CALF Harvest Days Festival | TheFencePost.com

CALF Harvest Days Festival

A restored 1954 Oliver tractor took happy suburban families for hayrides throughout the day at the festival.

The Colorado Agricultural Leadership Foundation (CALF) hosted its annual Harvest Days festival on October 15, at the historic Lowell Ranch near Castle Rock, Colo., and the pleasure matched the perfect weather for all the families taking part. With a roster of agriculture-related activities ranging from livestock pens to fresh produce, hayrides, a pumpkin patch and plenty of antique power equipment, the CALF sponsored event was as much fun as it was educational for over 1,000 people spending a Saturday at the festival.

Located on 133-acres a short distance south of the town of Castle Rock, Colo., those in attendance included many suburban families giving their children a first taste of the agricultural lifestyle, as well as discovering the culture for themselves. That fact was not lost on Brooke Fox, CALF President/CEO since the fall of 2009. Answering questions during the festival, Fox (who was raised on a ranch and has a passion for continuing the culture) was enthusiastic about the positive turnout as well as the suburban demographic.

“I love it,” said Fox about seeing all the families with children interested in attendance. “That’s what this is all about. Just look at all the people around the animals,” she continued, motioning toward livestock pens holding goats, sheep, pigs, a cow and a llama, all surrounded by curious children. “When (Harvest Days) first started five years ago, it was really the Douglas County ranch folks coming,” she described of the first event hosting a total of 150 people. “But it has really transitioned to suburbia, which is exactly what we want to do. We don’t want to preach to the choir,” she added with conviction. “We want to get that (agricultural) message out to everyone.”

Others helping out at the event appreciated the suburban turnout,

as well.

“The most important thing is for (everyone attending) to know about what it is,” said Wayne “Opie” Elmore of Castle Rock, one of many volunteer participants who brought antique power equipment and old-fashioned farm tools for display and hands-on interaction in an area near the Lowell Ranch’s historic house and barn. “(You get to) find out what your great-grandfather had to do to get through the day. A lot of kids don’t know what it takes to put food on the table. Kids learning about the farm is what this is all about.”

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To a background symphony of numerous antique hit-and-miss motors, Elmore showed off a belt-powered corn grinder attached to an old John Deere tractor as well as a 1913 manual corn sheller that was a magnet for kids and parents that day. Every young boy or girl walking by just had to take a turn cranking the sheller and watching how dried corn was removed from the cob about 100 years ago. Such enthusiasm from children attending the festival was a main reason why volunteers had such a good time.

“I love this event,” stated Sara Warren of Franktown, Colo., an Assistant Organization Leader for the Hoof Over Heels 4-H Club. Warren was there to spread the word regarding the upcoming County Fair 4-H season to kids who might be interested in showing and/or parents who might be interested in having their kids show. “It gets the kids getting used to agriculture (and) I love seeing the kids around the animals,” she added. “It opens up their eyes a lot. Maybe they can get their parents to buy one for them,” finished Warren with a laugh.

Between shelling corn, grinding corn, riding behind a carriage or a vintage tractor and seeing livestock up close and personal, all the children at the event had a great time. That was good for both organizers and parents.

“It seemed like a lot of fun and something to do on a nice fall day,” said Shannon of Castle Rock, a mother attending with her 5-year-old daughter, Abbey. Although Abbey was shy, she finally admitted one of her favorite parts of the day was petting the pigs, because they were “soft.” While Abbey continued watching the pigs, her mother said her daughter also enjoyed doing crafts and getting her face painted.

Although there was a variety of family-oriented activities throughout the venue – including sack races, stick horses, a pumpkin patch and hayrides – each one had a distinct rural feel, which was by design.

“This is an agricultural festival (and) it’s not meant to be a carnival,” explained Fox. “We’re not going to have jumpy houses (or things like that). We want it to be a place where people can connect into agriculture; to see the people who are producing their food and get a little better understanding of where their food comes from. That’s what it’s about.”

After talking about the Harvest Days festival, Fox went on to describe what CALF was all about.

“CALF is a statewide foundation and our mission is connecting people to agriculture,” she stated about the organization’s purpose. “We do that through special events, like today, we do it through education and also community projects.”

