A family Christmas includes baking traditions | TheFencePost.com

A family Christmas includes baking traditions

LuAnn Schindler
Ewing, Neb.

Four generations of the Larson family that cooks together for Christmas: (back row) Scott Schindler, LuAnn Schindler, Laurie Larson, Lamont Larson, Amanda Thaten and Courtney Kaiser. (front row) Lacey Schindler, Barbara Larson holding great grandson Marvin Thaten, and Cassandra Seagren.

When I was growing up, my family kicked off Christmas with an all-day bake-a-thon and candy-making session every second Saturday in December. You name it, we made it: fudge, divinity, sugared nuts, cherry mash bars, sugar cookies, mounds bars, and my dad’s famous cashew clusters. I imagine I missed a few delicacies in this list. It wasn’t about the food. It was about family spending time together. A delicious, yearly ritual.

Each year we would consider new recipes worth trying. Sometimes, we’d find a new favorite, like the nut-stuffed Swedish tea ring loaded with cinnamon and pecans and coated with a sweet icing. Occasionally, the recipes would fail, like the peanut brittle that remained a river of liquid with peanuts floating like lily pads.

When my girls were younger, we continued the tradition, except we spread it across several days after school was dismissed for holiday break. As they grew older and time constraints interfered, the Christmas candy custom concluded. I miss it, but I hope I can entice my grandchildren to spend a Saturday in the kitchen making holiday treats with grandma.

Here are a few of our favorite recipes:

When I was growing up, my family kicked off Christmas with an all-day bake-a-thon and candy-making session every second Saturday in December. You name it, we made it: fudge, divinity, sugared nuts, cherry mash bars, sugar cookies, mounds bars, and my dad’s famous cashew clusters. I imagine I missed a few delicacies in this list. It wasn’t about the food. It was about family spending time together. A delicious, yearly ritual.

Each year we would consider new recipes worth trying. Sometimes, we’d find a new favorite, like the nut-stuffed Swedish tea ring loaded with cinnamon and pecans and coated with a sweet icing. Occasionally, the recipes would fail, like the peanut brittle that remained a river of liquid with peanuts floating like lily pads.

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When my girls were younger, we continued the tradition, except we spread it across several days after school was dismissed for holiday break. As they grew older and time constraints interfered, the Christmas candy custom concluded. I miss it, but I hope I can entice my grandchildren to spend a Saturday in the kitchen making holiday treats with grandma.

Here are a few of our favorite recipes:

When I was growing up, my family kicked off Christmas with an all-day bake-a-thon and candy-making session every second Saturday in December. You name it, we made it: fudge, divinity, sugared nuts, cherry mash bars, sugar cookies, mounds bars, and my dad’s famous cashew clusters. I imagine I missed a few delicacies in this list. It wasn’t about the food. It was about family spending time together. A delicious, yearly ritual.

Each year we would consider new recipes worth trying. Sometimes, we’d find a new favorite, like the nut-stuffed Swedish tea ring loaded with cinnamon and pecans and coated with a sweet icing. Occasionally, the recipes would fail, like the peanut brittle that remained a river of liquid with peanuts floating like lily pads.

When my girls were younger, we continued the tradition, except we spread it across several days after school was dismissed for holiday break. As they grew older and time constraints interfered, the Christmas candy custom concluded. I miss it, but I hope I can entice my grandchildren to spend a Saturday in the kitchen making holiday treats with grandma.

Here are a few of our favorite recipes:

When I was growing up, my family kicked off Christmas with an all-day bake-a-thon and candy-making session every second Saturday in December. You name it, we made it: fudge, divinity, sugared nuts, cherry mash bars, sugar cookies, mounds bars, and my dad’s famous cashew clusters. I imagine I missed a few delicacies in this list. It wasn’t about the food. It was about family spending time together. A delicious, yearly ritual.

Each year we would consider new recipes worth trying. Sometimes, we’d find a new favorite, like the nut-stuffed Swedish tea ring loaded with cinnamon and pecans and coated with a sweet icing. Occasionally, the recipes would fail, like the peanut brittle that remained a river of liquid with peanuts floating like lily pads.

When my girls were younger, we continued the tradition, except we spread it across several days after school was dismissed for holiday break. As they grew older and time constraints interfered, the Christmas candy custom concluded. I miss it, but I hope I can entice my grandchildren to spend a Saturday in the kitchen making holiday treats with grandma.

Here are a few of our favorite recipes: