Asparagus: early spring crop | TheFencePost.com

Asparagus: early spring crop

Anna Aughenbaugh
Fort Collins, Colo.

The look on my grandma’s face was one of incredulous disbelief when I asked if I could have a different vegetable for supper. As a four year old, asparagus three times a day had become monotonous. My grandparents lived across the road from the Grange Hall near Waltham, Illinois, where asparagus grew wild along the ditch. As soon as the first shoots showed themselves, Grandpa would begin cutting them for Grandma to cook.

Having no electricity meant there was no way to freeze the abundant crop of asparagus, so for the short growing season, we ate it morning, noon and night. The look I got from Grandma made me realize that to them, nothing compared to the taste of this vegetable that is a spring tonic.

I wish I could walk across the gravel road to that Grange Hall to cut asparagus, now that I can freeze it after enjoying a meal or two.

Instead, I buy it at the grocery store, from February to June, where it has usually been shipped from Mexico, still tasty, but not as deliciously fresh as what Grandma cooked.

Asparagus should have ends that aren’t dried out. Store unwashed asparagus in a ziplock bag in refrigerator for up to four days. Swish the spears vigorously in cool water to remove the dirt. Cut into 2 inch pieces, stopping when the knife meets with resistance near the tough ends.

There are lots of ways to prepare it, but we enjoy having it just steamed for 5 minutes until it is crisp tender; add a tablespoon of butter and sprinkled with salt and pepper. It can be tossed with a tablespoon of oil, placed on a baking sheet, then roasted for 7 minutes at 450˚, grill for 2 minutes per side, microwave, with 1/4 cup water on high 4 minutes, or stir-fry for 4 minutes. Parboiling the spears in 1/3 cup salted water for 3 minutes until most of the water has boiled away, then plunging them into cold water to stop the cooking, then refrigerating, will keep them for a few days. To re-heat the amount you need for a meal, put 1 Tbsp. butter in a skillet and shake it to insure even heating. This is also a good to have asparagus to slice into omelets.

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This versatile vegetable can be eaten raw as an appetizer, added to salads and sandwiches, soup and casseroles. The following recipes may add to your love of this springtime vegetable.

The look on my grandma’s face was one of incredulous disbelief when I asked if I could have a different vegetable for supper. As a four year old, asparagus three times a day had become monotonous. My grandparents lived across the road from the Grange Hall near Waltham, Illinois, where asparagus grew wild along the ditch. As soon as the first shoots showed themselves, Grandpa would begin cutting them for Grandma to cook.

Having no electricity meant there was no way to freeze the abundant crop of asparagus, so for the short growing season, we ate it morning, noon and night. The look I got from Grandma made me realize that to them, nothing compared to the taste of this vegetable that is a spring tonic.

I wish I could walk across the gravel road to that Grange Hall to cut asparagus, now that I can freeze it after enjoying a meal or two.

Instead, I buy it at the grocery store, from February to June, where it has usually been shipped from Mexico, still tasty, but not as deliciously fresh as what Grandma cooked.

Asparagus should have ends that aren’t dried out. Store unwashed asparagus in a ziplock bag in refrigerator for up to four days. Swish the spears vigorously in cool water to remove the dirt. Cut into 2 inch pieces, stopping when the knife meets with resistance near the tough ends.

There are lots of ways to prepare it, but we enjoy having it just steamed for 5 minutes until it is crisp tender; add a tablespoon of butter and sprinkled with salt and pepper. It can be tossed with a tablespoon of oil, placed on a baking sheet, then roasted for 7 minutes at 450˚, grill for 2 minutes per side, microwave, with 1/4 cup water on high 4 minutes, or stir-fry for 4 minutes. Parboiling the spears in 1/3 cup salted water for 3 minutes until most of the water has boiled away, then plunging them into cold water to stop the cooking, then refrigerating, will keep them for a few days. To re-heat the amount you need for a meal, put 1 Tbsp. butter in a skillet and shake it to insure even heating. This is also a good to have asparagus to slice into omelets.

