2011 Colorado Farm Show Schedule | TheFencePost.com

2011 Colorado Farm Show Schedule

Colorado Farm Show
Island Grove Regional Park
Greeley, Colo.

Beef Day, Events Center Room A

9:20-9:30 a.m.

Welcome: An Update On What Is New in the CSU Animal Sciences Department.

9:30-10:30 a.m.

Current Issues Related To Animal Handling and Animal Care

Dr. Temple Grandin, Professor of Animal Science, Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

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Safe, efficient handling of livestock is an important aspect of producing food from animals. The safety of the animal, as well as the safety of the person handling them, must be considered. Dr. Grandin is a world-renowned authority in both animal handling and animal care. During her presentation, Dr. Grandin will address current issues, industry driven changes, and enhancements to animal handling processes designed to improve safety and animal care when processing livestock on the farm and during the harvest process.

10:30-11:15 a.m.

Colorado Resource Monitoring Program-Colorado Cattlemen’s Association: Industry News

Robbie Baird LeValley, Area Livestock & Range Ext. Agent, Tri River Area Plus Region, CSU Extension, Delta, Colo., President Colorado Cattlemen’s Association, Arvada, Colo.,

The Colorado Resource Monitoring Program is an initiative that began two years ago and is a partnership between CSU, BLM, U.S. Forest Service, Colorado State Forest Service, Colorado DOW, NRCS, Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative, Colorado State Land Board, Colorado Section of Society of Range Management, and CCA. The result is the Colorado Resource Monitoring manual which is being distributed across the state. Robbie will discuss how monitoring can aid landowners, companies, policy makers, and other natural resource managers in designing management practices to achieve particular goals and improve on-the-ground decisions

11:15-11:25 a.m. Break ($50 door prize)

11:25 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Improving Feed Efficiency In Mature Beef Cows – Are We Making Progress?

Dr. Jason Ahola, Assoc. Prof., Beef Production Systems, Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Feed is the largest variable cost on most cow/calf operations in the U.S., and the largest cost item in the “profitability equation” over which a producer has control. The ability to reduce feed intake and feed costs without negatively affecting reproduction, growth, carcass performance, or meat quality is becoming a priority in beef cattle selection programs. In the past several years, much of feed efficiency testing in beef cattle has focused on cattle feedlot conditions on either forage or grain-based diets. However, the relationship between feed efficiency in feedlot cattle and feed efficiency in mature cows is still not well understood, even though cow/calf producers may benefit the most from improvements in feed efficiency among mature cows.

12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch Break

1:00-1:30 p.m.

The Use of Genomic Data For Genetic Prediction In Beef Cattle – An Update

Center for Genetic Evaluation of Livestock (CGEL), Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Faculty from Colorado State University’s Center for Genetic Evaluation of Livestock (CGEL) will provide attendees with an update on the nature and availability of assessing genomic value in beef cattle, including how data may be useful to producers. Attendees will be given insight into potential genetic evaluation tools that incorporate the optimal combination of phenotypic, pedigree, and genomic data – resulting in additive and permanent genetic improvement of the national cattle population.

1:30-2:00 p.m.

What Are Today’s Beef Consumers Demanding and How is The Industry Responding?

Dr. Dale Woerner, Asst. Prof., Center for Meat Safety and Quality, Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Strong demand for beef by U.S. and international consumers is crucial to sustain strong prices for beef cattle. For decades, end users of beef predominantly focused on its palatability and quality. However, in recent years, beef consumers have become increasingly concerned about how their beef was produced. The discussion will focus on today’s beef consumer and how their focus is changing. Beef consumption trends will be discussed, including challenges and opportunities for the beef industry. Updates on meats research projects at CSU will also be provided, including the areas of pre- and post-harvest management of meat quality and palatability, instrument use for carcass value determination, and meat packaging and shelf-life.

2:00-2:05 p.m. Break ($50 door prize)

2:05-2:30 p.m.

Colorado Animal Health Update

Dr. Keith Roehr, Colorado State Veterinarian, Colorado Department of Agriculture, Lakewood, Colo.

The health of livestock is of utmost importance to Colorado livestock producers and the Colorado State Veterinarian. Dr. Roehr will discuss how the Department of Agriculture accomplishes disease control and eradication and how the incidence of disease and the associated response efforts are a dynamic and ever changing process.

