Billy the Kid goes to Florida | TheFencePost.com

Billy the Kid goes to Florida

The iconic Billy the Kid tintype has a new home in Palm Beach, Fla. The famous and only authenticated photograph of Billy the Kid was the star of the 22nd Annual Brian Label Old West Show and Auction. The one 130 year old photograph has belonged to the Upham family of California, who have only allowed a brief public viewing.

Bob Boze Bell, the Executive Editor of True West Magazine, talked to the Upham’s and said, “The family didn’t want any publicity. They are very private people. They feel that they have had it long enough. It is a huge responsibility to own this and they are normal people with normal lives and they say it’s time to give it to someone else.”

An underlying source of tension as the lot number of the tintype drew closer, was the fact that there were a number of foreign buyers on the phones and online, and no one wanted to see this piece of American history leave the United States. Boze Bell of True West Magazine was very candid when he spoke of that, “One of our biggest fears is that it will leave the U.S. Three or four of the bidders are foreigners, and there’s nothing against that, it’s just that this is an icon of the American West and we would hate to see it leave this country.”

Brian Label of Old West Auction was more positive, “I really think it will stay here and I think that it belongs here and people will make a concentrated effort to make sure that happens.”

The bidding was spirited and went from the opening bid of $300,000 to over a million in about 30 seconds. Then the bidding really got serious as an unnamed oil man from New Mexico and Florida billionaire, Edward Koch went at it. The oilman would not advance his $1.7 million dollar bid, “I was serious about my bidding, but $1.7 was my ceiling,” he said. When the dust settled, Edward Koch owned the most famous photograph of the American West for his winning $2.3 million dollar bid, which includes the 15 percent buyers premium.

When the bidding was over, the normally reserved auction crowd jumped to their feet and exploded with cheers and applause. They crowded around Koch to shake hands and offer congratulations. As to what Edward Koch will do with the famous photograph, “I haven’t though it through yet. I think I’ll display it for a little bit in a few small museums, and then I’m just going to enjoy it.”

Recommended Stories For You

Koch is no stranger to collecting items from the American West. He has what may be the finest collection in private hands of works by Frederick Remington and Charles Russell. Also in his collection is General Custer’s hunting rifle and the pistol that killed Jesse James. He also owns guns belonging to Batt Masterson and Tom Horn. Recent additions to his collection are the bead belt and breastplate that Sitting Bull wore at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Koch said that he knew he was going to seriously bid on the tintype, “When I first saw it. When I found out it was being offered, I wanted it.”

The Billy the Kid tintype was definitely the star of Brian Label’s Old West Auction, but there were 429 other lots of western memorabilia that bidders were excited to take home. Of special note was California Vaquero, an exceptional watercolor by Edward Borein, and a magnificent pair of parade spurs by one of the most famous and collectable silversmiths, Edward H. Bohlin. Bohlin sold his parade spurs to movie stars and celebrities like Will Rogers, Tom Mix, Roy Rogers, Hopalong Cassidy and Gene Autry in the 1920-1970s.

The move from Cody, Wyo., to Denver, Colo., has been a good one for the Old West Auction. “We love Cody. The people are fantastic” said Label, “but we just outgrew Cody. We just turned into a different kind of event.” Label was very excited about how the sale of the Billy the Kid photo went. “I think it’s fantastic. It’s great that it had that much interest and I think it’s great that it is staying in this country and is going to somebody that will preserve it and take care of it.”

The iconic Billy the Kid tintype has a new home in Palm Beach, Fla. The famous and only authenticated photograph of Billy the Kid was the star of the 22nd Annual Brian Label Old West Show and Auction. The one 130 year old photograph has belonged to the Upham family of California, who have only allowed a brief public viewing.

Bob Boze Bell, the Executive Editor of True West Magazine, talked to the Upham’s and said, “The family didn’t want any publicity. They are very private people. They feel that they have had it long enough. It is a huge responsibility to own this and they are normal people with normal lives and they say it’s time to give it to someone else.”