According to Fox, CALF currently operates the 133-acre Lowell Ranch, which is equipped with indoor and outdoor classroom facilities and a community meeting room with kitchen. As part of their mission in continuing John and Bea Lowell’s love of agriculture, 4-H and county fair participation, CALF provides 4-H and FFA members space to raise livestock projects and land for food production as well as community gardens and a pumpkin patch.

“It’s hands on education for agriculture,” summed up Fox about CALF’s goal and how it interacts with the community. “I love my job.”

For more information about CALF, please visit http://www.TheCALF.org, e-mail Brooke Fox at Brooke@TheCALF.org or call them at (303) 688-1026.

The Colorado Agricultural Leadership Foundation (CALF) hosted its annual Harvest Days festival on October 15, at the historic Lowell Ranch near Castle Rock, Colo., and the pleasure matched the perfect weather for all the families taking part. With a roster of agriculture-related activities ranging from livestock pens to fresh produce, hayrides, a pumpkin patch and plenty of antique power equipment, the CALF sponsored event was as much fun as it was educational for over 1,000 people spending a Saturday at the festival.

Located on 133-acres a short distance south of the town of Castle Rock, Colo., those in attendance included many suburban families giving their children a first taste of the agricultural lifestyle, as well as discovering the culture for themselves. That fact was not lost on Brooke Fox, CALF President/CEO since the fall of 2009. Answering questions during the festival, Fox (who was raised on a ranch and has a passion for continuing the culture) was enthusiastic about the positive turnout as well as the suburban demographic.

“I love it,” said Fox about seeing all the families with children interested in attendance. “That’s what this is all about. Just look at all the people around the animals,” she continued, motioning toward livestock pens holding goats, sheep, pigs, a cow and a llama, all surrounded by curious children. “When (Harvest Days) first started five years ago, it was really the Douglas County ranch folks coming,” she described of the first event hosting a total of 150 people. “But it has really transitioned to suburbia, which is exactly what we want to do. We don’t want to preach to the choir,” she added with conviction. “We want to get that (agricultural) message out to everyone.”

Others helping out at the event appreciated the suburban turnout,

as well.

“The most important thing is for (everyone attending) to know about what it is,” said Wayne “Opie” Elmore of Castle Rock, one of many volunteer participants who brought antique power equipment and old-fashioned farm tools for display and hands-on interaction in an area near the Lowell Ranch’s historic house and barn. “(You get to) find out what your great-grandfather had to do to get through the day. A lot of kids don’t know what it takes to put food on the table. Kids learning about the farm is what this is all about.”

To a background symphony of numerous antique hit-and-miss motors, Elmore showed off a belt-powered corn grinder attached to an old John Deere tractor as well as a 1913 manual corn sheller that was a magnet for kids and parents that day. Every young boy or girl walking by just had to take a turn cranking the sheller and watching how dried corn was removed from the cob about 100 years ago. Such enthusiasm from children attending the festival was a main reason why volunteers had such a good time.

“I love this event,” stated Sara Warren of Franktown, Colo., an Assistant Organization Leader for the Hoof Over Heels 4-H Club. Warren was there to spread the word regarding the upcoming County Fair 4-H season to kids who might be interested in showing and/or parents who might be interested in having their kids show. “It gets the kids getting used to agriculture (and) I love seeing the kids around the animals,” she added. “It opens up their eyes a lot. Maybe they can get their parents to buy one for them,” finished Warren with a laugh.

Between shelling corn, grinding corn, riding behind a carriage or a vintage tractor and seeing livestock up close and personal, all the children at the event had a great time. That was good for both organizers and parents.

“It seemed like a lot of fun and something to do on a nice fall day,” said Shannon of Castle Rock, a mother attending with her 5-year-old daughter, Abbey. Although Abbey was shy, she finally admitted one of her favorite parts of the day was petting the pigs, because they were “soft.” While Abbey continued watching the pigs, her mother said her daughter also enjoyed doing crafts and getting her face painted.

