2011 Larimer County Fair was a booming success | TheFencePost.com

2011 Larimer County Fair was a booming success

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr.
Ft. Collins, Colo.

Robyn SchererGrace Brown takes her goat kid through the obstacle course. The participants had to take their goats over bales, across a tarp, over a jump, through water and then through handing tubes.

Fireworks exploded just outside of the fairgrounds, as the Ferris Wheel turned and the carnival lights flashed brilliantly. This was the scene on the weekend nights of the 132nd Larimer County Fair, held at The Ranch in Loveland, Colo., Aug. 5-9.

Thousands of people attended over the five days it operated. Spectators were treated to livestock shows, pig racing, square dancing, fishing, a tractor show, a brew fest, rodeos and a carnival.

One crowds favorite event was the Hambone Express, which featured four races of four pot bellied pigs each. Charles Boger, who runs the event, calls his pigs “The fastest swine off the line.”

The pigs are decorated with bandanas, and race around a small track to the cheers of the fans. The races happened several times throughout the day, and community members from the winning cheering sections became honorary members of the National Pig Race Association.

Other events that were popular included the Gnarly Barley Brew Fest, which allowed breweries to showcase their beers, and people could vote on their favorites. A total of 24 breweries competed, with the top prize, People’s Choice, going to Loveland’s Grimm Brothers Brewhouse, owned and operated by Russell Fruits.

JAX sponsored the Timberworks Lumberjack Show, where three professionals demonstrated log-rolling, ax throwing and pole climbing. Lumberjack professionals competed in pole climbing to cheers from the audience.

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Children were given the opportunity to catch a fish in a 6,000 gallon tank. The children, 12 and under, were each allowed to catch one rainbow trout, which were provided by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The clear sided tank allowed others to watch the fish, and for the children to see where the fish were biting.

4-H members exhibited 1,110 entries, from livestock to scrapbooking, and cake decorating to photography. Local community members also competed in many of the same events.

The goat show, held the day before the main fair started, was a special day for one exhibitor. The smile on her face gave away her excitement as she was handed the blue ribbon and trophy for her Grand Champion Market Goat.

“This is the grand champion right here,” said Chelsea Dobbs, 13, as she waited in the holding pen for the champion drive to start. It turns out she was right.

Dobbs market whether, a December born kid named Justin, was the champion medium heavyweight market goat, and he went on to win the overall title. Dobbs had another goat in the drive, the champion lightweight market goat. Madessa Hoffer-Dye, 15, also had two goats in the championship drive, and her champion medium lightweight goat was named the Reserve Champion.

“Blacktip was born Feb. 11, and was a set of triplet bucks. They were all big babies at about 10 pounds. He had been my favorite since the beginning because of his wide chest and big rear,” said Hoffer-Dye.

She also won the rate of gain contest with one of her other market goats, who started at 51 pounds and weighed in at the fair at 96 pounds, with an average daily gain of .46 pounds. “I was excited. I’ve been working for three years to get that cross with a high rate of gain and still be a nice eye catching show whether. He was 75 percent Boer and 25 percent Lamancha, which I think is a really nice market cross,” Hoffer-Dye said.

Hard work and careful breeding paid off for both girls. “I worked with my goats everyday,” said Dobbs. “We worked on leading, setting up and bracing.”

This is Dobb’s fourth year showing, and she raises all her own kids, as does Hoffer-Dye. “It’s incredible to see goats of this quality raised locally. Great job,” said judge Marcus Arnold to the girls.

Dobb’s mother, Chrissy, credits Chelsea for her work with the goats. “This is the first year we have really done well. I feel great. I think Chelsea reaped the benefits of her hard work. She’s getting a return on her time investment,” Chrissy Dobbs said.

“Chelsea has been working with them a little bit every day, and that made a huge difference. We were vigilant about their exercise.”

Chelsea Dobbs later sold Justin during the Junior Livestock sale for $1,000, and Hoffer-Dye’s market goat brought $1,100.”

The Junior Livestock Sale, held on Wednesday, August 10, brought in $241,600, over 206 animals. “Started in 1960, the Larimer County Junior Livestock Sale is held in conjunction with the Larimer County Fair and Rodeo with the cooperation of the Larimer County Fair Board and the CSU/Larimer County Cooperative Extension office. The sale provides an outlet for 4-H exhibitors to sell wholesome meat animals that they have raised. The Sale strives to sell each animal at a price above the current market in order to give the youth the opportunity to reinvest the excess funds in their future,” according to Larimer County Extension.

