Adventures in Africa – Nebraska native joins Peace Corps | TheFencePost.com

Adventures in Africa – Nebraska native joins Peace Corps

Barbara Ann Dush
Fullerton, Neb.

Kristi Scott (left) and Jenny Beth Dyes of Washington, D.C., point to the regions in Tanzania where they will be living and working.

Kristi Scott never expected to “change the world” when she joined the Peace Corps.

“But I do hope to do good for others in another country,” said the Belgrade, Neb., native.

Kristi’s interest in other cultures, nurtured by a friend’s suggestion to try the Peace Corps, prompted her to think seriously about the organization.

That, and the cold Nebraska winters.

“It was the winter of my junior year in college, and I just wanted to go somewhere else and be warm, and I was sick of school.”

Kristi filled out a Peace Corps application and was notified six months later she had been accepted. Only a month after her graduation from the University of Nebraska-Kearney in May 2009, she was off to an adventure on the African continent with 34 other volunteers.

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“It was really fast. I think it’s good it went so fast because I didn’t have time to think about it. The scariest part in the beginning was saying good-bye to my family at the Omaha airport and going to Philadelphia for a two-day orientation.

“When we finally got there, I thought ‘wow’, I’m stepping out into a country that I’ll be in for two years. When I got off the plane, the first thing I noticed was how hot and sticky it was.”

The Peace Corps staff took the volunteers to a hostel operated by nuns in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. For the next week, they adapted to the weather, time change, and the food.

“I liked the food right away. It’s pretty plain. They eat bananas with their rice and beans for sweetener, and lots of cooked vegetables like cabbage or coarse spinach. There isn’t much variety and not a lot of seasonings. You have the same thing over and over. Ugali is the main staple. It’s thick stiff corn porridge. We were pretty sick of it, but when I got to my next site, I realized how spoiled I was having this really good rice and beans.”

Kristi Scott never expected to “change the world” when she joined the Peace Corps.

“But I do hope to do good for others in another country,” said the Belgrade, Neb., native.

Kristi’s interest in other cultures, nurtured by a friend’s suggestion to try the Peace Corps, prompted her to think seriously about the organization.

That, and the cold Nebraska winters.

“It was the winter of my junior year in college, and I just wanted to go somewhere else and be warm, and I was sick of school.”

Kristi filled out a Peace Corps application and was notified six months later she had been accepted. Only a month after her graduation from the University of Nebraska-Kearney in May 2009, she was off to an adventure on the African continent with 34 other volunteers.

“It was really fast. I think it’s good it went so fast because I didn’t have time to think about it. The scariest part in the beginning was saying good-bye to my family at the Omaha airport and going to Philadelphia for a two-day orientation.

“When we finally got there, I thought ‘wow’, I’m stepping out into a country that I’ll be in for two years. When I got off the plane, the first thing I noticed was how hot and sticky it was.”

The Peace Corps staff took the volunteers to a hostel operated by nuns in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. For the next week, they adapted to the weather, time change, and the food.

“I liked the food right away. It’s pretty plain. They eat bananas with their rice and beans for sweetener, and lots of cooked vegetables like cabbage or coarse spinach. There isn’t much variety and not a lot of seasonings. You have the same thing over and over. Ugali is the main staple. It’s thick stiff corn porridge. We were pretty sick of it, but when I got to my next site, I realized how spoiled I was having this really good rice and beans.”

Kristi Scott never expected to “change the world” when she joined the Peace Corps.

“But I do hope to do good for others in another country,” said the Belgrade, Neb., native.

Kristi’s interest in other cultures, nurtured by a friend’s suggestion to try the Peace Corps, prompted her to think seriously about the organization.

That, and the cold Nebraska winters.

“It was the winter of my junior year in college, and I just wanted to go somewhere else and be warm, and I was sick of school.”

Kristi filled out a Peace Corps application and was notified six months later she had been accepted. Only a month after her graduation from the University of Nebraska-Kearney in May 2009, she was off to an adventure on the African continent with 34 other volunteers.

“It was really fast. I think it’s good it went so fast because I didn’t have time to think about it. The scariest part in the beginning was saying good-bye to my family at the Omaha airport and going to Philadelphia for a two-day orientation.

“When we finally got there, I thought ‘wow’, I’m stepping out into a country that I’ll be in for two years. When I got off the plane, the first thing I noticed was how hot and sticky it was.”

The Peace Corps staff took the volunteers to a hostel operated by nuns in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. For the next week, they adapted to the weather, time change, and the food.

“I liked the food right away. It’s pretty plain. They eat bananas with their rice and beans for sweetener, and lots of cooked vegetables like cabbage or coarse spinach. There isn’t much variety and not a lot of seasonings. You have the same thing over and over. Ugali is the main staple. It’s thick stiff corn porridge. We were pretty sick of it, but when I got to my next site, I realized how spoiled I was having this really good rice and beans.”

Kristi Scott never expected to “change the world” when she joined the Peace Corps.

“But I do hope to do good for others in another country,” said the Belgrade, Neb., native.

Kristi’s interest in other cultures, nurtured by a friend’s suggestion to try the Peace Corps, prompted her to think seriously about the organization.

That, and the cold Nebraska winters.

“It was the winter of my junior year in college, and I just wanted to go somewhere else and be warm, and I was sick of school.”

Kristi filled out a Peace Corps application and was notified six months later she had been accepted. Only a month after her graduation from the University of Nebraska-Kearney in May 2009, she was off to an adventure on the African continent with 34 other volunteers.

