Bauer’s High Country Horsemanship School continues nearly 30 years | TheFencePost.com

Bauer’s High Country Horsemanship School continues nearly 30 years

Robert Allen
Summit Daily News

Photo courtesy of Summit Daily/Mark FoxLynn Bauer works with Scribbles and 1-month-old foal, Chantilly Lace, in the pasture of Ptarmigan Ranch.

Lynn Bauer traveled America for six months in a Volkswagen camper van before stopping in Summit County, Colo., with her husband, their 3-year-old son and a 50 pound dog.

It was 1971, and they had no jobs, money or place to live. Nearly 40 years later, Bauer has a barn full of horses with a school spanning generations of both equine and people.

“She has raised so many kids; she teaches them how to get along and share with others and care about others,” said Ellen French, a local friend. “She is just the most wonderful person.”

Bauer’s High Country Horsemanship School is just north of Interstate 70 at Dillon Valley. Most of the clients come by word of mouth.

Bauer said she teaches a range of ages how to ride and care for horses, but she most enjoys working with young kids.

“They’re just so excited about what they’re doing,” she said. “The smiles are huge, and they want to hang out all the time and shovel manure.”

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The school usually has between 20 and 30 students, with numbers dwindling during winter months.

It may never have been started if Bauer had settled for Aspen the summer of ’71. The family had first stopped in Summit County on the way to Aspen, where they were considering settling.

“We spent about two hours in Aspen and came back here,” she said, adding that the locals in Summit made them feel more of a sense of community.

“The first people we met here were Max and Edna Dercum. Edna said, ‘Oh, you need to come here. We need good people,'” Bauer said.

The first couple months, she and her husband at the time had no job or place to live; they spent the first couple months in a campground on Swan Mountain Road.

Soon they got into the real-estate business – at a time when a license wasn’t necessary.

Bauer said her ex-husband “went to a model home and waited for somebody to come in … so we could have money.”

But the timing was great, and “real estate started to take off,” she said.

Having had a passion for horses since childhood, she got a horse named Princess. Bauer’s first marriage ended in divorce, and when her son Rick Jones was about 16, he wanted to visit his father in California. “I said, ‘You’re not going,'” she said, adding that she told her son he would need money for round-trip transportation.

By that time they had about four horses. She and Rick knew of a young girl interested in learning to ride, so the mother and son worked together toward what would become the school.

She agreed to split the money with Rick until he’d saved enough for his trip. “Rick and I started that just as a fluke,” she said.

Lynn Bauer traveled America for six months in a Volkswagen camper van before stopping in Summit County, Colo., with her husband, their 3-year-old son and a 50 pound dog.

It was 1971, and they had no jobs, money or place to live. Nearly 40 years later, Bauer has a barn full of horses with a school spanning generations of both equine and people.

“She has raised so many kids; she teaches them how to get along and share with others and care about others,” said Ellen French, a local friend. “She is just the most wonderful person.”

Bauer’s High Country Horsemanship School is just north of Interstate 70 at Dillon Valley. Most of the clients come by word of mouth.

Bauer said she teaches a range of ages how to ride and care for horses, but she most enjoys working with young kids.

“They’re just so excited about what they’re doing,” she said. “The smiles are huge, and they want to hang out all the time and shovel manure.”

The school usually has between 20 and 30 students, with numbers dwindling during winter months.

It may never have been started if Bauer had settled for Aspen the summer of ’71. The family had first stopped in Summit County on the way to Aspen, where they were considering settling.

“We spent about two hours in Aspen and came back here,” she said, adding that the locals in Summit made them feel more of a sense of community.

“The first people we met here were Max and Edna Dercum. Edna said, ‘Oh, you need to come here. We need good people,'” Bauer said.

The first couple months, she and her husband at the time had no job or place to live; they spent the first couple months in a campground on Swan Mountain Road.

Soon they got into the real-estate business – at a time when a license wasn’t necessary.

Bauer said her ex-husband “went to a model home and waited for somebody to come in … so we could have money.”

But the timing was great, and “real estate started to take off,” she said.

Having had a passion for horses since childhood, she got a horse named Princess. Bauer’s first marriage ended in divorce, and when her son Rick Jones was about 16, he wanted to visit his father in California. “I said, ‘You’re not going,'” she said, adding that she told her son he would need money for round-trip transportation.

By that time they had about four horses. She and Rick knew of a young girl interested in learning to ride, so the mother and son worked together toward what would become the school.

She agreed to split the money with Rick until he’d saved enough for his trip. “Rick and I started that just as a fluke,” she said.

Lynn Bauer traveled America for six months in a Volkswagen camper van before stopping in Summit County, Colo., with her husband, their 3-year-old son and a 50 pound dog.

It was 1971, and they had no jobs, money or place to live. Nearly 40 years later, Bauer has a barn full of horses with a school spanning generations of both equine and people.

“She has raised so many kids; she teaches them how to get along and share with others and care about others,” said Ellen French, a local friend. “She is just the most wonderful person.”

Bauer’s High Country Horsemanship School is just north of Interstate 70 at Dillon Valley. Most of the clients come by word of mouth.

Bauer said she teaches a range of ages how to ride and care for horses, but she most enjoys working with young kids.

“They’re just so excited about what they’re doing,” she said. “The smiles are huge, and they want to hang out all the time and shovel manure.”

The school usually has between 20 and 30 students, with numbers dwindling during winter months.

It may never have been started if Bauer had settled for Aspen the summer of ’71. The family had first stopped in Summit County on the way to Aspen, where they were considering settling.

“We spent about two hours in Aspen and came back here,” she said, adding that the locals in Summit made them feel more of a sense of community.

“The first people we met here were Max and Edna Dercum. Edna said, ‘Oh, you need to come here. We need good people,'” Bauer said.

The first couple months, she and her husband at the time had no job or place to live; they spent the first couple months in a campground on Swan Mountain Road.

Soon they got into the real-estate business – at a time when a license wasn’t necessary.

Bauer said her ex-husband “went to a model home and waited for somebody to come in … so we could have money.”

But the timing was great, and “real estate started to take off,” she said.

Having had a passion for horses since childhood, she got a horse named Princess. Bauer’s first marriage ended in divorce, and when her son Rick Jones was about 16, he wanted to visit his father in California. “I said, ‘You’re not going,'” she said, adding that she told her son he would need money for round-trip transportation.

By that time they had about four horses. She and Rick knew of a young girl interested in learning to ride, so the mother and son worked together toward what would become the school.

She agreed to split the money with Rick until he’d saved enough for his trip. “Rick and I started that just as a fluke,” she said.