This versatile vegetable can be eaten raw as an appetizer, added to salads and sandwiches, soup and casseroles. The following recipes may add to your love of this springtime vegetable.

The look on my grandma’s face was one of incredulous disbelief when I asked if I could have a different vegetable for supper. As a four year old, asparagus three times a day had become monotonous. My grandparents lived across the road from the Grange Hall near Waltham, Illinois, where asparagus grew wild along the ditch. As soon as the first shoots showed themselves, Grandpa would begin cutting them for Grandma to cook.

Having no electricity meant there was no way to freeze the abundant crop of asparagus, so for the short growing season, we ate it morning, noon and night. The look I got from Grandma made me realize that to them, nothing compared to the taste of this vegetable that is a spring tonic.

I wish I could walk across the gravel road to that Grange Hall to cut asparagus, now that I can freeze it after enjoying a meal or two.

Instead, I buy it at the grocery store, from February to June, where it has usually been shipped from Mexico, still tasty, but not as deliciously fresh as what Grandma cooked.

Asparagus should have ends that aren’t dried out. Store unwashed asparagus in a ziplock bag in refrigerator for up to four days. Swish the spears vigorously in cool water to remove the dirt. Cut into 2 inch pieces, stopping when the knife meets with resistance near the tough ends.

There are lots of ways to prepare it, but we enjoy having it just steamed for 5 minutes until it is crisp tender; add a tablespoon of butter and sprinkled with salt and pepper. It can be tossed with a tablespoon of oil, placed on a baking sheet, then roasted for 7 minutes at 450˚, grill for 2 minutes per side, microwave, with 1/4 cup water on high 4 minutes, or stir-fry for 4 minutes. Parboiling the spears in 1/3 cup salted water for 3 minutes until most of the water has boiled away, then plunging them into cold water to stop the cooking, then refrigerating, will keep them for a few days. To re-heat the amount you need for a meal, put 1 Tbsp. butter in a skillet and shake it to insure even heating. This is also a good to have asparagus to slice into omelets.

This versatile vegetable can be eaten raw as an appetizer, added to salads and sandwiches, soup and casseroles. The following recipes may add to your love of this springtime vegetable.

The look on my grandma’s face was one of incredulous disbelief when I asked if I could have a different vegetable for supper. As a four year old, asparagus three times a day had become monotonous. My grandparents lived across the road from the Grange Hall near Waltham, Illinois, where asparagus grew wild along the ditch. As soon as the first shoots showed themselves, Grandpa would begin cutting them for Grandma to cook.

Having no electricity meant there was no way to freeze the abundant crop of asparagus, so for the short growing season, we ate it morning, noon and night. The look I got from Grandma made me realize that to them, nothing compared to the taste of this vegetable that is a spring tonic.

I wish I could walk across the gravel road to that Grange Hall to cut asparagus, now that I can freeze it after enjoying a meal or two.

Instead, I buy it at the grocery store, from February to June, where it has usually been shipped from Mexico, still tasty, but not as deliciously fresh as what Grandma cooked.

Asparagus should have ends that aren’t dried out. Store unwashed asparagus in a ziplock bag in refrigerator for up to four days. Swish the spears vigorously in cool water to remove the dirt. Cut into 2 inch pieces, stopping when the knife meets with resistance near the tough ends.

There are lots of ways to prepare it, but we enjoy having it just steamed for 5 minutes until it is crisp tender; add a tablespoon of butter and sprinkled with salt and pepper. It can be tossed with a tablespoon of oil, placed on a baking sheet, then roasted for 7 minutes at 450˚, grill for 2 minutes per side, microwave, with 1/4 cup water on high 4 minutes, or stir-fry for 4 minutes. Parboiling the spears in 1/3 cup salted water for 3 minutes until most of the water has boiled away, then plunging them into cold water to stop the cooking, then refrigerating, will keep them for a few days. To re-heat the amount you need for a meal, put 1 Tbsp. butter in a skillet and shake it to insure even heating. This is also a good to have asparagus to slice into omelets.

This versatile vegetable can be eaten raw as an appetizer, added to salads and sandwiches, soup and casseroles. The following recipes may add to your love of this springtime vegetable.

