Apples – Fall’s most appealing fruit | TheFencePost.com

Apples – Fall’s most appealing fruit

Anna Aughenbaugh
Ft. Collins, Colo.

Courtesy Photo

I know apples are delicious, eaten one crisp fresh bite after another, but cooler temperatures and gray skies make me think of getting out my recipes that bring back memories of my grandma who had bushels of apples to use. Grandma knew how to keep the temperature just right in her wood burning range to turn out perfectly baked desserts. My gas oven warms the kitchen and fills the house with the delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon, but in my memory, Grandma’s goodies were always best.

I’m happy when friends offer me some of their apples, just for the picking, but Farmers’ Markets and grocers’ produce aisles provide delicious choices.

One pound of apples equals four small, three medium or two large or 3 cups of diced, 2-3/4 cups sliced, or 1-1/2 cups grated. Substituting half of the shortening in baked goods with unsweetened applesauce cuts fat. Put peeled, sliced apples into a bowl of water with a tablespoon of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown as you prepare recipes. Drain well before mixing with other ingredients.

Mixing different types of apples together, such as sweeter Braeburns and tart Granny Smiths in a pie creates a lovely contrast in flavors and textures.

To keep your pie filling from falling away from the top crust, use a mixture of apples, some that cook up soft, and some that hold their shape, as well as tart and sweet flavors.

Cortland, Jonathan, Pippin, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady hold their shape. Some that cook down are Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith, and Macintosh.

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When the desire to enjoy some apple desserts, these recipes may be just what you need.

I know apples are delicious, eaten one crisp fresh bite after another, but cooler temperatures and gray skies make me think of getting out my recipes that bring back memories of my grandma who had bushels of apples to use. Grandma knew how to keep the temperature just right in her wood burning range to turn out perfectly baked desserts. My gas oven warms the kitchen and fills the house with the delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon, but in my memory, Grandma’s goodies were always best.

I’m happy when friends offer me some of their apples, just for the picking, but Farmers’ Markets and grocers’ produce aisles provide delicious choices.

One pound of apples equals four small, three medium or two large or 3 cups of diced, 2-3/4 cups sliced, or 1-1/2 cups grated. Substituting half of the shortening in baked goods with unsweetened applesauce cuts fat. Put peeled, sliced apples into a bowl of water with a tablespoon of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown as you prepare recipes. Drain well before mixing with other ingredients.

Mixing different types of apples together, such as sweeter Braeburns and tart Granny Smiths in a pie creates a lovely contrast in flavors and textures.

To keep your pie filling from falling away from the top crust, use a mixture of apples, some that cook up soft, and some that hold their shape, as well as tart and sweet flavors.

Cortland, Jonathan, Pippin, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady hold their shape. Some that cook down are Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith, and Macintosh.

When the desire to enjoy some apple desserts, these recipes may be just what you need.

I know apples are delicious, eaten one crisp fresh bite after another, but cooler temperatures and gray skies make me think of getting out my recipes that bring back memories of my grandma who had bushels of apples to use. Grandma knew how to keep the temperature just right in her wood burning range to turn out perfectly baked desserts. My gas oven warms the kitchen and fills the house with the delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon, but in my memory, Grandma’s goodies were always best.

I’m happy when friends offer me some of their apples, just for the picking, but Farmers’ Markets and grocers’ produce aisles provide delicious choices.

One pound of apples equals four small, three medium or two large or 3 cups of diced, 2-3/4 cups sliced, or 1-1/2 cups grated. Substituting half of the shortening in baked goods with unsweetened applesauce cuts fat. Put peeled, sliced apples into a bowl of water with a tablespoon of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown as you prepare recipes. Drain well before mixing with other ingredients.

Mixing different types of apples together, such as sweeter Braeburns and tart Granny Smiths in a pie creates a lovely contrast in flavors and textures.

To keep your pie filling from falling away from the top crust, use a mixture of apples, some that cook up soft, and some that hold their shape, as well as tart and sweet flavors.

Cortland, Jonathan, Pippin, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady hold their shape. Some that cook down are Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith, and Macintosh.

