A southern gentleman’s farm toys | TheFencePost.com

A southern gentleman’s farm toys

Fred Hendricks
Bucyrus, Ohio

The Oatts Farm Toy team pictured at their welcoming sign; l/r: Charles Oats, Shirley Oatts, Brian Oatts and Tommy Johnson.

What do you call a person who lives in the south, farms several thousand acres for grain production, has a bunch of antique tractors displayed in museums in two states, collects farm toys, including pedal tractors and owns a farm toy store? Some would call him a Southern Gentleman.

Charles Oatts is a true Southern Gentleman, but he does not take all the credit for the aforementioned family enterprises. “While each family member has varied interests, we’re all involved. My wife, Shirley, is very supportive and as active as any wife could be. Our son, Brian and his wife, Carla and their two children are involved with all facets of our family farm. And a 36-year loyal employee, Tommy Johnson, helps manage the farm toy store and restores the antique tractors. In addition, numerous other employees make untold contributions to the farm business,” Charles shared.

The Oatts Family farm business is located in Hopkinsville, a community in the fertile Pennyrile region of southwestern Kentucky. Charles grew up on the family farm helping with the tobacco, hay and grain cropping. Their livestock included; beef, hogs and a small herd of milk cows. He attended a one-room school for grades one through seven with the same teacher all seven grades.

After high school graduation, Charles began his college studies. Charles farmed part time during college. With a degree in hand, Charles taught school and served as a school administrator. After a short stint in the classroom, he started farming full time. His management and farming skills were honed as the family developed their many enterprises.

In addition to the fertile crop farming around Hopkinsville, the area is also known for the production of Dark Fired Tobacco used in chewing tobacco and cigar production. In the early part of the 20th century tobacco planters formed an association of Dark Tobacco producers who organized the Night Riders. This group rebelled against the corporate monopoly: the American Tobacco Company (ATC) for their sub-market prices. Their rebellion included the burning of the company tobacco barns, plant beds and warehouses. These actions resulted in more equitable prices for the tobacco growers.

What do you call a person who lives in the south, farms several thousand acres for grain production, has a bunch of antique tractors displayed in museums in two states, collects farm toys, including pedal tractors and owns a farm toy store? Some would call him a Southern Gentleman.

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Charles Oatts is a true Southern Gentleman, but he does not take all the credit for the aforementioned family enterprises. “While each family member has varied interests, we’re all involved. My wife, Shirley, is very supportive and as active as any wife could be. Our son, Brian and his wife, Carla and their two children are involved with all facets of our family farm. And a 36-year loyal employee, Tommy Johnson, helps manage the farm toy store and restores the antique tractors. In addition, numerous other employees make untold contributions to the farm business,” Charles shared.

The Oatts Family farm business is located in Hopkinsville, a community in the fertile Pennyrile region of southwestern Kentucky. Charles grew up on the family farm helping with the tobacco, hay and grain cropping. Their livestock included; beef, hogs and a small herd of milk cows. He attended a one-room school for grades one through seven with the same teacher all seven grades.

After high school graduation, Charles began his college studies. Charles farmed part time during college. With a degree in hand, Charles taught school and served as a school administrator. After a short stint in the classroom, he started farming full time. His management and farming skills were honed as the family developed their many enterprises.

In addition to the fertile crop farming around Hopkinsville, the area is also known for the production of Dark Fired Tobacco used in chewing tobacco and cigar production. In the early part of the 20th century tobacco planters formed an association of Dark Tobacco producers who organized the Night Riders. This group rebelled against the corporate monopoly: the American Tobacco Company (ATC) for their sub-market prices. Their rebellion included the burning of the company tobacco barns, plant beds and warehouses. These actions resulted in more equitable prices for the tobacco growers.

What do you call a person who lives in the south, farms several thousand acres for grain production, has a bunch of antique tractors displayed in museums in two states, collects farm toys, including pedal tractors and owns a farm toy store? Some would call him a Southern Gentleman.

Charles Oatts is a true Southern Gentleman, but he does not take all the credit for the aforementioned family enterprises. “While each family member has varied interests, we’re all involved. My wife, Shirley, is very supportive and as active as any wife could be. Our son, Brian and his wife, Carla and their two children are involved with all facets of our family farm. And a 36-year loyal employee, Tommy Johnson, helps manage the farm toy store and restores the antique tractors. In addition, numerous other employees make untold contributions to the farm business,” Charles shared.

The Oatts Family farm business is located in Hopkinsville, a community in the fertile Pennyrile region of southwestern Kentucky. Charles grew up on the family farm helping with the tobacco, hay and grain cropping. Their livestock included; beef, hogs and a small herd of milk cows. He attended a one-room school for grades one through seven with the same teacher all seven grades.

After high school graduation, Charles began his college studies. Charles farmed part time during college. With a degree in hand, Charles taught school and served as a school administrator. After a short stint in the classroom, he started farming full time. His management and farming skills were honed as the family developed their many enterprises.

In addition to the fertile crop farming around Hopkinsville, the area is also known for the production of Dark Fired Tobacco used in chewing tobacco and cigar production. In the early part of the 20th century tobacco planters formed an association of Dark Tobacco producers who organized the Night Riders. This group rebelled against the corporate monopoly: the American Tobacco Company (ATC) for their sub-market prices. Their rebellion included the burning of the company tobacco barns, plant beds and warehouses. These actions resulted in more equitable prices for the tobacco growers.