An underlying source of tension as the lot number of the tintype drew closer, was the fact that there were a number of foreign buyers on the phones and online, and no one wanted to see this piece of American history leave the United States. Boze Bell of True West Magazine was very candid when he spoke of that, “One of our biggest fears is that it will leave the U.S. Three or four of the bidders are foreigners, and there’s nothing against that, it’s just that this is an icon of the American West and we would hate to see it leave this country.”

Brian Label of Old West Auction was more positive, “I really think it will stay here and I think that it belongs here and people will make a concentrated effort to make sure that happens.”

The bidding was spirited and went from the opening bid of $300,000 to over a million in about 30 seconds. Then the bidding really got serious as an unnamed oil man from New Mexico and Florida billionaire, Edward Koch went at it. The oilman would not advance his $1.7 million dollar bid, “I was serious about my bidding, but $1.7 was my ceiling,” he said. When the dust settled, Edward Koch owned the most famous photograph of the American West for his winning $2.3 million dollar bid, which includes the 15 percent buyers premium.

When the bidding was over, the normally reserved auction crowd jumped to their feet and exploded with cheers and applause. They crowded around Koch to shake hands and offer congratulations. As to what Edward Koch will do with the famous photograph, “I haven’t though it through yet. I think I’ll display it for a little bit in a few small museums, and then I’m just going to enjoy it.”

Koch is no stranger to collecting items from the American West. He has what may be the finest collection in private hands of works by Frederick Remington and Charles Russell. Also in his collection is General Custer’s hunting rifle and the pistol that killed Jesse James. He also owns guns belonging to Batt Masterson and Tom Horn. Recent additions to his collection are the bead belt and breastplate that Sitting Bull wore at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Koch said that he knew he was going to seriously bid on the tintype, “When I first saw it. When I found out it was being offered, I wanted it.”

The Billy the Kid tintype was definitely the star of Brian Label’s Old West Auction, but there were 429 other lots of western memorabilia that bidders were excited to take home. Of special note was California Vaquero, an exceptional watercolor by Edward Borein, and a magnificent pair of parade spurs by one of the most famous and collectable silversmiths, Edward H. Bohlin. Bohlin sold his parade spurs to movie stars and celebrities like Will Rogers, Tom Mix, Roy Rogers, Hopalong Cassidy and Gene Autry in the 1920-1970s.

The move from Cody, Wyo., to Denver, Colo., has been a good one for the Old West Auction. “We love Cody. The people are fantastic” said Label, “but we just outgrew Cody. We just turned into a different kind of event.” Label was very excited about how the sale of the Billy the Kid photo went. “I think it’s fantastic. It’s great that it had that much interest and I think it’s great that it is staying in this country and is going to somebody that will preserve it and take care of it.”

The iconic Billy the Kid tintype has a new home in Palm Beach, Fla. The famous and only authenticated photograph of Billy the Kid was the star of the 22nd Annual Brian Label Old West Show and Auction. The one 130 year old photograph has belonged to the Upham family of California, who have only allowed a brief public viewing.

Bob Boze Bell, the Executive Editor of True West Magazine, talked to the Upham’s and said, “The family didn’t want any publicity. They are very private people. They feel that they have had it long enough. It is a huge responsibility to own this and they are normal people with normal lives and they say it’s time to give it to someone else.”

An underlying source of tension as the lot number of the tintype drew closer, was the fact that there were a number of foreign buyers on the phones and online, and no one wanted to see this piece of American history leave the United States. Boze Bell of True West Magazine was very candid when he spoke of that, “One of our biggest fears is that it will leave the U.S. Three or four of the bidders are foreigners, and there’s nothing against that, it’s just that this is an icon of the American West and we would hate to see it leave this country.”

Brian Label of Old West Auction was more positive, “I really think it will stay here and I think that it belongs here and people will make a concentrated effort to make sure that happens.”

The bidding was spirited and went from the opening bid of $300,000 to over a million in about 30 seconds. Then the bidding really got serious as an unnamed oil man from New Mexico and Florida billionaire, Edward Koch went at it. The oilman would not advance his $1.7 million dollar bid, “I was serious about my bidding, but $1.7 was my ceiling,” he said. When the dust settled, Edward Koch owned the most famous photograph of the American West for his winning $2.3 million dollar bid, which includes the 15 percent buyers premium.

