. Horses of all breeds and uses, including the backyard or light use horse, can also injure these structures. Dr. Jergens will discuss tendon and ligament injuries, their diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. She will demonstrate effective rehabilitation techniques in a hands-on lab following the lecture.

Thursday

January 29

PARTNERS IN AG

Event Center Room A

9 -10a.m.

Using Soil Testing to Evaluate Soil Quality

Jim Self, Director, CSU Soil, Water, and Plant Testing Laboratory – Ft. Collins, CO

The use of soil testing is an effective way to determine the productivity and quality of the soil. Although a soil’s appearance can give an idea of its structure or texture, it cannot give a true indication of the nutrient content, salt level, or metal concentrations in the soil. A soil test provides the information to make informed decisions on how to manage the soil for enhanced productivity, make better use of resources, and obtain greater financial returns.

10:30-11:30a.m.

Grass, Water, and Energy – How Do They Fit?

Don Hijar, Owner/Manager, Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc.-Greeley, CO

Everyone knows there’s a lot of work to be done when you start to grow any crop; plowing, disc work, and adding chemicals are a few of the expenses a farmer experiences. It also takes a large amount of energy and time to get a good crop established from year to year. But, if you plant grass rather than a conventional crop, your energy expenditure establishing a pasture will be cut down tremendously. As costs continue to rise and access to water gets tighter, planting the correct kind of grass can reduce your materials, energy, and irrigation expenses overall. Don will discuss the benefits of growing native grasses in a different manner than most conventional methods.

11:30-1:00 LUNCH BREAK

1-2p.m.

Organic Fertilizers and Soil Amendments

Jim Holland, Owner, Unlimited Expectations-Denver, CO

Organic fertilizers and soil amendments to be used are usually dependent on the information determined by the area soil test. The soil should always be tested prior to using any materials to prevent worsening the soil. After the determination has been made, it will be necessary to decide what the purpose of the area will be used for because any growing material is considered to be a crop. http://www.unlimited_expectations.com

HAY AND FORAGE

Exhibition Room

10-11a.m.

National Alfalfa and Forage Alliance Update

Rod Christensen, Executive Secretary, National Alfalfa & Forage Alliance – Kennewick, WA

Rod will be giving an update on NAFA activities and will explain how the organization operates and what the organization’s goals are. He will also be reporting on the current status of the re-deregulation efforts in the biotechnology industry. In addition, Rod will also share some of NAFA’s efforts in trying to bring various parties together to develop co-existence strategies.

11a.m. to Noon

Carbon Credits: A New Source for Farming Revenue

Lowell Messman, Aggregation Specialist, AgraGate Climate Credits Corporation – West Des Moines, IA

Farm and ranch operators interested in learning more about opportunities in the market for carbon credits from their hay and forage crops and other land should plan to attend this one hour presentation. Lowell will discuss how the emerging carbon credits market is a new revenue opportunity for farm and ranch operators. He will give participants an understanding of the sign-up process so they can enroll their credits and begin to generate an additional return from their investment in conservation practices. Eligible practices include no-till and strip-till cropping, new forage plantings, sustainably managed rangeland, and methane destruction from livestock manure lagoons.

12-1p.m. LUNCH BREAK

1-2p.m.

Strip-Tillage is Beyond a Tool-A Systems Approach to Better Soil Management

Michael Petersen, Precision Tillage Agronomist, Orthman Manufacturing Inc. – Lexington, NE

David Zimmerer, Sales Manager, Schlagel Manufacturing – Torrington, WY

Tillage work has been wrongly presented as a beginning to a destructive end. With soils that have undergone intense tillage for the past 90-100 years for row crop production, the advocates of the quality conservation tillage approach have given a one bullet approach to recovery – Direct Seeding only. Utilizing a residue management program, vertical tillage in a specific zone, calculated and targeted fertilization program within the same zone as the tillage, we are able to improve soil quality within 3 years that benefits a farmer’s management system to improve yields, better control of inputs, wiser use of the grower’s time, and resources. In this presentation we will cover the systems approach to strip-tillage, benefits to soil characteristics that have been measured, and discuss fertilization management techniques that are cutting edge for growers to consider.

SPANISH EDUCATION

Grassland/Pawnee Butte Room

10a.m.-12p.m.

Dairy Cow Well-Being: Identifying and Managing Cows at Risk of Becoming Downers

Dr. Noa Roman-Muniz, Extension Dairy Specialist/Assistant Professor, CSU Dept. Animal Sciences-Ft. Collins, CO

In order to achieve our goal of assuring animal well-being and preventing cattle from becoming downers on the dairy farm, trailer or sale barn, we must become better observers and understand what animals are at risk of becoming non-ambulatory. The key is to identify animals at risk earlier on and deciding in a timely manner how to manage that animal. Should we treat the disease, cull, or euthanize on the farm? We will discuss the impact that management decisions could have on animal well-being, public safety, and public perception.

Bienestar de vacas lecheras: identificando y manejando vacas a riesgo de caerse

Para alcanzar la meta de asegurar el bienestar animal y prevenir que las vacas se caigan en la lecheria, durante el transporte o en la venta, necesitamos convertirnos en mejores observadores y entender que animales estan en riesgo de caerse y permanecer postrados. La clave es identificar a los animales en riesgo pronto y tomar una decision respecto a como manejarlos. ¿Debemos tratar la enfermedad, venderlos o administrar eutanasia en la lecheria? Discutiremos el impacto que las decisiones de manejo pueden tener en el bienestar animal, la salud publica y la percepcion del publico. v


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