Buyers could buy animals, or could do an add-on, which is a donation to an exhibitor. Add-ons could also be done to a species, or to the general sale. It is estimated that this year’s auction brought in about $14,000 more than last year.

The Extension service credits the success of the sale to family members and 4-H leaders. “The adult support given by parents, leaders and advisors is extremely important to the success of the Sale. Guidance is given to the exhibitor in selection, feeding and care of the animal to insure that the consumer receives top quality wholesome meat.”

In addition to the sale, several nights of the fair, a PRCA rodeo was hosted in the Budweiser Events Center. Cowboys and cowgirls competed in bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, team roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

Over the course of the fair, spectators and exhibitors had a chance to participate in various events. The success of the fair is greatly helped by sponsors, who allow the fair to be free of charge to the public. Ranch-Way Feeds was the main sponsor, with others including 41 other area sponsors.

Fireworks exploded just outside of the fairgrounds, as the Ferris Wheel turned and the carnival lights flashed brilliantly. This was the scene on the weekend nights of the 132nd Larimer County Fair, held at The Ranch in Loveland, Colo., Aug. 5-9.

Thousands of people attended over the five days it operated. Spectators were treated to livestock shows, pig racing, square dancing, fishing, a tractor show, a brew fest, rodeos and a carnival.

One crowds favorite event was the Hambone Express, which featured four races of four pot bellied pigs each. Charles Boger, who runs the event, calls his pigs “The fastest swine off the line.”

The pigs are decorated with bandanas, and race around a small track to the cheers of the fans. The races happened several times throughout the day, and community members from the winning cheering sections became honorary members of the National Pig Race Association.

Other events that were popular included the Gnarly Barley Brew Fest, which allowed breweries to showcase their beers, and people could vote on their favorites. A total of 24 breweries competed, with the top prize, People’s Choice, going to Loveland’s Grimm Brothers Brewhouse, owned and operated by Russell Fruits.

JAX sponsored the Timberworks Lumberjack Show, where three professionals demonstrated log-rolling, ax throwing and pole climbing. Lumberjack professionals competed in pole climbing to cheers from the audience.

Children were given the opportunity to catch a fish in a 6,000 gallon tank. The children, 12 and under, were each allowed to catch one rainbow trout, which were provided by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The clear sided tank allowed others to watch the fish, and for the children to see where the fish were biting.

4-H members exhibited 1,110 entries, from livestock to scrapbooking, and cake decorating to photography. Local community members also competed in many of the same events.

The goat show, held the day before the main fair started, was a special day for one exhibitor. The smile on her face gave away her excitement as she was handed the blue ribbon and trophy for her Grand Champion Market Goat.

“This is the grand champion right here,” said Chelsea Dobbs, 13, as she waited in the holding pen for the champion drive to start. It turns out she was right.

Dobbs market whether, a December born kid named Justin, was the champion medium heavyweight market goat, and he went on to win the overall title. Dobbs had another goat in the drive, the champion lightweight market goat. Madessa Hoffer-Dye, 15, also had two goats in the championship drive, and her champion medium lightweight goat was named the Reserve Champion.

“Blacktip was born Feb. 11, and was a set of triplet bucks. They were all big babies at about 10 pounds. He had been my favorite since the beginning because of his wide chest and big rear,” said Hoffer-Dye.

She also won the rate of gain contest with one of her other market goats, who started at 51 pounds and weighed in at the fair at 96 pounds, with an average daily gain of .46 pounds. “I was excited. I’ve been working for three years to get that cross with a high rate of gain and still be a nice eye catching show whether. He was 75 percent Boer and 25 percent Lamancha, which I think is a really nice market cross,” Hoffer-Dye said.

Hard work and careful breeding paid off for both girls. “I worked with my goats everyday,” said Dobbs. “We worked on leading, setting up and bracing.”

This is Dobb’s fourth year showing, and she raises all her own kids, as does Hoffer-Dye. “It’s incredible to see goats of this quality raised locally. Great job,” said judge Marcus Arnold to the girls.

Dobb’s mother, Chrissy, credits Chelsea for her work with the goats. “This is the first year we have really done well. I feel great. I think Chelsea reaped the benefits of her hard work. She’s getting a return on her time investment,” Chrissy Dobbs said.

“Chelsea has been working with them a little bit every day, and that made a huge difference. We were vigilant about their exercise.”