Although there was a variety of family-oriented activities throughout the venue – including sack races, stick horses, a pumpkin patch and hayrides – each one had a distinct rural feel, which was by design.

“This is an agricultural festival (and) it’s not meant to be a carnival,” explained Fox. “We’re not going to have jumpy houses (or things like that). We want it to be a place where people can connect into agriculture; to see the people who are producing their food and get a little better understanding of where their food comes from. That’s what it’s about.”

After talking about the Harvest Days festival, Fox went on to describe what CALF was all about.

“CALF is a statewide foundation and our mission is connecting people to agriculture,” she stated about the organization’s purpose. “We do that through special events, like today, we do it through education and also community projects.”

According to Fox, CALF currently operates the 133-acre Lowell Ranch, which is equipped with indoor and outdoor classroom facilities and a community meeting room with kitchen. As part of their mission in continuing John and Bea Lowell’s love of agriculture, 4-H and county fair participation, CALF provides 4-H and FFA members space to raise livestock projects and land for food production as well as community gardens and a pumpkin patch.

“It’s hands on education for agriculture,” summed up Fox about CALF’s goal and how it interacts with the community. “I love my job.”

For more information about CALF, please visit http://www.TheCALF.org, e-mail Brooke Fox at Brooke@TheCALF.org or call them at (303) 688-1026.

The Colorado Agricultural Leadership Foundation (CALF) hosted its annual Harvest Days festival on October 15, at the historic Lowell Ranch near Castle Rock, Colo., and the pleasure matched the perfect weather for all the families taking part. With a roster of agriculture-related activities ranging from livestock pens to fresh produce, hayrides, a pumpkin patch and plenty of antique power equipment, the CALF sponsored event was as much fun as it was educational for over 1,000 people spending a Saturday at the festival.

Located on 133-acres a short distance south of the town of Castle Rock, Colo., those in attendance included many suburban families giving their children a first taste of the agricultural lifestyle, as well as discovering the culture for themselves. That fact was not lost on Brooke Fox, CALF President/CEO since the fall of 2009. Answering questions during the festival, Fox (who was raised on a ranch and has a passion for continuing the culture) was enthusiastic about the positive turnout as well as the suburban demographic.

“I love it,” said Fox about seeing all the families with children interested in attendance. “That’s what this is all about. Just look at all the people around the animals,” she continued, motioning toward livestock pens holding goats, sheep, pigs, a cow and a llama, all surrounded by curious children. “When (Harvest Days) first started five years ago, it was really the Douglas County ranch folks coming,” she described of the first event hosting a total of 150 people. “But it has really transitioned to suburbia, which is exactly what we want to do. We don’t want to preach to the choir,” she added with conviction. “We want to get that (agricultural) message out to everyone.”

Others helping out at the event appreciated the suburban turnout,

as well.

“The most important thing is for (everyone attending) to know about what it is,” said Wayne “Opie” Elmore of Castle Rock, one of many volunteer participants who brought antique power equipment and old-fashioned farm tools for display and hands-on interaction in an area near the Lowell Ranch’s historic house and barn. “(You get to) find out what your great-grandfather had to do to get through the day. A lot of kids don’t know what it takes to put food on the table. Kids learning about the farm is what this is all about.”

To a background symphony of numerous antique hit-and-miss motors, Elmore showed off a belt-powered corn grinder attached to an old John Deere tractor as well as a 1913 manual corn sheller that was a magnet for kids and parents that day. Every young boy or girl walking by just had to take a turn cranking the sheller and watching how dried corn was removed from the cob about 100 years ago. Such enthusiasm from children attending the festival was a main reason why volunteers had such a good time.

“I love this event,” stated Sara Warren of Franktown, Colo., an Assistant Organization Leader for the Hoof Over Heels 4-H Club. Warren was there to spread the word regarding the upcoming County Fair 4-H season to kids who might be interested in showing and/or parents who might be interested in having their kids show. “It gets the kids getting used to agriculture (and) I love seeing the kids around the animals,” she added. “It opens up their eyes a lot. Maybe they can get their parents to buy one for them,” finished Warren with a laugh.

