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Bear Mountain Angus relocate their Registered Angus and Charolais Cowherd

Gayle Smith
Gering, Neb.
Courtesy PhotoBrian and Tiffany Stoller select cattle that have balanced EPDs, along with a good phenotype, including soundness, volume and rib shape, easy fleshing, growth, muscle, and good mothering ability including good udders.

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It is not easy moving an entire ranch across two states, but Palisade, Neb., ranchers Brian and Tiffany Stoller are living proof that it is possible.

The couple relocated their ranch, Bear Mountain Angus, from Melba, Idaho, to southwest Nebraska after the ranch they were leasing was sold for urban development. The move to Nebraska has brought new opportunities and friendships for the couple, who feel the state is a great place to raise cattle.

Before they made the move, most of the herd was sold. Only 250 of their top registered cattle made the journey to Nebraska. Since coming to the state, they are working to develop new customers for their registered Angus and Charolais seedstock business, in addition to seeking out opportunities to expand their ultrasound business.

Although he could have relocated anywhere, Brian was attracted to the ranch west of Palisade because he thought it had great potential. “After looking at a few ranches, it looked like a great location. There are lots of cattle in the area, it is along a major highway, and has very nice people in the area,” he says.

The Nebraska ranch is similar to the operation they had in Idaho – with fewer cows. “The genetics and the focus are still the same,” Brian says. “We focus on quality with performance. The biggest difference between us and other operations in Nebraska is our feeding program. Our bulls are performance tested on an all-forage, non-starch diet which will increase longevity, and decrease feet and leg problems. Their digestive system does not have to adjust from a starch diet to a forage diet.”

Since settling in to the property in 2008, the biggest challenge has been rebuilding their customer base. “Our goal is to sell high-quality livestock, and stand behind them,” Brian explains. “Thankfully, people have been very receptive to us and our program.”

The couple have started to build their reputation through careful cattle selection. “We select cattle for quality and performance,” Brian explains. “We look for animals that have balanced expected progeny differences (EPDs), along with good phenotype including soundness, volume and rib shape, easy fleshing, growth, muscle, and good mothering ability including good udders.”

The couple currently market their registered seedstock through two production sales each year. The bull sale is held the last Thursday in February, and the offering consists of two-year-old, coming two-year-old, and yearling Charolais and Angus bulls. The female production sale is held the first Saturday in October and consists of a mixture of proven cows, bred heifers and show heifers.

Looking to the future, Brian said he hopes to increase the number of bulls he has to offer during the annual bull sale. In addition, he also hopes to give more back to his customers by developing a branded beef program that customers could use to market their calves.

It is not easy moving an entire ranch across two states, but Palisade, Neb., ranchers Brian and Tiffany Stoller are living proof that it is possible.

The couple relocated their ranch, Bear Mountain Angus, from Melba, Idaho, to southwest Nebraska after the ranch they were leasing was sold for urban development. The move to Nebraska has brought new opportunities and friendships for the couple, who feel the state is a great place to raise cattle.

Before they made the move, most of the herd was sold. Only 250 of their top registered cattle made the journey to Nebraska. Since coming to the state, they are working to develop new customers for their registered Angus and Charolais seedstock business, in addition to seeking out opportunities to expand their ultrasound business.

Although he could have relocated anywhere, Brian was attracted to the ranch west of Palisade because he thought it had great potential. “After looking at a few ranches, it looked like a great location. There are lots of cattle in the area, it is along a major highway, and has very nice people in the area,” he says.

The Nebraska ranch is similar to the operation they had in Idaho – with fewer cows. “The genetics and the focus are still the same,” Brian says. “We focus on quality with performance. The biggest difference between us and other operations in Nebraska is our feeding program. Our bulls are performance tested on an all-forage, non-starch diet which will increase longevity, and decrease feet and leg problems. Their digestive system does not have to adjust from a starch diet to a forage diet.”

Since settling in to the property in 2008, the biggest challenge has been rebuilding their customer base. “Our goal is to sell high-quality livestock, and stand behind them,” Brian explains. “Thankfully, people have been very receptive to us and our program.”

The couple have started to build their reputation through careful cattle selection. “We select cattle for quality and performance,” Brian explains. “We look for animals that have balanced expected progeny differences (EPDs), along with good phenotype including soundness, volume and rib shape, easy fleshing, growth, muscle, and good mothering ability including good udders.”

The couple currently market their registered seedstock through two production sales each year. The bull sale is held the last Thursday in February, and the offering consists of two-year-old, coming two-year-old, and yearling Charolais and Angus bulls. The female production sale is held the first Saturday in October and consists of a mixture of proven cows, bred heifers and show heifers.

Looking to the future, Brian said he hopes to increase the number of bulls he has to offer during the annual bull sale. In addition, he also hopes to give more back to his customers by developing a branded beef program that customers could use to market their calves.


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