Chelsea Dobbs later sold Justin during the Junior Livestock sale for $1,000, and Hoffer-Dye’s market goat brought $1,100.”

The Junior Livestock Sale, held on Wednesday, August 10, brought in $241,600, over 206 animals. “Started in 1960, the Larimer County Junior Livestock Sale is held in conjunction with the Larimer County Fair and Rodeo with the cooperation of the Larimer County Fair Board and the CSU/Larimer County Cooperative Extension office. The sale provides an outlet for 4-H exhibitors to sell wholesome meat animals that they have raised. The Sale strives to sell each animal at a price above the current market in order to give the youth the opportunity to reinvest the excess funds in their future,” according to Larimer County Extension.

Buyers could buy animals, or could do an add-on, which is a donation to an exhibitor. Add-ons could also be done to a species, or to the general sale. It is estimated that this year’s auction brought in about $14,000 more than last year.

The Extension service credits the success of the sale to family members and 4-H leaders. “The adult support given by parents, leaders and advisors is extremely important to the success of the Sale. Guidance is given to the exhibitor in selection, feeding and care of the animal to insure that the consumer receives top quality wholesome meat.”

In addition to the sale, several nights of the fair, a PRCA rodeo was hosted in the Budweiser Events Center. Cowboys and cowgirls competed in bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, team roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

Over the course of the fair, spectators and exhibitors had a chance to participate in various events. The success of the fair is greatly helped by sponsors, who allow the fair to be free of charge to the public. Ranch-Way Feeds was the main sponsor, with others including 41 other area sponsors.

Fireworks exploded just outside of the fairgrounds, as the Ferris Wheel turned and the carnival lights flashed brilliantly. This was the scene on the weekend nights of the 132nd Larimer County Fair, held at The Ranch in Loveland, Colo., Aug. 5-9.

Thousands of people attended over the five days it operated. Spectators were treated to livestock shows, pig racing, square dancing, fishing, a tractor show, a brew fest, rodeos and a carnival.

One crowds favorite event was the Hambone Express, which featured four races of four pot bellied pigs each. Charles Boger, who runs the event, calls his pigs “The fastest swine off the line.”

The pigs are decorated with bandanas, and race around a small track to the cheers of the fans. The races happened several times throughout the day, and community members from the winning cheering sections became honorary members of the National Pig Race Association.

Other events that were popular included the Gnarly Barley Brew Fest, which allowed breweries to showcase their beers, and people could vote on their favorites. A total of 24 breweries competed, with the top prize, People’s Choice, going to Loveland’s Grimm Brothers Brewhouse, owned and operated by Russell Fruits.

JAX sponsored the Timberworks Lumberjack Show, where three professionals demonstrated log-rolling, ax throwing and pole climbing. Lumberjack professionals competed in pole climbing to cheers from the audience.

Children were given the opportunity to catch a fish in a 6,000 gallon tank. The children, 12 and under, were each allowed to catch one rainbow trout, which were provided by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The clear sided tank allowed others to watch the fish, and for the children to see where the fish were biting.

4-H members exhibited 1,110 entries, from livestock to scrapbooking, and cake decorating to photography. Local community members also competed in many of the same events.

The goat show, held the day before the main fair started, was a special day for one exhibitor. The smile on her face gave away her excitement as she was handed the blue ribbon and trophy for her Grand Champion Market Goat.

“This is the grand champion right here,” said Chelsea Dobbs, 13, as she waited in the holding pen for the champion drive to start. It turns out she was right.

Dobbs market whether, a December born kid named Justin, was the champion medium heavyweight market goat, and he went on to win the overall title. Dobbs had another goat in the drive, the champion lightweight market goat. Madessa Hoffer-Dye, 15, also had two goats in the championship drive, and her champion medium lightweight goat was named the Reserve Champion.

“Blacktip was born Feb. 11, and was a set of triplet bucks. They were all big babies at about 10 pounds. He had been my favorite since the beginning because of his wide chest and big rear,” said Hoffer-Dye.

She also won the rate of gain contest with one of her other market goats, who started at 51 pounds and weighed in at the fair at 96 pounds, with an average daily gain of .46 pounds. “I was excited. I’ve been working for three years to get that cross with a high rate of gain and still be a nice eye catching show whether. He was 75 percent Boer and 25 percent Lamancha, which I think is a really nice market cross,” Hoffer-Dye said.

Hard work and careful breeding paid off for both girls. “I worked with my goats everyday,” said Dobbs. “We worked on leading, setting up and bracing.”

This is Dobb’s fourth year showing, and she raises all her own kids, as does Hoffer-Dye. “It’s incredible to see goats of this quality raised locally. Great job,” said judge Marcus Arnold to the girls.

Dobb’s mother, Chrissy, credits Chelsea for her work with the goats. “This is the first year we have really done well. I feel great. I think Chelsea reaped the benefits of her hard work. She’s getting a return on her time investment,” Chrissy Dobbs said.

“Chelsea has been working with them a little bit every day, and that made a huge difference. We were vigilant about their exercise.”

Chelsea Dobbs later sold Justin during the Junior Livestock sale for $1,000, and Hoffer-Dye’s market goat brought $1,100.”

The Junior Livestock Sale, held on Wednesday, August 10, brought in $241,600, over 206 animals. “Started in 1960, the Larimer County Junior Livestock Sale is held in conjunction with the Larimer County Fair and Rodeo with the cooperation of the Larimer County Fair Board and the CSU/Larimer County Cooperative Extension office. The sale provides an outlet for 4-H exhibitors to sell wholesome meat animals that they have raised. The Sale strives to sell each animal at a price above the current market in order to give the youth the opportunity to reinvest the excess funds in their future,” according to Larimer County Extension.

Buyers could buy animals, or could do an add-on, which is a donation to an exhibitor. Add-ons could also be done to a species, or to the general sale. It is estimated that this year’s auction brought in about $14,000 more than last year.

The Extension service credits the success of the sale to family members and 4-H leaders. “The adult support given by parents, leaders and advisors is extremely important to the success of the Sale. Guidance is given to the exhibitor in selection, feeding and care of the animal to insure that the consumer receives top quality wholesome meat.”

In addition to the sale, several nights of the fair, a PRCA rodeo was hosted in the Budweiser Events Center. Cowboys and cowgirls competed in bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, team roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

Over the course of the fair, spectators and exhibitors had a chance to participate in various events. The success of the fair is greatly helped by sponsors, who allow the fair to be free of charge to the public. Ranch-Way Feeds was the main sponsor, with others including 41 other area sponsors.

Fireworks exploded just outside of the fairgrounds, as the Ferris Wheel turned and the carnival lights flashed brilliantly. This was the scene on the weekend nights of the 132nd Larimer County Fair, held at The Ranch in Loveland, Colo., Aug. 5-9.

Thousands of people attended over the five days it operated. Spectators were treated to livestock shows, pig racing, square dancing, fishing, a tractor show, a brew fest, rodeos and a carnival.

One crowds favorite event was the Hambone Express, which featured four races of four pot bellied pigs each. Charles Boger, who runs the event, calls his pigs “The fastest swine off the line.”

The pigs are decorated with bandanas, and race around a small track to the cheers of the fans. The races happened several times throughout the day, and community members from the winning cheering sections became honorary members of the National Pig Race Association.

Other events that were popular included the Gnarly Barley Brew Fest, which allowed breweries to showcase their beers, and people could vote on their favorites. A total of 24 breweries competed, with the top prize, People’s Choice, going to Loveland’s Grimm Brothers Brewhouse, owned and operated by Russell Fruits.

JAX sponsored the Timberworks Lumberjack Show, where three professionals demonstrated log-rolling, ax throwing and pole climbing. Lumberjack professionals competed in pole climbing to cheers from the audience.

Children were given the opportunity to catch a fish in a 6,000 gallon tank. The children, 12 and under, were each allowed to catch one rainbow trout, which were provided by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The clear sided tank allowed others to watch the fish, and for the children to see where the fish were biting.

4-H members exhibited 1,110 entries, from livestock to scrapbooking, and cake decorating to photography. Local community members also competed in many of the same events.

The goat show, held the day before the main fair started, was a special day for one exhibitor. The smile on her face gave away her excitement as she was handed the blue ribbon and trophy for her Grand Champion Market Goat.

“This is the grand champion right here,” said Chelsea Dobbs, 13, as she waited in the holding pen for the champion drive to start. It turns out she was right.

Dobbs market whether, a December born kid named Justin, was the champion medium heavyweight market goat, and he went on to win the overall title. Dobbs had another goat in the drive, the champion lightweight market goat. Madessa Hoffer-Dye, 15, also had two goats in the championship drive, and her champion medium lightweight goat was named the Reserve Champion.

“Blacktip was born Feb. 11, and was a set of triplet bucks. They were all big babies at about 10 pounds. He had been my favorite since the beginning because of his wide chest and big rear,” said Hoffer-Dye.