When the desire to enjoy some apple desserts, these recipes may be just what you need.

I know apples are delicious, eaten one crisp fresh bite after another, but cooler temperatures and gray skies make me think of getting out my recipes that bring back memories of my grandma who had bushels of apples to use. Grandma knew how to keep the temperature just right in her wood burning range to turn out perfectly baked desserts. My gas oven warms the kitchen and fills the house with the delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon, but in my memory, Grandma’s goodies were always best.

I’m happy when friends offer me some of their apples, just for the picking, but Farmers’ Markets and grocers’ produce aisles provide delicious choices.

One pound of apples equals four small, three medium or two large or 3 cups of diced, 2-3/4 cups sliced, or 1-1/2 cups grated. Substituting half of the shortening in baked goods with unsweetened applesauce cuts fat. Put peeled, sliced apples into a bowl of water with a tablespoon of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown as you prepare recipes. Drain well before mixing with other ingredients.

Mixing different types of apples together, such as sweeter Braeburns and tart Granny Smiths in a pie creates a lovely contrast in flavors and textures.

To keep your pie filling from falling away from the top crust, use a mixture of apples, some that cook up soft, and some that hold their shape, as well as tart and sweet flavors.

Cortland, Jonathan, Pippin, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady hold their shape. Some that cook down are Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith, and Macintosh.

When the desire to enjoy some apple desserts, these recipes may be just what you need.

I know apples are delicious, eaten one crisp fresh bite after another, but cooler temperatures and gray skies make me think of getting out my recipes that bring back memories of my grandma who had bushels of apples to use. Grandma knew how to keep the temperature just right in her wood burning range to turn out perfectly baked desserts. My gas oven warms the kitchen and fills the house with the delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon, but in my memory, Grandma’s goodies were always best.

I’m happy when friends offer me some of their apples, just for the picking, but Farmers’ Markets and grocers’ produce aisles provide delicious choices.

One pound of apples equals four small, three medium or two large or 3 cups of diced, 2-3/4 cups sliced, or 1-1/2 cups grated. Substituting half of the shortening in baked goods with unsweetened applesauce cuts fat. Put peeled, sliced apples into a bowl of water with a tablespoon of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown as you prepare recipes. Drain well before mixing with other ingredients.

Mixing different types of apples together, such as sweeter Braeburns and tart Granny Smiths in a pie creates a lovely contrast in flavors and textures.

To keep your pie filling from falling away from the top crust, use a mixture of apples, some that cook up soft, and some that hold their shape, as well as tart and sweet flavors.

Cortland, Jonathan, Pippin, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady hold their shape. Some that cook down are Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith, and Macintosh.

When the desire to enjoy some apple desserts, these recipes may be just what you need.

I know apples are delicious, eaten one crisp fresh bite after another, but cooler temperatures and gray skies make me think of getting out my recipes that bring back memories of my grandma who had bushels of apples to use. Grandma knew how to keep the temperature just right in her wood burning range to turn out perfectly baked desserts. My gas oven warms the kitchen and fills the house with the delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon, but in my memory, Grandma’s goodies were always best.

I’m happy when friends offer me some of their apples, just for the picking, but Farmers’ Markets and grocers’ produce aisles provide delicious choices.

One pound of apples equals four small, three medium or two large or 3 cups of diced, 2-3/4 cups sliced, or 1-1/2 cups grated. Substituting half of the shortening in baked goods with unsweetened applesauce cuts fat. Put peeled, sliced apples into a bowl of water with a tablespoon of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown as you prepare recipes. Drain well before mixing with other ingredients.

Mixing different types of apples together, such as sweeter Braeburns and tart Granny Smiths in a pie creates a lovely contrast in flavors and textures.

To keep your pie filling from falling away from the top crust, use a mixture of apples, some that cook up soft, and some that hold their shape, as well as tart and sweet flavors.

Cortland, Jonathan, Pippin, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady hold their shape. Some that cook down are Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith, and Macintosh.

When the desire to enjoy some apple desserts, these recipes may be just what you need.