Between shelling corn, grinding corn, riding behind a carriage or a vintage tractor and seeing livestock up close and personal, all the children at the event had a great time. That was good for both organizers and parents.

“It seemed like a lot of fun and something to do on a nice fall day,” said Shannon of Castle Rock, a mother attending with her 5-year-old daughter, Abbey. Although Abbey was shy, she finally admitted one of her favorite parts of the day was petting the pigs, because they were “soft.” While Abbey continued watching the pigs, her mother said her daughter also enjoyed doing crafts and getting her face painted.

Although there was a variety of family-oriented activities throughout the venue – including sack races, stick horses, a pumpkin patch and hayrides – each one had a distinct rural feel, which was by design.

“This is an agricultural festival (and) it’s not meant to be a carnival,” explained Fox. “We’re not going to have jumpy houses (or things like that). We want it to be a place where people can connect into agriculture; to see the people who are producing their food and get a little better understanding of where their food comes from. That’s what it’s about.”

After talking about the Harvest Days festival, Fox went on to describe what CALF was all about.

“CALF is a statewide foundation and our mission is connecting people to agriculture,” she stated about the organization’s purpose. “We do that through special events, like today, we do it through education and also community projects.”

According to Fox, CALF currently operates the 133-acre Lowell Ranch, which is equipped with indoor and outdoor classroom facilities and a community meeting room with kitchen. As part of their mission in continuing John and Bea Lowell’s love of agriculture, 4-H and county fair participation, CALF provides 4-H and FFA members space to raise livestock projects and land for food production as well as community gardens and a pumpkin patch.

“It’s hands on education for agriculture,” summed up Fox about CALF’s goal and how it interacts with the community. “I love my job.”

For more information about CALF, please visit http://www.TheCALF.org, e-mail Brooke Fox at Brooke@TheCALF.org or call them at (303) 688-1026.

The Colorado Agricultural Leadership Foundation (CALF) hosted its annual Harvest Days festival on October 15, at the historic Lowell Ranch near Castle Rock, Colo., and the pleasure matched the perfect weather for all the families taking part. With a roster of agriculture-related activities ranging from livestock pens to fresh produce, hayrides, a pumpkin patch and plenty of antique power equipment, the CALF sponsored event was as much fun as it was educational for over 1,000 people spending a Saturday at the festival.

Located on 133-acres a short distance south of the town of Castle Rock, Colo., those in attendance included many suburban families giving their children a first taste of the agricultural lifestyle, as well as discovering the culture for themselves. That fact was not lost on Brooke Fox, CALF President/CEO since the fall of 2009. Answering questions during the festival, Fox (who was raised on a ranch and has a passion for continuing the culture) was enthusiastic about the positive turnout as well as the suburban demographic.

“I love it,” said Fox about seeing all the families with children interested in attendance. “That’s what this is all about. Just look at all the people around the animals,” she continued, motioning toward livestock pens holding goats, sheep, pigs, a cow and a llama, all surrounded by curious children. “When (Harvest Days) first started five years ago, it was really the Douglas County ranch folks coming,” she described of the first event hosting a total of 150 people. “But it has really transitioned to suburbia, which is exactly what we want to do. We don’t want to preach to the choir,” she added with conviction. “We want to get that (agricultural) message out to everyone.”

Others helping out at the event appreciated the suburban turnout,

as well.

“The most important thing is for (everyone attending) to know about what it is,” said Wayne “Opie” Elmore of Castle Rock, one of many volunteer participants who brought antique power equipment and old-fashioned farm tools for display and hands-on interaction in an area near the Lowell Ranch’s historic house and barn. “(You get to) find out what your great-grandfather had to do to get through the day. A lot of kids don’t know what it takes to put food on the table. Kids learning about the farm is what this is all about.”

To a background symphony of numerous antique hit-and-miss motors, Elmore showed off a belt-powered corn grinder attached to an old John Deere tractor as well as a 1913 manual corn sheller that was a magnet for kids and parents that day. Every young boy or girl walking by just had to take a turn cranking the sheller and watching how dried corn was removed from the cob about 100 years ago. Such enthusiasm from children attending the festival was a main reason why volunteers had such a good time.