She also won the rate of gain contest with one of her other market goats, who started at 51 pounds and weighed in at the fair at 96 pounds, with an average daily gain of .46 pounds. “I was excited. I’ve been working for three years to get that cross with a high rate of gain and still be a nice eye catching show whether. He was 75 percent Boer and 25 percent Lamancha, which I think is a really nice market cross,” Hoffer-Dye said.

Hard work and careful breeding paid off for both girls. “I worked with my goats everyday,” said Dobbs. “We worked on leading, setting up and bracing.”

This is Dobb’s fourth year showing, and she raises all her own kids, as does Hoffer-Dye. “It’s incredible to see goats of this quality raised locally. Great job,” said judge Marcus Arnold to the girls.

Dobb’s mother, Chrissy, credits Chelsea for her work with the goats. “This is the first year we have really done well. I feel great. I think Chelsea reaped the benefits of her hard work. She’s getting a return on her time investment,” Chrissy Dobbs said.

“Chelsea has been working with them a little bit every day, and that made a huge difference. We were vigilant about their exercise.”

Chelsea Dobbs later sold Justin during the Junior Livestock sale for $1,000, and Hoffer-Dye’s market goat brought $1,100.”

The Junior Livestock Sale, held on Wednesday, August 10, brought in $241,600, over 206 animals. “Started in 1960, the Larimer County Junior Livestock Sale is held in conjunction with the Larimer County Fair and Rodeo with the cooperation of the Larimer County Fair Board and the CSU/Larimer County Cooperative Extension office. The sale provides an outlet for 4-H exhibitors to sell wholesome meat animals that they have raised. The Sale strives to sell each animal at a price above the current market in order to give the youth the opportunity to reinvest the excess funds in their future,” according to Larimer County Extension.

Buyers could buy animals, or could do an add-on, which is a donation to an exhibitor. Add-ons could also be done to a species, or to the general sale. It is estimated that this year’s auction brought in about $14,000 more than last year.

The Extension service credits the success of the sale to family members and 4-H leaders. “The adult support given by parents, leaders and advisors is extremely important to the success of the Sale. Guidance is given to the exhibitor in selection, feeding and care of the animal to insure that the consumer receives top quality wholesome meat.”

In addition to the sale, several nights of the fair, a PRCA rodeo was hosted in the Budweiser Events Center. Cowboys and cowgirls competed in bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, team roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

Over the course of the fair, spectators and exhibitors had a chance to participate in various events. The success of the fair is greatly helped by sponsors, who allow the fair to be free of charge to the public. Ranch-Way Feeds was the main sponsor, with others including 41 other area sponsors.

Fireworks exploded just outside of the fairgrounds, as the Ferris Wheel turned and the carnival lights flashed brilliantly. This was the scene on the weekend nights of the 132nd Larimer County Fair, held at The Ranch in Loveland, Colo., Aug. 5-9.

Thousands of people attended over the five days it operated. Spectators were treated to livestock shows, pig racing, square dancing, fishing, a tractor show, a brew fest, rodeos and a carnival.

One crowds favorite event was the Hambone Express, which featured four races of four pot bellied pigs each. Charles Boger, who runs the event, calls his pigs “The fastest swine off the line.”

The pigs are decorated with bandanas, and race around a small track to the cheers of the fans. The races happened several times throughout the day, and community members from the winning cheering sections became honorary members of the National Pig Race Association.

Other events that were popular included the Gnarly Barley Brew Fest, which allowed breweries to showcase their beers, and people could vote on their favorites. A total of 24 breweries competed, with the top prize, People’s Choice, going to Loveland’s Grimm Brothers Brewhouse, owned and operated by Russell Fruits.

JAX sponsored the Timberworks Lumberjack Show, where three professionals demonstrated log-rolling, ax throwing and pole climbing. Lumberjack professionals competed in pole climbing to cheers from the audience.

Children were given the opportunity to catch a fish in a 6,000 gallon tank. The children, 12 and under, were each allowed to catch one rainbow trout, which were provided by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The clear sided tank allowed others to watch the fish, and for the children to see where the fish were biting.

4-H members exhibited 1,110 entries, from livestock to scrapbooking, and cake decorating to photography. Local community members also competed in many of the same events.

The goat show, held the day before the main fair started, was a special day for one exhibitor. The smile on her face gave away her excitement as she was handed the blue ribbon and trophy for her Grand Champion Market Goat.