“It was really fast. I think it’s good it went so fast because I didn’t have time to think about it. The scariest part in the beginning was saying good-bye to my family at the Omaha airport and going to Philadelphia for a two-day orientation.

“When we finally got there, I thought ‘wow’, I’m stepping out into a country that I’ll be in for two years. When I got off the plane, the first thing I noticed was how hot and sticky it was.”

The Peace Corps staff took the volunteers to a hostel operated by nuns in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. For the next week, they adapted to the weather, time change, and the food.

“I liked the food right away. It’s pretty plain. They eat bananas with their rice and beans for sweetener, and lots of cooked vegetables like cabbage or coarse spinach. There isn’t much variety and not a lot of seasonings. You have the same thing over and over. Ugali is the main staple. It’s thick stiff corn porridge. We were pretty sick of it, but when I got to my next site, I realized how spoiled I was having this really good rice and beans.”

Kristi Scott never expected to “change the world” when she joined the Peace Corps.

“But I do hope to do good for others in another country,” said the Belgrade, Neb., native.

Kristi’s interest in other cultures, nurtured by a friend’s suggestion to try the Peace Corps, prompted her to think seriously about the organization.

That, and the cold Nebraska winters.

“It was the winter of my junior year in college, and I just wanted to go somewhere else and be warm, and I was sick of school.”

Kristi filled out a Peace Corps application and was notified six months later she had been accepted. Only a month after her graduation from the University of Nebraska-Kearney in May 2009, she was off to an adventure on the African continent with 34 other volunteers.

“It was really fast. I think it’s good it went so fast because I didn’t have time to think about it. The scariest part in the beginning was saying good-bye to my family at the Omaha airport and going to Philadelphia for a two-day orientation.

“When we finally got there, I thought ‘wow’, I’m stepping out into a country that I’ll be in for two years. When I got off the plane, the first thing I noticed was how hot and sticky it was.”

The Peace Corps staff took the volunteers to a hostel operated by nuns in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. For the next week, they adapted to the weather, time change, and the food.

“I liked the food right away. It’s pretty plain. They eat bananas with their rice and beans for sweetener, and lots of cooked vegetables like cabbage or coarse spinach. There isn’t much variety and not a lot of seasonings. You have the same thing over and over. Ugali is the main staple. It’s thick stiff corn porridge. We were pretty sick of it, but when I got to my next site, I realized how spoiled I was having this really good rice and beans.”

Kristi Scott never expected to “change the world” when she joined the Peace Corps.

“But I do hope to do good for others in another country,” said the Belgrade, Neb., native.

Kristi’s interest in other cultures, nurtured by a friend’s suggestion to try the Peace Corps, prompted her to think seriously about the organization.

That, and the cold Nebraska winters.

“It was the winter of my junior year in college, and I just wanted to go somewhere else and be warm, and I was sick of school.”

Kristi filled out a Peace Corps application and was notified six months later she had been accepted. Only a month after her graduation from the University of Nebraska-Kearney in May 2009, she was off to an adventure on the African continent with 34 other volunteers.

“It was really fast. I think it’s good it went so fast because I didn’t have time to think about it. The scariest part in the beginning was saying good-bye to my family at the Omaha airport and going to Philadelphia for a two-day orientation.

“When we finally got there, I thought ‘wow’, I’m stepping out into a country that I’ll be in for two years. When I got off the plane, the first thing I noticed was how hot and sticky it was.”

The Peace Corps staff took the volunteers to a hostel operated by nuns in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. For the next week, they adapted to the weather, time change, and the food.

“I liked the food right away. It’s pretty plain. They eat bananas with their rice and beans for sweetener, and lots of cooked vegetables like cabbage or coarse spinach. There isn’t much variety and not a lot of seasonings. You have the same thing over and over. Ugali is the main staple. It’s thick stiff corn porridge. We were pretty sick of it, but when I got to my next site, I realized how spoiled I was having this really good rice and beans.”

Kristi Scott never expected to “change the world” when she joined the Peace Corps.

“But I do hope to do good for others in another country,” said the Belgrade, Neb., native.

Kristi’s interest in other cultures, nurtured by a friend’s suggestion to try the Peace Corps, prompted her to think seriously about the organization.

That, and the cold Nebraska winters.

“It was the winter of my junior year in college, and I just wanted to go somewhere else and be warm, and I was sick of school.”

Kristi filled out a Peace Corps application and was notified six months later she had been accepted. Only a month after her graduation from the University of Nebraska-Kearney in May 2009, she was off to an adventure on the African continent with 34 other volunteers.

“It was really fast. I think it’s good it went so fast because I didn’t have time to think about it. The scariest part in the beginning was saying good-bye to my family at the Omaha airport and going to Philadelphia for a two-day orientation.

“When we finally got there, I thought ‘wow’, I’m stepping out into a country that I’ll be in for two years. When I got off the plane, the first thing I noticed was how hot and sticky it was.”

The Peace Corps staff took the volunteers to a hostel operated by nuns in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. For the next week, they adapted to the weather, time change, and the food.

“I liked the food right away. It’s pretty plain. They eat bananas with their rice and beans for sweetener, and lots of cooked vegetables like cabbage or coarse spinach. There isn’t much variety and not a lot of seasonings. You have the same thing over and over. Ugali is the main staple. It’s thick stiff corn porridge. We were pretty sick of it, but when I got to my next site, I realized how spoiled I was having this really good rice and beans.”