Adams Family pumpkin patch a community affair | TheFencePost.com

Adams Family pumpkin patch a community affair

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr. Staff Reporter

Marcie Beals finds a small pumpkin, and Creighton comes over to investigate. Jason Beals holds the many pumpkins the family has already picked out.

Nestled on the side of town, the Adams Family Pumpkin Patch can surprise those who don’t know where it is. But for the people of Scottsbluff, Neb., it is an annual visiting spot.

The pumpkin patch, run mainly by Cheryl Adams, is a family place where everyone can find the perfect pumpkin. The location of the farm also makes is very convenient for people to come out. “Our location is our best asset, because we are so close to town,” said Cheryl Adams, who runs the patch.

Pumpkins vary in size, color and shapes, and it can be a hard decision to pick just one, which is why most families leave with more pumpkins than they intended.

“We already have pumpkins at home, but Creighton just loves to come to the patch and pick out his own,” said Marcie Beals of Gering, Neb. “We come every year.”

Creighton Beals, 5, can be seen picking up nearly every pumpkin he touches, declaring, “I want this one!”

Soon the Beals’ car is full of pumpkins, and that’s when he finds the gourds. At one point Marcie can be heard telling him, “No more gourds,” but each new one offers a slightly different color or shape.

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Creighton’s father, Jason Beals, patiently takes each one back to the car. “We like to come because there are tons of pumpkins, and the prices are great. Creighton loves it.”

The Adams family offers the pumpkins for $.25 per pound, which allows families to bring home a large number of pumpkins for a small cost.

The pumpkin patch is open to the community on the weekends, but during the week is only used for schools. “Nearly every school comes out and picks pumpkins,” Adams said. “We charge $1 per pumpkin, so all the kids can

afford them.”

In fact, this mission is what started the pumpkin patch 16 years ago. “I had a couple friends at that time who were teachers in Gering, and so I called them and said if I plant the pumpkins, will you guys come out? They said yes,” said Adams.

Since that time, the patch brings in as many as 300 students in a day. “It’s a great way for us to work with the students,” said Adams. “We can have 11 or 12 schools come in a day, and all the kids love it.”

In addition to the pumpkin patch, the family farms 4,000 acres of other crops, including corn, sugar beets, sunflowers and dry beans. At this time, the family has brought in the beans, and started on the 1,200 acres of sugar beets, but the corn, beets and sunflowers still need to be harvested.

The farm is not all located in Scottsbluff, and is spread out over several counties. “We have acreage all over this area,” Adams said.

The family also brings in Christmas trees during the winter months, and they ship them in from Michigan. “It takes a long time to grow them ourselves, and we found a great place to get them instead,” said Adams.

Almost every member of the family is employed by the farm, and even the younger members contribute. “We all work on the farm. It really is a family operation,” said Adams.

“Our kids like it, and so do the grandkids. They help irrigate during the summer, and help with the pumpkin patch during the fall,” she continued.

Trayton, Adams’ grandson, loves working on the farm. “I love helping all the people who come, they really seem to appreciate it,” he said. Even though he is only 10, he understands the importance

of farming.

“I really want to keep farming. I love it,” he said.

For the Adams family, continuing the patch should not be a problem as long as the weather cooperates. “We have a lot of support from the community. We have had a lot of people come out and tell us we can’t quit raising pumpkins because they love coming so much,” she said.

Luckily, the family plans to continue the patch, working with students, and putting smiles on everyone who picks out a pumpkin.

The Adams Family Pumpkin Patch is located at 230710 Highland Road in Scottsbluff, Neb.

For more information please call (308) 632-7604.

Nestled on the side of town, the Adams Family Pumpkin Patch can surprise those who don’t know where it is. But for the people of Scottsbluff, Neb., it is an annual visiting spot.

The pumpkin patch, run mainly by Cheryl Adams, is a family place where everyone can find the perfect pumpkin. The location of the farm also makes is very convenient for people to come out. “Our location is our best asset, because we are so close to town,” said Cheryl Adams, who runs the patch.

Pumpkins vary in size, color and shapes, and it can be a hard decision to pick just one, which is why most families leave with more pumpkins than they intended.

“We already have pumpkins at home, but Creighton just loves to come to the patch and pick out his own,” said Marcie Beals of Gering, Neb. “We come every year.”

Creighton Beals, 5, can be seen picking up nearly every pumpkin he touches, declaring, “I want this one!”

Soon the Beals’ car is full of pumpkins, and that’s when he finds the gourds. At one point Marcie can be heard telling him, “No more gourds,” but each new one offers a slightly different color or shape.

Creighton’s father, Jason Beals, patiently takes each one back to the car. “We like to come because there are tons of pumpkins, and the prices are great. Creighton loves it.”

The Adams family offers the pumpkins for $.25 per pound, which allows families to bring home a large number of pumpkins for a small cost.

The pumpkin patch is open to the community on the weekends, but during the week is only used for schools. “Nearly every school comes out and picks pumpkins,” Adams said. “We charge $1 per pumpkin, so all the kids can

afford them.”