“This is the grand champion right here,” said Chelsea Dobbs, 13, as she waited in the holding pen for the champion drive to start. It turns out she was right.

Dobbs market whether, a December born kid named Justin, was the champion medium heavyweight market goat, and he went on to win the overall title. Dobbs had another goat in the drive, the champion lightweight market goat. Madessa Hoffer-Dye, 15, also had two goats in the championship drive, and her champion medium lightweight goat was named the Reserve Champion.

“Blacktip was born Feb. 11, and was a set of triplet bucks. They were all big babies at about 10 pounds. He had been my favorite since the beginning because of his wide chest and big rear,” said Hoffer-Dye.

She also won the rate of gain contest with one of her other market goats, who started at 51 pounds and weighed in at the fair at 96 pounds, with an average daily gain of .46 pounds. “I was excited. I’ve been working for three years to get that cross with a high rate of gain and still be a nice eye catching show whether. He was 75 percent Boer and 25 percent Lamancha, which I think is a really nice market cross,” Hoffer-Dye said.

Hard work and careful breeding paid off for both girls. “I worked with my goats everyday,” said Dobbs. “We worked on leading, setting up and bracing.”

This is Dobb’s fourth year showing, and she raises all her own kids, as does Hoffer-Dye. “It’s incredible to see goats of this quality raised locally. Great job,” said judge Marcus Arnold to the girls.

Dobb’s mother, Chrissy, credits Chelsea for her work with the goats. “This is the first year we have really done well. I feel great. I think Chelsea reaped the benefits of her hard work. She’s getting a return on her time investment,” Chrissy Dobbs said.

“Chelsea has been working with them a little bit every day, and that made a huge difference. We were vigilant about their exercise.”

Chelsea Dobbs later sold Justin during the Junior Livestock sale for $1,000, and Hoffer-Dye’s market goat brought $1,100.”

The Junior Livestock Sale, held on Wednesday, August 10, brought in $241,600, over 206 animals. “Started in 1960, the Larimer County Junior Livestock Sale is held in conjunction with the Larimer County Fair and Rodeo with the cooperation of the Larimer County Fair Board and the CSU/Larimer County Cooperative Extension office. The sale provides an outlet for 4-H exhibitors to sell wholesome meat animals that they have raised. The Sale strives to sell each animal at a price above the current market in order to give the youth the opportunity to reinvest the excess funds in their future,” according to Larimer County Extension.

Buyers could buy animals, or could do an add-on, which is a donation to an exhibitor. Add-ons could also be done to a species, or to the general sale. It is estimated that this year’s auction brought in about $14,000 more than last year.

The Extension service credits the success of the sale to family members and 4-H leaders. “The adult support given by parents, leaders and advisors is extremely important to the success of the Sale. Guidance is given to the exhibitor in selection, feeding and care of the animal to insure that the consumer receives top quality wholesome meat.”

In addition to the sale, several nights of the fair, a PRCA rodeo was hosted in the Budweiser Events Center. Cowboys and cowgirls competed in bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, team roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

Over the course of the fair, spectators and exhibitors had a chance to participate in various events. The success of the fair is greatly helped by sponsors, who allow the fair to be free of charge to the public. Ranch-Way Feeds was the main sponsor, with others including 41 other area sponsors.

Fireworks exploded just outside of the fairgrounds, as the Ferris Wheel turned and the carnival lights flashed brilliantly. This was the scene on the weekend nights of the 132nd Larimer County Fair, held at The Ranch in Loveland, Colo., Aug. 5-9.

Thousands of people attended over the five days it operated. Spectators were treated to livestock shows, pig racing, square dancing, fishing, a tractor show, a brew fest, rodeos and a carnival.

One crowds favorite event was the Hambone Express, which featured four races of four pot bellied pigs each. Charles Boger, who runs the event, calls his pigs “The fastest swine off the line.”

The pigs are decorated with bandanas, and race around a small track to the cheers of the fans. The races happened several times throughout the day, and community members from the winning cheering sections became honorary members of the National Pig Race Association.

Other events that were popular included the Gnarly Barley Brew Fest, which allowed breweries to showcase their beers, and people could vote on their favorites. A total of 24 breweries competed, with the top prize, People’s Choice, going to Loveland’s Grimm Brothers Brewhouse, owned and operated by Russell Fruits.

JAX sponsored the Timberworks Lumberjack Show, where three professionals demonstrated log-rolling, ax throwing and pole climbing. Lumberjack professionals competed in pole climbing to cheers from the audience.