When the bidding was over, the normally reserved auction crowd jumped to their feet and exploded with cheers and applause. They crowded around Koch to shake hands and offer congratulations. As to what Edward Koch will do with the famous photograph, “I haven’t though it through yet. I think I’ll display it for a little bit in a few small museums, and then I’m just going to enjoy it.”

Koch is no stranger to collecting items from the American West. He has what may be the finest collection in private hands of works by Frederick Remington and Charles Russell. Also in his collection is General Custer’s hunting rifle and the pistol that killed Jesse James. He also owns guns belonging to Batt Masterson and Tom Horn. Recent additions to his collection are the bead belt and breastplate that Sitting Bull wore at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Koch said that he knew he was going to seriously bid on the tintype, “When I first saw it. When I found out it was being offered, I wanted it.”

The Billy the Kid tintype was definitely the star of Brian Label’s Old West Auction, but there were 429 other lots of western memorabilia that bidders were excited to take home. Of special note was California Vaquero, an exceptional watercolor by Edward Borein, and a magnificent pair of parade spurs by one of the most famous and collectable silversmiths, Edward H. Bohlin. Bohlin sold his parade spurs to movie stars and celebrities like Will Rogers, Tom Mix, Roy Rogers, Hopalong Cassidy and Gene Autry in the 1920-1970s.

The move from Cody, Wyo., to Denver, Colo., has been a good one for the Old West Auction. “We love Cody. The people are fantastic” said Label, “but we just outgrew Cody. We just turned into a different kind of event.” Label was very excited about how the sale of the Billy the Kid photo went. “I think it’s fantastic. It’s great that it had that much interest and I think it’s great that it is staying in this country and is going to somebody that will preserve it and take care of it.”

The iconic Billy the Kid tintype has a new home in Palm Beach, Fla. The famous and only authenticated photograph of Billy the Kid was the star of the 22nd Annual Brian Label Old West Show and Auction. The one 130 year old photograph has belonged to the Upham family of California, who have only allowed a brief public viewing.

Bob Boze Bell, the Executive Editor of True West Magazine, talked to the Upham’s and said, “The family didn’t want any publicity. They are very private people. They feel that they have had it long enough. It is a huge responsibility to own this and they are normal people with normal lives and they say it’s time to give it to someone else.”

An underlying source of tension as the lot number of the tintype drew closer, was the fact that there were a number of foreign buyers on the phones and online, and no one wanted to see this piece of American history leave the United States. Boze Bell of True West Magazine was very candid when he spoke of that, “One of our biggest fears is that it will leave the U.S. Three or four of the bidders are foreigners, and there’s nothing against that, it’s just that this is an icon of the American West and we would hate to see it leave this country.”

Brian Label of Old West Auction was more positive, “I really think it will stay here and I think that it belongs here and people will make a concentrated effort to make sure that happens.”

The bidding was spirited and went from the opening bid of $300,000 to over a million in about 30 seconds. Then the bidding really got serious as an unnamed oil man from New Mexico and Florida billionaire, Edward Koch went at it. The oilman would not advance his $1.7 million dollar bid, “I was serious about my bidding, but $1.7 was my ceiling,” he said. When the dust settled, Edward Koch owned the most famous photograph of the American West for his winning $2.3 million dollar bid, which includes the 15 percent buyers premium.

When the bidding was over, the normally reserved auction crowd jumped to their feet and exploded with cheers and applause. They crowded around Koch to shake hands and offer congratulations. As to what Edward Koch will do with the famous photograph, “I haven’t though it through yet. I think I’ll display it for a little bit in a few small museums, and then I’m just going to enjoy it.”

Koch is no stranger to collecting items from the American West. He has what may be the finest collection in private hands of works by Frederick Remington and Charles Russell. Also in his collection is General Custer’s hunting rifle and the pistol that killed Jesse James. He also owns guns belonging to Batt Masterson and Tom Horn. Recent additions to his collection are the bead belt and breastplate that Sitting Bull wore at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Koch said that he knew he was going to seriously bid on the tintype, “When I first saw it. When I found out it was being offered, I wanted it.”