Ag Spotlight

Events Center Room C

10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Agricultural and Commodity Outlook

Steve Koontz, Assoc. Prof., Dept. of Agricultural & Resource Economics, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

The agricultural and commodity outlook for 2011 is a key component for producers to look at when making risk management decisions related to both the purchasing and selling of agricultural and commodity products. In this time of uncertainty, it is important that the producers gather as much information as possible to navigate through changeable times. Steve will discuss commodity markets, price analysis, futures markets and risk management, and market organization and performance.

12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch Break

1:00-2:30 p.m.

Tax Implications on Agricultural Producers

Jeff Tranel, Agricultural & Business Economist, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Information pertaining to changes in tax laws related to tax cuts or increases is necessary to help producers do yearly planning. In this new era of uncertainty and unknowns, it is important to gather information that will help producers plan for risk issues that arise and to be proactive.

2:30-3:30 p.m.

Conservation Easements 101

Ryan Boggs, Executive Director, Legacy Land Trust, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Ryan will discuss the basics of conserving your land for the future using conservation easements, including information on tax benefits, while still owning the land. You will leave with a strong understanding of what conservation easements are and how they can benefit you.

Equine Day

Grasslands/Pawnee Buttes Room

9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

An Update on Treatments for Performance Limiting Conditions in the Athletic Horse

Dr. Josh Zacharias, Equine Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Services, Greeley, Colo.

The athletic horse can be plagued by injuries and conditions that limit performance, may render a horse unusable for a period of time, and at times may be career ending. When a good horse that is winning in the arena or being put to good use in the pasture can be hard to replace, one should know their options for treatment of a particular problem to have the best chance of getting the horse back up to full potential. Most conditions of the horse have multiple treatment options that can have varying degrees of success. Many new and exciting methods have been introduced in the past few years that have given veterinarians an additional arsenal to combat the performance horse’s most devastating problems. Current topics involving arthritis and treatments addressing this disease will be discussed. These include arthroscopy, joint injections, IRAP, shockwave therapy, and other surgical alternatives. Tendon and ligament disorders will be discussed and the relevance of stem cell, platelet rich plasma, shockwave, and surgical therapies for these. Upper respiratory conditions that limit performance, including displacement of the soft plate, epiglottic entrapment, laryngeal hemiplegia, and exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage and various treatments will be overviewed. Other topics to be covered include distal limb fractures and other potential career-ending conditions.

12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch Break

1:30-3:00 p.m.

Animal Chiropractic Without the Manual Adjustments.

Dr. Kristy Campbell, D.C. Greeley Chiropractic Center, Greeley, Colo.

This session will include a discussion of VOM Technology and instrument based adjustment with cold laser therapy. Dr. Campbell will discuss how to maintain your work or pleasure horses and dogs with a neurologic based treatment. Veterinary Orthopedic Manipulation (VOM) is a healing technology that locates areas of the animal’s nervous system that has fallen out of communication, and re-establishes neuronal communication and thus induces healing. VOM is singularly the most simple, effective and safe healing modality in chiropractic care to date.

Beef Day, Events Center Room A

9:20-9:30 a.m.

Welcome: An Update On What Is New in the CSU Animal Sciences Department.

9:30-10:30 a.m.

Current Issues Related To Animal Handling and Animal Care

Dr. Temple Grandin, Professor of Animal Science, Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Safe, efficient handling of livestock is an important aspect of producing food from animals. The safety of the animal, as well as the safety of the person handling them, must be considered. Dr. Grandin is a world-renowned authority in both animal handling and animal care. During her presentation, Dr. Grandin will address current issues, industry driven changes, and enhancements to animal handling processes designed to improve safety and animal care when processing livestock on the farm and during the harvest process.

10:30-11:15 a.m.

Colorado Resource Monitoring Program-Colorado Cattlemen’s Association: Industry News

Robbie Baird LeValley, Area Livestock & Range Ext. Agent, Tri River Area Plus Region, CSU Extension, Delta, Colo., President Colorado Cattlemen’s Association, Arvada, Colo.,

The Colorado Resource Monitoring Program is an initiative that began two years ago and is a partnership between CSU, BLM, U.S. Forest Service, Colorado State Forest Service, Colorado DOW, NRCS, Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative, Colorado State Land Board, Colorado Section of Society of Range Management, and CCA. The result is the Colorado Resource Monitoring manual which is being distributed across the state. Robbie will discuss how monitoring can aid landowners, companies, policy makers, and other natural resource managers in designing management practices to achieve particular goals and improve on-the-ground decisions

11:15-11:25 a.m. Break ($50 door prize)

11:25 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Improving Feed Efficiency In Mature Beef Cows – Are We Making Progress?