In fact, this mission is what started the pumpkin patch 16 years ago. “I had a couple friends at that time who were teachers in Gering, and so I called them and said if I plant the pumpkins, will you guys come out? They said yes,” said Adams.

Since that time, the patch brings in as many as 300 students in a day. “It’s a great way for us to work with the students,” said Adams. “We can have 11 or 12 schools come in a day, and all the kids love it.”

In addition to the pumpkin patch, the family farms 4,000 acres of other crops, including corn, sugar beets, sunflowers and dry beans. At this time, the family has brought in the beans, and started on the 1,200 acres of sugar beets, but the corn, beets and sunflowers still need to be harvested.

The farm is not all located in Scottsbluff, and is spread out over several counties. “We have acreage all over this area,” Adams said.

The family also brings in Christmas trees during the winter months, and they ship them in from Michigan. “It takes a long time to grow them ourselves, and we found a great place to get them instead,” said Adams.

Almost every member of the family is employed by the farm, and even the younger members contribute. “We all work on the farm. It really is a family operation,” said Adams.

“Our kids like it, and so do the grandkids. They help irrigate during the summer, and help with the pumpkin patch during the fall,” she continued.

Trayton, Adams’ grandson, loves working on the farm. “I love helping all the people who come, they really seem to appreciate it,” he said. Even though he is only 10, he understands the importance

of farming.

“I really want to keep farming. I love it,” he said.

For the Adams family, continuing the patch should not be a problem as long as the weather cooperates. “We have a lot of support from the community. We have had a lot of people come out and tell us we can’t quit raising pumpkins because they love coming so much,” she said.

Luckily, the family plans to continue the patch, working with students, and putting smiles on everyone who picks out a pumpkin.

The Adams Family Pumpkin Patch is located at 230710 Highland Road in Scottsbluff, Neb.

For more information please call (308) 632-7604.

Nestled on the side of town, the Adams Family Pumpkin Patch can surprise those who don’t know where it is. But for the people of Scottsbluff, Neb., it is an annual visiting spot.

The pumpkin patch, run mainly by Cheryl Adams, is a family place where everyone can find the perfect pumpkin. The location of the farm also makes is very convenient for people to come out. “Our location is our best asset, because we are so close to town,” said Cheryl Adams, who runs the patch.

Pumpkins vary in size, color and shapes, and it can be a hard decision to pick just one, which is why most families leave with more pumpkins than they intended.

“We already have pumpkins at home, but Creighton just loves to come to the patch and pick out his own,” said Marcie Beals of Gering, Neb. “We come every year.”

Creighton Beals, 5, can be seen picking up nearly every pumpkin he touches, declaring, “I want this one!”

Soon the Beals’ car is full of pumpkins, and that’s when he finds the gourds. At one point Marcie can be heard telling him, “No more gourds,” but each new one offers a slightly different color or shape.

Creighton’s father, Jason Beals, patiently takes each one back to the car. “We like to come because there are tons of pumpkins, and the prices are great. Creighton loves it.”

The Adams family offers the pumpkins for $.25 per pound, which allows families to bring home a large number of pumpkins for a small cost.

The pumpkin patch is open to the community on the weekends, but during the week is only used for schools. “Nearly every school comes out and picks pumpkins,” Adams said. “We charge $1 per pumpkin, so all the kids can

afford them.”

In fact, this mission is what started the pumpkin patch 16 years ago. “I had a couple friends at that time who were teachers in Gering, and so I called them and said if I plant the pumpkins, will you guys come out? They said yes,” said Adams.

Since that time, the patch brings in as many as 300 students in a day. “It’s a great way for us to work with the students,” said Adams. “We can have 11 or 12 schools come in a day, and all the kids love it.”

In addition to the pumpkin patch, the family farms 4,000 acres of other crops, including corn, sugar beets, sunflowers and dry beans. At this time, the family has brought in the beans, and started on the 1,200 acres of sugar beets, but the corn, beets and sunflowers still need to be harvested.

The farm is not all located in Scottsbluff, and is spread out over several counties. “We have acreage all over this area,” Adams said.

The family also brings in Christmas trees during the winter months, and they ship them in from Michigan. “It takes a long time to grow them ourselves, and we found a great place to get them instead,” said Adams.

Almost every member of the family is employed by the farm, and even the younger members contribute. “We all work on the farm. It really is a family operation,” said Adams.

“Our kids like it, and so do the grandkids. They help irrigate during the summer, and help with the pumpkin patch during the fall,” she continued.

Trayton, Adams’ grandson, loves working on the farm. “I love helping all the people who come, they really seem to appreciate it,” he said. Even though he is only 10, he understands the importance

of farming.

“I really want to keep farming. I love it,” he said.

For the Adams family, continuing the patch should not be a problem as long as the weather cooperates. “We have a lot of support from the community. We have had a lot of people come out and tell us we can’t quit raising pumpkins because they love coming so much,” she said.

Luckily, the family plans to continue the patch, working with students, and putting smiles on everyone who picks out a pumpkin.

The Adams Family Pumpkin Patch is located at 230710 Highland Road in Scottsbluff, Neb.

For more information please call (308) 632-7604.