I know apples are delicious, eaten one crisp fresh bite after another, but cooler temperatures and gray skies make me think of getting out my recipes that bring back memories of my grandma who had bushels of apples to use. Grandma knew how to keep the temperature just right in her wood burning range to turn out perfectly baked desserts. My gas oven warms the kitchen and fills the house with the delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon, but in my memory, Grandma’s goodies were always best.

I’m happy when friends offer me some of their apples, just for the picking, but Farmers’ Markets and grocers’ produce aisles provide delicious choices.

One pound of apples equals four small, three medium or two large or 3 cups of diced, 2-3/4 cups sliced, or 1-1/2 cups grated. Substituting half of the shortening in baked goods with unsweetened applesauce cuts fat. Put peeled, sliced apples into a bowl of water with a tablespoon of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown as you prepare recipes. Drain well before mixing with other ingredients.

Mixing different types of apples together, such as sweeter Braeburns and tart Granny Smiths in a pie creates a lovely contrast in flavors and textures.

To keep your pie filling from falling away from the top crust, use a mixture of apples, some that cook up soft, and some that hold their shape, as well as tart and sweet flavors.

Cortland, Jonathan, Pippin, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady hold their shape. Some that cook down are Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith, and Macintosh.

When the desire to enjoy some apple desserts, these recipes may be just what you need.

I know apples are delicious, eaten one crisp fresh bite after another, but cooler temperatures and gray skies make me think of getting out my recipes that bring back memories of my grandma who had bushels of apples to use. Grandma knew how to keep the temperature just right in her wood burning range to turn out perfectly baked desserts. My gas oven warms the kitchen and fills the house with the delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon, but in my memory, Grandma’s goodies were always best.

I’m happy when friends offer me some of their apples, just for the picking, but Farmers’ Markets and grocers’ produce aisles provide delicious choices.

One pound of apples equals four small, three medium or two large or 3 cups of diced, 2-3/4 cups sliced, or 1-1/2 cups grated. Substituting half of the shortening in baked goods with unsweetened applesauce cuts fat. Put peeled, sliced apples into a bowl of water with a tablespoon of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown as you prepare recipes. Drain well before mixing with other ingredients.

Mixing different types of apples together, such as sweeter Braeburns and tart Granny Smiths in a pie creates a lovely contrast in flavors and textures.

To keep your pie filling from falling away from the top crust, use a mixture of apples, some that cook up soft, and some that hold their shape, as well as tart and sweet flavors.

Cortland, Jonathan, Pippin, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady hold their shape. Some that cook down are Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith, and Macintosh.

When the desire to enjoy some apple desserts, these recipes may be just what you need.

I know apples are delicious, eaten one crisp fresh bite after another, but cooler temperatures and gray skies make me think of getting out my recipes that bring back memories of my grandma who had bushels of apples to use. Grandma knew how to keep the temperature just right in her wood burning range to turn out perfectly baked desserts. My gas oven warms the kitchen and fills the house with the delicious aroma of apples and cinnamon, but in my memory, Grandma’s goodies were always best.

I’m happy when friends offer me some of their apples, just for the picking, but Farmers’ Markets and grocers’ produce aisles provide delicious choices.

One pound of apples equals four small, three medium or two large or 3 cups of diced, 2-3/4 cups sliced, or 1-1/2 cups grated. Substituting half of the shortening in baked goods with unsweetened applesauce cuts fat. Put peeled, sliced apples into a bowl of water with a tablespoon of lemon juice to keep them from turning brown as you prepare recipes. Drain well before mixing with other ingredients.

Mixing different types of apples together, such as sweeter Braeburns and tart Granny Smiths in a pie creates a lovely contrast in flavors and textures.

To keep your pie filling from falling away from the top crust, use a mixture of apples, some that cook up soft, and some that hold their shape, as well as tart and sweet flavors.

Cortland, Jonathan, Pippin, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady hold their shape. Some that cook down are Braeburn, Gala, Granny Smith, and Macintosh.

When the desire to enjoy some apple desserts, these recipes may be just what you need.