Children were given the opportunity to catch a fish in a 6,000 gallon tank. The children, 12 and under, were each allowed to catch one rainbow trout, which were provided by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The clear sided tank allowed others to watch the fish, and for the children to see where the fish were biting.

4-H members exhibited 1,110 entries, from livestock to scrapbooking, and cake decorating to photography. Local community members also competed in many of the same events.

The goat show, held the day before the main fair started, was a special day for one exhibitor. The smile on her face gave away her excitement as she was handed the blue ribbon and trophy for her Grand Champion Market Goat.

“This is the grand champion right here,” said Chelsea Dobbs, 13, as she waited in the holding pen for the champion drive to start. It turns out she was right.

Dobbs market whether, a December born kid named Justin, was the champion medium heavyweight market goat, and he went on to win the overall title. Dobbs had another goat in the drive, the champion lightweight market goat. Madessa Hoffer-Dye, 15, also had two goats in the championship drive, and her champion medium lightweight goat was named the Reserve Champion.

“Blacktip was born Feb. 11, and was a set of triplet bucks. They were all big babies at about 10 pounds. He had been my favorite since the beginning because of his wide chest and big rear,” said Hoffer-Dye.

She also won the rate of gain contest with one of her other market goats, who started at 51 pounds and weighed in at the fair at 96 pounds, with an average daily gain of .46 pounds. “I was excited. I’ve been working for three years to get that cross with a high rate of gain and still be a nice eye catching show whether. He was 75 percent Boer and 25 percent Lamancha, which I think is a really nice market cross,” Hoffer-Dye said.

Hard work and careful breeding paid off for both girls. “I worked with my goats everyday,” said Dobbs. “We worked on leading, setting up and bracing.”

This is Dobb’s fourth year showing, and she raises all her own kids, as does Hoffer-Dye. “It’s incredible to see goats of this quality raised locally. Great job,” said judge Marcus Arnold to the girls.

Dobb’s mother, Chrissy, credits Chelsea for her work with the goats. “This is the first year we have really done well. I feel great. I think Chelsea reaped the benefits of her hard work. She’s getting a return on her time investment,” Chrissy Dobbs said.

“Chelsea has been working with them a little bit every day, and that made a huge difference. We were vigilant about their exercise.”

Chelsea Dobbs later sold Justin during the Junior Livestock sale for $1,000, and Hoffer-Dye’s market goat brought $1,100.”

The Junior Livestock Sale, held on Wednesday, August 10, brought in $241,600, over 206 animals. “Started in 1960, the Larimer County Junior Livestock Sale is held in conjunction with the Larimer County Fair and Rodeo with the cooperation of the Larimer County Fair Board and the CSU/Larimer County Cooperative Extension office. The sale provides an outlet for 4-H exhibitors to sell wholesome meat animals that they have raised. The Sale strives to sell each animal at a price above the current market in order to give the youth the opportunity to reinvest the excess funds in their future,” according to Larimer County Extension.

Buyers could buy animals, or could do an add-on, which is a donation to an exhibitor. Add-ons could also be done to a species, or to the general sale. It is estimated that this year’s auction brought in about $14,000 more than last year.

The Extension service credits the success of the sale to family members and 4-H leaders. “The adult support given by parents, leaders and advisors is extremely important to the success of the Sale. Guidance is given to the exhibitor in selection, feeding and care of the animal to insure that the consumer receives top quality wholesome meat.”

In addition to the sale, several nights of the fair, a PRCA rodeo was hosted in the Budweiser Events Center. Cowboys and cowgirls competed in bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, team roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

Over the course of the fair, spectators and exhibitors had a chance to participate in various events. The success of the fair is greatly helped by sponsors, who allow the fair to be free of charge to the public. Ranch-Way Feeds was the main sponsor, with others including 41 other area sponsors.

Fireworks exploded just outside of the fairgrounds, as the Ferris Wheel turned and the carnival lights flashed brilliantly. This was the scene on the weekend nights of the 132nd Larimer County Fair, held at The Ranch in Loveland, Colo., Aug. 5-9.

Thousands of people attended over the five days it operated. Spectators were treated to livestock shows, pig racing, square dancing, fishing, a tractor show, a brew fest, rodeos and a carnival.

One crowds favorite event was the Hambone Express, which featured four races of four pot bellied pigs each. Charles Boger, who runs the event, calls his pigs “The fastest swine off the line.”