Dr. Jason Ahola, Assoc. Prof., Beef Production Systems, Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Feed is the largest variable cost on most cow/calf operations in the U.S., and the largest cost item in the “profitability equation” over which a producer has control. The ability to reduce feed intake and feed costs without negatively affecting reproduction, growth, carcass performance, or meat quality is becoming a priority in beef cattle selection programs. In the past several years, much of feed efficiency testing in beef cattle has focused on cattle feedlot conditions on either forage or grain-based diets. However, the relationship between feed efficiency in feedlot cattle and feed efficiency in mature cows is still not well understood, even though cow/calf producers may benefit the most from improvements in feed efficiency among mature cows.

12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch Break

1:00-1:30 p.m.

The Use of Genomic Data For Genetic Prediction In Beef Cattle – An Update

Center for Genetic Evaluation of Livestock (CGEL), Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Faculty from Colorado State University’s Center for Genetic Evaluation of Livestock (CGEL) will provide attendees with an update on the nature and availability of assessing genomic value in beef cattle, including how data may be useful to producers. Attendees will be given insight into potential genetic evaluation tools that incorporate the optimal combination of phenotypic, pedigree, and genomic data – resulting in additive and permanent genetic improvement of the national cattle population.

1:30-2:00 p.m.

What Are Today’s Beef Consumers Demanding and How is The Industry Responding?

Dr. Dale Woerner, Asst. Prof., Center for Meat Safety and Quality, Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Strong demand for beef by U.S. and international consumers is crucial to sustain strong prices for beef cattle. For decades, end users of beef predominantly focused on its palatability and quality. However, in recent years, beef consumers have become increasingly concerned about how their beef was produced. The discussion will focus on today’s beef consumer and how their focus is changing. Beef consumption trends will be discussed, including challenges and opportunities for the beef industry. Updates on meats research projects at CSU will also be provided, including the areas of pre- and post-harvest management of meat quality and palatability, instrument use for carcass value determination, and meat packaging and shelf-life.

2:00-2:05 p.m. Break ($50 door prize)

2:05-2:30 p.m.

Colorado Animal Health Update

Dr. Keith Roehr, Colorado State Veterinarian, Colorado Department of Agriculture, Lakewood, Colo.

The health of livestock is of utmost importance to Colorado livestock producers and the Colorado State Veterinarian. Dr. Roehr will discuss how the Department of Agriculture accomplishes disease control and eradication and how the incidence of disease and the associated response efforts are a dynamic and ever changing process.

Ag Spotlight

Events Center Room C

10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Agricultural and Commodity Outlook

Steve Koontz, Assoc. Prof., Dept. of Agricultural & Resource Economics, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

The agricultural and commodity outlook for 2011 is a key component for producers to look at when making risk management decisions related to both the purchasing and selling of agricultural and commodity products. In this time of uncertainty, it is important that the producers gather as much information as possible to navigate through changeable times. Steve will discuss commodity markets, price analysis, futures markets and risk management, and market organization and performance.

12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch Break

1:00-2:30 p.m.

Tax Implications on Agricultural Producers

Jeff Tranel, Agricultural & Business Economist, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Information pertaining to changes in tax laws related to tax cuts or increases is necessary to help producers do yearly planning. In this new era of uncertainty and unknowns, it is important to gather information that will help producers plan for risk issues that arise and to be proactive.

2:30-3:30 p.m.

Conservation Easements 101

Ryan Boggs, Executive Director, Legacy Land Trust, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Ryan will discuss the basics of conserving your land for the future using conservation easements, including information on tax benefits, while still owning the land. You will leave with a strong understanding of what conservation easements are and how they can benefit you.

Equine Day

Grasslands/Pawnee Buttes Room

9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

An Update on Treatments for Performance Limiting Conditions in the Athletic Horse

Dr. Josh Zacharias, Equine Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Services, Greeley, Colo.

The athletic horse can be plagued by injuries and conditions that limit performance, may render a horse unusable for a period of time, and at times may be career ending. When a good horse that is winning in the arena or being put to good use in the pasture can be hard to replace, one should know their options for treatment of a particular problem to have the best chance of getting the horse back up to full potential. Most conditions of the horse have multiple treatment options that can have varying degrees of success. Many new and exciting methods have been introduced in the past few years that have given veterinarians an additional arsenal to combat the performance horse’s most devastating problems. Current topics involving arthritis and treatments addressing this disease will be discussed. These include arthroscopy, joint injections, IRAP, shockwave therapy, and other surgical alternatives. Tendon and ligament disorders will be discussed and the relevance of stem cell, platelet rich plasma, shockwave, and surgical therapies for these. Upper respiratory conditions that limit performance, including displacement of the soft plate, epiglottic entrapment, laryngeal hemiplegia, and exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage and various treatments will be overviewed. Other topics to be covered include distal limb fractures and other potential career-ending conditions.

12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch Break

1:30-3:00 p.m.

Animal Chiropractic Without the Manual Adjustments.

Dr. Kristy Campbell, D.C. Greeley Chiropractic Center, Greeley, Colo.

This session will include a discussion of VOM Technology and instrument based adjustment with cold laser therapy. Dr. Campbell will discuss how to maintain your work or pleasure horses and dogs with a neurologic based treatment. Veterinary Orthopedic Manipulation (VOM) is a healing technology that locates areas of the animal’s nervous system that has fallen out of communication, and re-establishes neuronal communication and thus induces healing. VOM is singularly the most simple, effective and safe healing modality in chiropractic care to date.

Beef Day, Events Center Room A

9:20-9:30 a.m.

Welcome: An Update On What Is New in the CSU Animal Sciences Department.

9:30-10:30 a.m.

Current Issues Related To Animal Handling and Animal Care

Dr. Temple Grandin, Professor of Animal Science, Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Safe, efficient handling of livestock is an important aspect of producing food from animals. The safety of the animal, as well as the safety of the person handling them, must be considered. Dr. Grandin is a world-renowned authority in both animal handling and animal care. During her presentation, Dr. Grandin will address current issues, industry driven changes, and enhancements to animal handling processes designed to improve safety and animal care when processing livestock on the farm and during the harvest process.

10:30-11:15 a.m.

Colorado Resource Monitoring Program-Colorado Cattlemen’s Association: Industry News

Robbie Baird LeValley, Area Livestock & Range Ext. Agent, Tri River Area Plus Region, CSU Extension, Delta, Colo., President Colorado Cattlemen’s Association, Arvada, Colo.,

The Colorado Resource Monitoring Program is an initiative that began two years ago and is a partnership between CSU, BLM, U.S. Forest Service, Colorado State Forest Service, Colorado DOW, NRCS, Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative, Colorado State Land Board, Colorado Section of Society of Range Management, and CCA. The result is the Colorado Resource Monitoring manual which is being distributed across the state. Robbie will discuss how monitoring can aid landowners, companies, policy makers, and other natural resource managers in designing management practices to achieve particular goals and improve on-the-ground decisions

11:15-11:25 a.m. Break ($50 door prize)

11:25 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Improving Feed Efficiency In Mature Beef Cows – Are We Making Progress?

Dr. Jason Ahola, Assoc. Prof., Beef Production Systems, Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Feed is the largest variable cost on most cow/calf operations in the U.S., and the largest cost item in the “profitability equation” over which a producer has control. The ability to reduce feed intake and feed costs without negatively affecting reproduction, growth, carcass performance, or meat quality is becoming a priority in beef cattle selection programs. In the past several years, much of feed efficiency testing in beef cattle has focused on cattle feedlot conditions on either forage or grain-based diets. However, the relationship between feed efficiency in feedlot cattle and feed efficiency in mature cows is still not well understood, even though cow/calf producers may benefit the most from improvements in feed efficiency among mature cows.

12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch Break

1:00-1:30 p.m.

The Use of Genomic Data For Genetic Prediction In Beef Cattle – An Update

Center for Genetic Evaluation of Livestock (CGEL), Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Faculty from Colorado State University’s Center for Genetic Evaluation of Livestock (CGEL) will provide attendees with an update on the nature and availability of assessing genomic value in beef cattle, including how data may be useful to producers. Attendees will be given insight into potential genetic evaluation tools that incorporate the optimal combination of phenotypic, pedigree, and genomic data – resulting in additive and permanent genetic improvement of the national cattle population.

1:30-2:00 p.m.