The Billy the Kid tintype was definitely the star of Brian Label’s Old West Auction, but there were 429 other lots of western memorabilia that bidders were excited to take home. Of special note was California Vaquero, an exceptional watercolor by Edward Borein, and a magnificent pair of parade spurs by one of the most famous and collectable silversmiths, Edward H. Bohlin. Bohlin sold his parade spurs to movie stars and celebrities like Will Rogers, Tom Mix, Roy Rogers, Hopalong Cassidy and Gene Autry in the 1920-1970s.

The move from Cody, Wyo., to Denver, Colo., has been a good one for the Old West Auction. “We love Cody. The people are fantastic” said Label, “but we just outgrew Cody. We just turned into a different kind of event.” Label was very excited about how the sale of the Billy the Kid photo went. “I think it’s fantastic. It’s great that it had that much interest and I think it’s great that it is staying in this country and is going to somebody that will preserve it and take care of it.”

The iconic Billy the Kid tintype has a new home in Palm Beach, Fla. The famous and only authenticated photograph of Billy the Kid was the star of the 22nd Annual Brian Label Old West Show and Auction. The one 130 year old photograph has belonged to the Upham family of California, who have only allowed a brief public viewing.

Bob Boze Bell, the Executive Editor of True West Magazine, talked to the Upham’s and said, “The family didn’t want any publicity. They are very private people. They feel that they have had it long enough. It is a huge responsibility to own this and they are normal people with normal lives and they say it’s time to give it to someone else.”

An underlying source of tension as the lot number of the tintype drew closer, was the fact that there were a number of foreign buyers on the phones and online, and no one wanted to see this piece of American history leave the United States. Boze Bell of True West Magazine was very candid when he spoke of that, “One of our biggest fears is that it will leave the U.S. Three or four of the bidders are foreigners, and there’s nothing against that, it’s just that this is an icon of the American West and we would hate to see it leave this country.”

Brian Label of Old West Auction was more positive, “I really think it will stay here and I think that it belongs here and people will make a concentrated effort to make sure that happens.”

The bidding was spirited and went from the opening bid of $300,000 to over a million in about 30 seconds. Then the bidding really got serious as an unnamed oil man from New Mexico and Florida billionaire, Edward Koch went at it. The oilman would not advance his $1.7 million dollar bid, “I was serious about my bidding, but $1.7 was my ceiling,” he said. When the dust settled, Edward Koch owned the most famous photograph of the American West for his winning $2.3 million dollar bid, which includes the 15 percent buyers premium.

When the bidding was over, the normally reserved auction crowd jumped to their feet and exploded with cheers and applause. They crowded around Koch to shake hands and offer congratulations. As to what Edward Koch will do with the famous photograph, “I haven’t though it through yet. I think I’ll display it for a little bit in a few small museums, and then I’m just going to enjoy it.”

Koch is no stranger to collecting items from the American West. He has what may be the finest collection in private hands of works by Frederick Remington and Charles Russell. Also in his collection is General Custer’s hunting rifle and the pistol that killed Jesse James. He also owns guns belonging to Batt Masterson and Tom Horn. Recent additions to his collection are the bead belt and breastplate that Sitting Bull wore at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Koch said that he knew he was going to seriously bid on the tintype, “When I first saw it. When I found out it was being offered, I wanted it.”

The Billy the Kid tintype was definitely the star of Brian Label’s Old West Auction, but there were 429 other lots of western memorabilia that bidders were excited to take home. Of special note was California Vaquero, an exceptional watercolor by Edward Borein, and a magnificent pair of parade spurs by one of the most famous and collectable silversmiths, Edward H. Bohlin. Bohlin sold his parade spurs to movie stars and celebrities like Will Rogers, Tom Mix, Roy Rogers, Hopalong Cassidy and Gene Autry in the 1920-1970s.

The move from Cody, Wyo., to Denver, Colo., has been a good one for the Old West Auction. “We love Cody. The people are fantastic” said Label, “but we just outgrew Cody. We just turned into a different kind of event.” Label was very excited about how the sale of the Billy the Kid photo went. “I think it’s fantastic. It’s great that it had that much interest and I think it’s great that it is staying in this country and is going to somebody that will preserve it and take care of it.”