What do you call a person who lives in the south, farms several thousand acres for grain production, has a bunch of antique tractors displayed in museums in two states, collects farm toys, including pedal tractors and owns a farm toy store? Some would call him a Southern Gentleman.

Charles Oatts is a true Southern Gentleman, but he does not take all the credit for the aforementioned family enterprises. “While each family member has varied interests, we’re all involved. My wife, Shirley, is very supportive and as active as any wife could be. Our son, Brian and his wife, Carla and their two children are involved with all facets of our family farm. And a 36-year loyal employee, Tommy Johnson, helps manage the farm toy store and restores the antique tractors. In addition, numerous other employees make untold contributions to the farm business,” Charles shared.

The Oatts Family farm business is located in Hopkinsville, a community in the fertile Pennyrile region of southwestern Kentucky. Charles grew up on the family farm helping with the tobacco, hay and grain cropping. Their livestock included; beef, hogs and a small herd of milk cows. He attended a one-room school for grades one through seven with the same teacher all seven grades.

After high school graduation, Charles began his college studies. Charles farmed part time during college. With a degree in hand, Charles taught school and served as a school administrator. After a short stint in the classroom, he started farming full time. His management and farming skills were honed as the family developed their many enterprises.

In addition to the fertile crop farming around Hopkinsville, the area is also known for the production of Dark Fired Tobacco used in chewing tobacco and cigar production. In the early part of the 20th century tobacco planters formed an association of Dark Tobacco producers who organized the Night Riders. This group rebelled against the corporate monopoly: the American Tobacco Company (ATC) for their sub-market prices. Their rebellion included the burning of the company tobacco barns, plant beds and warehouses. These actions resulted in more equitable prices for the tobacco growers.

What do you call a person who lives in the south, farms several thousand acres for grain production, has a bunch of antique tractors displayed in museums in two states, collects farm toys, including pedal tractors and owns a farm toy store? Some would call him a Southern Gentleman.

Charles Oatts is a true Southern Gentleman, but he does not take all the credit for the aforementioned family enterprises. “While each family member has varied interests, we’re all involved. My wife, Shirley, is very supportive and as active as any wife could be. Our son, Brian and his wife, Carla and their two children are involved with all facets of our family farm. And a 36-year loyal employee, Tommy Johnson, helps manage the farm toy store and restores the antique tractors. In addition, numerous other employees make untold contributions to the farm business,” Charles shared.

The Oatts Family farm business is located in Hopkinsville, a community in the fertile Pennyrile region of southwestern Kentucky. Charles grew up on the family farm helping with the tobacco, hay and grain cropping. Their livestock included; beef, hogs and a small herd of milk cows. He attended a one-room school for grades one through seven with the same teacher all seven grades.

After high school graduation, Charles began his college studies. Charles farmed part time during college. With a degree in hand, Charles taught school and served as a school administrator. After a short stint in the classroom, he started farming full time. His management and farming skills were honed as the family developed their many enterprises.

In addition to the fertile crop farming around Hopkinsville, the area is also known for the production of Dark Fired Tobacco used in chewing tobacco and cigar production. In the early part of the 20th century tobacco planters formed an association of Dark Tobacco producers who organized the Night Riders. This group rebelled against the corporate monopoly: the American Tobacco Company (ATC) for their sub-market prices. Their rebellion included the burning of the company tobacco barns, plant beds and warehouses. These actions resulted in more equitable prices for the tobacco growers.

What do you call a person who lives in the south, farms several thousand acres for grain production, has a bunch of antique tractors displayed in museums in two states, collects farm toys, including pedal tractors and owns a farm toy store? Some would call him a Southern Gentleman.

Charles Oatts is a true Southern Gentleman, but he does not take all the credit for the aforementioned family enterprises. “While each family member has varied interests, we’re all involved. My wife, Shirley, is very supportive and as active as any wife could be. Our son, Brian and his wife, Carla and their two children are involved with all facets of our family farm. And a 36-year loyal employee, Tommy Johnson, helps manage the farm toy store and restores the antique tractors. In addition, numerous other employees make untold contributions to the farm business,” Charles shared.

The Oatts Family farm business is located in Hopkinsville, a community in the fertile Pennyrile region of southwestern Kentucky. Charles grew up on the family farm helping with the tobacco, hay and grain cropping. Their livestock included; beef, hogs and a small herd of milk cows. He attended a one-room school for grades one through seven with the same teacher all seven grades.

After high school graduation, Charles began his college studies. Charles farmed part time during college. With a degree in hand, Charles taught school and served as a school administrator. After a short stint in the classroom, he started farming full time. His management and farming skills were honed as the family developed their many enterprises.

In addition to the fertile crop farming around Hopkinsville, the area is also known for the production of Dark Fired Tobacco used in chewing tobacco and cigar production. In the early part of the 20th century tobacco planters formed an association of Dark Tobacco producers who organized the Night Riders. This group rebelled against the corporate monopoly: the American Tobacco Company (ATC) for their sub-market prices. Their rebellion included the burning of the company tobacco barns, plant beds and warehouses. These actions resulted in more equitable prices for the tobacco growers.