The look on my grandma’s face was one of incredulous disbelief when I asked if I could have a different vegetable for supper. As a four year old, asparagus three times a day had become monotonous. My grandparents lived across the road from the Grange Hall near Waltham, Illinois, where asparagus grew wild along the ditch. As soon as the first shoots showed themselves, Grandpa would begin cutting them for Grandma to cook.

Having no electricity meant there was no way to freeze the abundant crop of asparagus, so for the short growing season, we ate it morning, noon and night. The look I got from Grandma made me realize that to them, nothing compared to the taste of this vegetable that is a spring tonic.

I wish I could walk across the gravel road to that Grange Hall to cut asparagus, now that I can freeze it after enjoying a meal or two.

Instead, I buy it at the grocery store, from February to June, where it has usually been shipped from Mexico, still tasty, but not as deliciously fresh as what Grandma cooked.

Asparagus should have ends that aren’t dried out. Store unwashed asparagus in a ziplock bag in refrigerator for up to four days. Swish the spears vigorously in cool water to remove the dirt. Cut into 2 inch pieces, stopping when the knife meets with resistance near the tough ends.

There are lots of ways to prepare it, but we enjoy having it just steamed for 5 minutes until it is crisp tender; add a tablespoon of butter and sprinkled with salt and pepper. It can be tossed with a tablespoon of oil, placed on a baking sheet, then roasted for 7 minutes at 450˚, grill for 2 minutes per side, microwave, with 1/4 cup water on high 4 minutes, or stir-fry for 4 minutes. Parboiling the spears in 1/3 cup salted water for 3 minutes until most of the water has boiled away, then plunging them into cold water to stop the cooking, then refrigerating, will keep them for a few days. To re-heat the amount you need for a meal, put 1 Tbsp. butter in a skillet and shake it to insure even heating. This is also a good to have asparagus to slice into omelets.

This versatile vegetable can be eaten raw as an appetizer, added to salads and sandwiches, soup and casseroles. The following recipes may add to your love of this springtime vegetable.

The look on my grandma’s face was one of incredulous disbelief when I asked if I could have a different vegetable for supper. As a four year old, asparagus three times a day had become monotonous. My grandparents lived across the road from the Grange Hall near Waltham, Illinois, where asparagus grew wild along the ditch. As soon as the first shoots showed themselves, Grandpa would begin cutting them for Grandma to cook.

Having no electricity meant there was no way to freeze the abundant crop of asparagus, so for the short growing season, we ate it morning, noon and night. The look I got from Grandma made me realize that to them, nothing compared to the taste of this vegetable that is a spring tonic.

I wish I could walk across the gravel road to that Grange Hall to cut asparagus, now that I can freeze it after enjoying a meal or two.

Instead, I buy it at the grocery store, from February to June, where it has usually been shipped from Mexico, still tasty, but not as deliciously fresh as what Grandma cooked.

Asparagus should have ends that aren’t dried out. Store unwashed asparagus in a ziplock bag in refrigerator for up to four days. Swish the spears vigorously in cool water to remove the dirt. Cut into 2 inch pieces, stopping when the knife meets with resistance near the tough ends.

There are lots of ways to prepare it, but we enjoy having it just steamed for 5 minutes until it is crisp tender; add a tablespoon of butter and sprinkled with salt and pepper. It can be tossed with a tablespoon of oil, placed on a baking sheet, then roasted for 7 minutes at 450˚, grill for 2 minutes per side, microwave, with 1/4 cup water on high 4 minutes, or stir-fry for 4 minutes. Parboiling the spears in 1/3 cup salted water for 3 minutes until most of the water has boiled away, then plunging them into cold water to stop the cooking, then refrigerating, will keep them for a few days. To re-heat the amount you need for a meal, put 1 Tbsp. butter in a skillet and shake it to insure even heating. This is also a good to have asparagus to slice into omelets.

This versatile vegetable can be eaten raw as an appetizer, added to salads and sandwiches, soup and casseroles. The following recipes may add to your love of this springtime vegetable.