“I love this event,” stated Sara Warren of Franktown, Colo., an Assistant Organization Leader for the Hoof Over Heels 4-H Club. Warren was there to spread the word regarding the upcoming County Fair 4-H season to kids who might be interested in showing and/or parents who might be interested in having their kids show. “It gets the kids getting used to agriculture (and) I love seeing the kids around the animals,” she added. “It opens up their eyes a lot. Maybe they can get their parents to buy one for them,” finished Warren with a laugh.

Between shelling corn, grinding corn, riding behind a carriage or a vintage tractor and seeing livestock up close and personal, all the children at the event had a great time. That was good for both organizers and parents.

“It seemed like a lot of fun and something to do on a nice fall day,” said Shannon of Castle Rock, a mother attending with her 5-year-old daughter, Abbey. Although Abbey was shy, she finally admitted one of her favorite parts of the day was petting the pigs, because they were “soft.” While Abbey continued watching the pigs, her mother said her daughter also enjoyed doing crafts and getting her face painted.

Although there was a variety of family-oriented activities throughout the venue – including sack races, stick horses, a pumpkin patch and hayrides – each one had a distinct rural feel, which was by design.

“This is an agricultural festival (and) it’s not meant to be a carnival,” explained Fox. “We’re not going to have jumpy houses (or things like that). We want it to be a place where people can connect into agriculture; to see the people who are producing their food and get a little better understanding of where their food comes from. That’s what it’s about.”

After talking about the Harvest Days festival, Fox went on to describe what CALF was all about.

“CALF is a statewide foundation and our mission is connecting people to agriculture,” she stated about the organization’s purpose. “We do that through special events, like today, we do it through education and also community projects.”

According to Fox, CALF currently operates the 133-acre Lowell Ranch, which is equipped with indoor and outdoor classroom facilities and a community meeting room with kitchen. As part of their mission in continuing John and Bea Lowell’s love of agriculture, 4-H and county fair participation, CALF provides 4-H and FFA members space to raise livestock projects and land for food production as well as community gardens and a pumpkin patch.

“It’s hands on education for agriculture,” summed up Fox about CALF’s goal and how it interacts with the community. “I love my job.”

For more information about CALF, please visit http://www.TheCALF.org, e-mail Brooke Fox at Brooke@TheCALF.org or call them at (303) 688-1026.

The Colorado Agricultural Leadership Foundation (CALF) hosted its annual Harvest Days festival on October 15, at the historic Lowell Ranch near Castle Rock, Colo., and the pleasure matched the perfect weather for all the families taking part. With a roster of agriculture-related activities ranging from livestock pens to fresh produce, hayrides, a pumpkin patch and plenty of antique power equipment, the CALF sponsored event was as much fun as it was educational for over 1,000 people spending a Saturday at the festival.

Located on 133-acres a short distance south of the town of Castle Rock, Colo., those in attendance included many suburban families giving their children a first taste of the agricultural lifestyle, as well as discovering the culture for themselves. That fact was not lost on Brooke Fox, CALF President/CEO since the fall of 2009. Answering questions during the festival, Fox (who was raised on a ranch and has a passion for continuing the culture) was enthusiastic about the positive turnout as well as the suburban demographic.

“I love it,” said Fox about seeing all the families with children interested in attendance. “That’s what this is all about. Just look at all the people around the animals,” she continued, motioning toward livestock pens holding goats, sheep, pigs, a cow and a llama, all surrounded by curious children. “When (Harvest Days) first started five years ago, it was really the Douglas County ranch folks coming,” she described of the first event hosting a total of 150 people. “But it has really transitioned to suburbia, which is exactly what we want to do. We don’t want to preach to the choir,” she added with conviction. “We want to get that (agricultural) message out to everyone.”

Others helping out at the event appreciated the suburban turnout,

as well.

“The most important thing is for (everyone attending) to know about what it is,” said Wayne “Opie” Elmore of Castle Rock, one of many volunteer participants who brought antique power equipment and old-fashioned farm tools for display and hands-on interaction in an area near the Lowell Ranch’s historic house and barn. “(You get to) find out what your great-grandfather had to do to get through the day. A lot of kids don’t know what it takes to put food on the table. Kids learning about the farm is what this is all about.”