What Are Today’s Beef Consumers Demanding and How is The Industry Responding?

Dr. Dale Woerner, Asst. Prof., Center for Meat Safety and Quality, Dept. of Animal Sciences, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Strong demand for beef by U.S. and international consumers is crucial to sustain strong prices for beef cattle. For decades, end users of beef predominantly focused on its palatability and quality. However, in recent years, beef consumers have become increasingly concerned about how their beef was produced. The discussion will focus on today’s beef consumer and how their focus is changing. Beef consumption trends will be discussed, including challenges and opportunities for the beef industry. Updates on meats research projects at CSU will also be provided, including the areas of pre- and post-harvest management of meat quality and palatability, instrument use for carcass value determination, and meat packaging and shelf-life.

2:00-2:05 p.m. Break ($50 door prize)

2:05-2:30 p.m.

Colorado Animal Health Update

Dr. Keith Roehr, Colorado State Veterinarian, Colorado Department of Agriculture, Lakewood, Colo.

The health of livestock is of utmost importance to Colorado livestock producers and the Colorado State Veterinarian. Dr. Roehr will discuss how the Department of Agriculture accomplishes disease control and eradication and how the incidence of disease and the associated response efforts are a dynamic and ever changing process.

Ag Spotlight

Events Center Room C

10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Agricultural and Commodity Outlook

Steve Koontz, Assoc. Prof., Dept. of Agricultural & Resource Economics, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

The agricultural and commodity outlook for 2011 is a key component for producers to look at when making risk management decisions related to both the purchasing and selling of agricultural and commodity products. In this time of uncertainty, it is important that the producers gather as much information as possible to navigate through changeable times. Steve will discuss commodity markets, price analysis, futures markets and risk management, and market organization and performance.

12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch Break

1:00-2:30 p.m.

Tax Implications on Agricultural Producers

Jeff Tranel, Agricultural & Business Economist, CSU, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Information pertaining to changes in tax laws related to tax cuts or increases is necessary to help producers do yearly planning. In this new era of uncertainty and unknowns, it is important to gather information that will help producers plan for risk issues that arise and to be proactive.

2:30-3:30 p.m.

Conservation Easements 101

Ryan Boggs, Executive Director, Legacy Land Trust, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Ryan will discuss the basics of conserving your land for the future using conservation easements, including information on tax benefits, while still owning the land. You will leave with a strong understanding of what conservation easements are and how they can benefit you.

Equine Day

Grasslands/Pawnee Buttes Room

9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

An Update on Treatments for Performance Limiting Conditions in the Athletic Horse

Dr. Josh Zacharias, Equine Surgeon, Countryside Large Animal Veterinary Services, Greeley, Colo.

The athletic horse can be plagued by injuries and conditions that limit performance, may render a horse unusable for a period of time, and at times may be career ending. When a good horse that is winning in the arena or being put to good use in the pasture can be hard to replace, one should know their options for treatment of a particular problem to have the best chance of getting the horse back up to full potential. Most conditions of the horse have multiple treatment options that can have varying degrees of success. Many new and exciting methods have been introduced in the past few years that have given veterinarians an additional arsenal to combat the performance horse’s most devastating problems. Current topics involving arthritis and treatments addressing this disease will be discussed. These include arthroscopy, joint injections, IRAP, shockwave therapy, and other surgical alternatives. Tendon and ligament disorders will be discussed and the relevance of stem cell, platelet rich plasma, shockwave, and surgical therapies for these. Upper respiratory conditions that limit performance, including displacement of the soft plate, epiglottic entrapment, laryngeal hemiplegia, and exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage and various treatments will be overviewed. Other topics to be covered include distal limb fractures and other potential career-ending conditions.

12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch Break

1:30-3:00 p.m.

Animal Chiropractic Without the Manual Adjustments.

Dr. Kristy Campbell, D.C. Greeley Chiropractic Center, Greeley, Colo.

This session will include a discussion of VOM Technology and instrument based adjustment with cold laser therapy. Dr. Campbell will discuss how to maintain your work or pleasure horses and dogs with a neurologic based treatment. Veterinary Orthopedic Manipulation (VOM) is a healing technology that locates areas of the animal’s nervous system that has fallen out of communication, and re-establishes neuronal communication and thus induces healing. VOM is singularly the most simple, effective and safe healing modality in chiropractic care to date.