The pigs are decorated with bandanas, and race around a small track to the cheers of the fans. The races happened several times throughout the day, and community members from the winning cheering sections became honorary members of the National Pig Race Association.

Other events that were popular included the Gnarly Barley Brew Fest, which allowed breweries to showcase their beers, and people could vote on their favorites. A total of 24 breweries competed, with the top prize, People’s Choice, going to Loveland’s Grimm Brothers Brewhouse, owned and operated by Russell Fruits.

JAX sponsored the Timberworks Lumberjack Show, where three professionals demonstrated log-rolling, ax throwing and pole climbing. Lumberjack professionals competed in pole climbing to cheers from the audience.

Children were given the opportunity to catch a fish in a 6,000 gallon tank. The children, 12 and under, were each allowed to catch one rainbow trout, which were provided by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. The clear sided tank allowed others to watch the fish, and for the children to see where the fish were biting.

4-H members exhibited 1,110 entries, from livestock to scrapbooking, and cake decorating to photography. Local community members also competed in many of the same events.

The goat show, held the day before the main fair started, was a special day for one exhibitor. The smile on her face gave away her excitement as she was handed the blue ribbon and trophy for her Grand Champion Market Goat.

“This is the grand champion right here,” said Chelsea Dobbs, 13, as she waited in the holding pen for the champion drive to start. It turns out she was right.

Dobbs market whether, a December born kid named Justin, was the champion medium heavyweight market goat, and he went on to win the overall title. Dobbs had another goat in the drive, the champion lightweight market goat. Madessa Hoffer-Dye, 15, also had two goats in the championship drive, and her champion medium lightweight goat was named the Reserve Champion.

“Blacktip was born Feb. 11, and was a set of triplet bucks. They were all big babies at about 10 pounds. He had been my favorite since the beginning because of his wide chest and big rear,” said Hoffer-Dye.

She also won the rate of gain contest with one of her other market goats, who started at 51 pounds and weighed in at the fair at 96 pounds, with an average daily gain of .46 pounds. “I was excited. I’ve been working for three years to get that cross with a high rate of gain and still be a nice eye catching show whether. He was 75 percent Boer and 25 percent Lamancha, which I think is a really nice market cross,” Hoffer-Dye said.

Hard work and careful breeding paid off for both girls. “I worked with my goats everyday,” said Dobbs. “We worked on leading, setting up and bracing.”

This is Dobb’s fourth year showing, and she raises all her own kids, as does Hoffer-Dye. “It’s incredible to see goats of this quality raised locally. Great job,” said judge Marcus Arnold to the girls.

Dobb’s mother, Chrissy, credits Chelsea for her work with the goats. “This is the first year we have really done well. I feel great. I think Chelsea reaped the benefits of her hard work. She’s getting a return on her time investment,” Chrissy Dobbs said.

“Chelsea has been working with them a little bit every day, and that made a huge difference. We were vigilant about their exercise.”

Chelsea Dobbs later sold Justin during the Junior Livestock sale for $1,000, and Hoffer-Dye’s market goat brought $1,100.”

The Junior Livestock Sale, held on Wednesday, August 10, brought in $241,600, over 206 animals. “Started in 1960, the Larimer County Junior Livestock Sale is held in conjunction with the Larimer County Fair and Rodeo with the cooperation of the Larimer County Fair Board and the CSU/Larimer County Cooperative Extension office. The sale provides an outlet for 4-H exhibitors to sell wholesome meat animals that they have raised. The Sale strives to sell each animal at a price above the current market in order to give the youth the opportunity to reinvest the excess funds in their future,” according to Larimer County Extension.

Buyers could buy animals, or could do an add-on, which is a donation to an exhibitor. Add-ons could also be done to a species, or to the general sale. It is estimated that this year’s auction brought in about $14,000 more than last year.

The Extension service credits the success of the sale to family members and 4-H leaders. “The adult support given by parents, leaders and advisors is extremely important to the success of the Sale. Guidance is given to the exhibitor in selection, feeding and care of the animal to insure that the consumer receives top quality wholesome meat.”

In addition to the sale, several nights of the fair, a PRCA rodeo was hosted in the Budweiser Events Center. Cowboys and cowgirls competed in bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, team roping, barrel racing and bull riding.

Over the course of the fair, spectators and exhibitors had a chance to participate in various events. The success of the fair is greatly helped by sponsors, who allow the fair to be free of charge to the public. Ranch-Way Feeds was the main sponsor, with others including 41 other area sponsors.