Barrel racing in the blink of an eye | TheFencePost.com

Barrel racing in the blink of an eye

Barrel Racing is a sport that happens in the blink of an eye. In a basketball arena with the court covered in dirt, as it is at the NFR, a complete run can happen in as little as 14 seconds. In huge arenas like Cheyenne Frontier Days, a run happens at the “leisurely” pace of 18 seconds.

Some barrel racing horses do very well indoors with a small pattern. At the NFR, the horses quickly learn to ‘key’ off the wall to begin their turns. Horses that excel at large open arenas like Frontier Days are really exceptional, as they have nothing but the barrel to focus on while lining up their turns.

Although they may say it in different terms, barrel racers all agree that the high speeds and the g-forces in the turns create a huge adrenalin rush. That and the sense of control that they feel are the main reasons that they love the sport. At the professional level, the riders have years of training and feel no fear when riding their best horses, although they will admit to the fact that there are a lot more things that can go wrong when they are not riding their A-string horses.

Whether the pattern is large or small, details of a run happen far too quickly to see much more than the big picture. It is only with cameras that can fire off 10 frames per second at shutter speeds of 1/8000 of a second can we stop the action to see the details of the power, speed, and fluidity of this amazing partnership between rider and horse.

Barrel Racing is a sport that happens in the blink of an eye. In a basketball arena with the court covered in dirt, as it is at the NFR, a complete run can happen in as little as 14 seconds. In huge arenas like Cheyenne Frontier Days, a run happens at the “leisurely” pace of 18 seconds.

Some barrel racing horses do very well indoors with a small pattern. At the NFR, the horses quickly learn to ‘key’ off the wall to begin their turns. Horses that excel at large open arenas like Frontier Days are really exceptional, as they have nothing but the barrel to focus on while lining up their turns.

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Although they may say it in different terms, barrel racers all agree that the high speeds and the g-forces in the turns create a huge adrenalin rush. That and the sense of control that they feel are the main reasons that they love the sport. At the professional level, the riders have years of training and feel no fear when riding their best horses, although they will admit to the fact that there are a lot more things that can go wrong when they are not riding their A-string horses.

Whether the pattern is large or small, details of a run happen far too quickly to see much more than the big picture. It is only with cameras that can fire off 10 frames per second at shutter speeds of 1/8000 of a second can we stop the action to see the details of the power, speed, and fluidity of this amazing partnership between rider and horse.

Barrel Racing is a sport that happens in the blink of an eye. In a basketball arena with the court covered in dirt, as it is at the NFR, a complete run can happen in as little as 14 seconds. In huge arenas like Cheyenne Frontier Days, a run happens at the “leisurely” pace of 18 seconds.

Some barrel racing horses do very well indoors with a small pattern. At the NFR, the horses quickly learn to ‘key’ off the wall to begin their turns. Horses that excel at large open arenas like Frontier Days are really exceptional, as they have nothing but the barrel to focus on while lining up their turns.

Although they may say it in different terms, barrel racers all agree that the high speeds and the g-forces in the turns create a huge adrenalin rush. That and the sense of control that they feel are the main reasons that they love the sport. At the professional level, the riders have years of training and feel no fear when riding their best horses, although they will admit to the fact that there are a lot more things that can go wrong when they are not riding their A-string horses.

Whether the pattern is large or small, details of a run happen far too quickly to see much more than the big picture. It is only with cameras that can fire off 10 frames per second at shutter speeds of 1/8000 of a second can we stop the action to see the details of the power, speed, and fluidity of this amazing partnership between rider and horse.

Barrel Racing is a sport that happens in the blink of an eye. In a basketball arena with the court covered in dirt, as it is at the NFR, a complete run can happen in as little as 14 seconds. In huge arenas like Cheyenne Frontier Days, a run happens at the “leisurely” pace of 18 seconds.

Some barrel racing horses do very well indoors with a small pattern. At the NFR, the horses quickly learn to ‘key’ off the wall to begin their turns. Horses that excel at large open arenas like Frontier Days are really exceptional, as they have nothing but the barrel to focus on while lining up their turns.

Although they may say it in different terms, barrel racers all agree that the high speeds and the g-forces in the turns create a huge adrenalin rush. That and the sense of control that they feel are the main reasons that they love the sport. At the professional level, the riders have years of training and feel no fear when riding their best horses, although they will admit to the fact that there are a lot more things that can go wrong when they are not riding their A-string horses.

Whether the pattern is large or small, details of a run happen far too quickly to see much more than the big picture. It is only with cameras that can fire off 10 frames per second at shutter speeds of 1/8000 of a second can we stop the action to see the details of the power, speed, and fluidity of this amazing partnership between rider and horse.

Barrel Racing is a sport that happens in the blink of an eye. In a basketball arena with the court covered in dirt, as it is at the NFR, a complete run can happen in as little as 14 seconds. In huge arenas like Cheyenne Frontier Days, a run happens at the “leisurely” pace of 18 seconds.

Some barrel racing horses do very well indoors with a small pattern. At the NFR, the horses quickly learn to ‘key’ off the wall to begin their turns. Horses that excel at large open arenas like Frontier Days are really exceptional, as they have nothing but the barrel to focus on while lining up their turns.

Although they may say it in different terms, barrel racers all agree that the high speeds and the g-forces in the turns create a huge adrenalin rush. That and the sense of control that they feel are the main reasons that they love the sport. At the professional level, the riders have years of training and feel no fear when riding their best horses, although they will admit to the fact that there are a lot more things that can go wrong when they are not riding their A-string horses.

Whether the pattern is large or small, details of a run happen far too quickly to see much more than the big picture. It is only with cameras that can fire off 10 frames per second at shutter speeds of 1/8000 of a second can we stop the action to see the details of the power, speed, and fluidity of this amazing partnership between rider and horse.

Barrel Racing is a sport that happens in the blink of an eye. In a basketball arena with the court covered in dirt, as it is at the NFR, a complete run can happen in as little as 14 seconds. In huge arenas like Cheyenne Frontier Days, a run happens at the “leisurely” pace of 18 seconds.

Some barrel racing horses do very well indoors with a small pattern. At the NFR, the horses quickly learn to ‘key’ off the wall to begin their turns. Horses that excel at large open arenas like Frontier Days are really exceptional, as they have nothing but the barrel to focus on while lining up their turns.

Although they may say it in different terms, barrel racers all agree that the high speeds and the g-forces in the turns create a huge adrenalin rush. That and the sense of control that they feel are the main reasons that they love the sport. At the professional level, the riders have years of training and feel no fear when riding their best horses, although they will admit to the fact that there are a lot more things that can go wrong when they are not riding their A-string horses.

Whether the pattern is large or small, details of a run happen far too quickly to see much more than the big picture. It is only with cameras that can fire off 10 frames per second at shutter speeds of 1/8000 of a second can we stop the action to see the details of the power, speed, and fluidity of this amazing partnership between rider and horse.