To a background symphony of numerous antique hit-and-miss motors, Elmore showed off a belt-powered corn grinder attached to an old John Deere tractor as well as a 1913 manual corn sheller that was a magnet for kids and parents that day. Every young boy or girl walking by just had to take a turn cranking the sheller and watching how dried corn was removed from the cob about 100 years ago. Such enthusiasm from children attending the festival was a main reason why volunteers had such a good time.

“I love this event,” stated Sara Warren of Franktown, Colo., an Assistant Organization Leader for the Hoof Over Heels 4-H Club. Warren was there to spread the word regarding the upcoming County Fair 4-H season to kids who might be interested in showing and/or parents who might be interested in having their kids show. “It gets the kids getting used to agriculture (and) I love seeing the kids around the animals,” she added. “It opens up their eyes a lot. Maybe they can get their parents to buy one for them,” finished Warren with a laugh.

Between shelling corn, grinding corn, riding behind a carriage or a vintage tractor and seeing livestock up close and personal, all the children at the event had a great time. That was good for both organizers and parents.

“It seemed like a lot of fun and something to do on a nice fall day,” said Shannon of Castle Rock, a mother attending with her 5-year-old daughter, Abbey. Although Abbey was shy, she finally admitted one of her favorite parts of the day was petting the pigs, because they were “soft.” While Abbey continued watching the pigs, her mother said her daughter also enjoyed doing crafts and getting her face painted.

Although there was a variety of family-oriented activities throughout the venue – including sack races, stick horses, a pumpkin patch and hayrides – each one had a distinct rural feel, which was by design.

“This is an agricultural festival (and) it’s not meant to be a carnival,” explained Fox. “We’re not going to have jumpy houses (or things like that). We want it to be a place where people can connect into agriculture; to see the people who are producing their food and get a little better understanding of where their food comes from. That’s what it’s about.”

After talking about the Harvest Days festival, Fox went on to describe what CALF was all about.

“CALF is a statewide foundation and our mission is connecting people to agriculture,” she stated about the organization’s purpose. “We do that through special events, like today, we do it through education and also community projects.”

According to Fox, CALF currently operates the 133-acre Lowell Ranch, which is equipped with indoor and outdoor classroom facilities and a community meeting room with kitchen. As part of their mission in continuing John and Bea Lowell’s love of agriculture, 4-H and county fair participation, CALF provides 4-H and FFA members space to raise livestock projects and land for food production as well as community gardens and a pumpkin patch.

“It’s hands on education for agriculture,” summed up Fox about CALF’s goal and how it interacts with the community. “I love my job.”

For more information about CALF, please visit http://www.TheCALF.org, e-mail Brooke Fox at Brooke@TheCALF.org or call them at (303) 688-1026.

The Colorado Agricultural Leadership Foundation (CALF) hosted its annual Harvest Days festival on October 15, at the historic Lowell Ranch near Castle Rock, Colo., and the pleasure matched the perfect weather for all the families taking part. With a roster of agriculture-related activities ranging from livestock pens to fresh produce, hayrides, a pumpkin patch and plenty of antique power equipment, the CALF sponsored event was as much fun as it was educational for over 1,000 people spending a Saturday at the festival.

Located on 133-acres a short distance south of the town of Castle Rock, Colo., those in attendance included many suburban families giving their children a first taste of the agricultural lifestyle, as well as discovering the culture for themselves. That fact was not lost on Brooke Fox, CALF President/CEO since the fall of 2009. Answering questions during the festival, Fox (who was raised on a ranch and has a passion for continuing the culture) was enthusiastic about the positive turnout as well as the suburban demographic.

“I love it,” said Fox about seeing all the families with children interested in attendance. “That’s what this is all about. Just look at all the people around the animals,” she continued, motioning toward livestock pens holding goats, sheep, pigs, a cow and a llama, all surrounded by curious children. “When (Harvest Days) first started five years ago, it was really the Douglas County ranch folks coming,” she described of the first event hosting a total of 150 people. “But it has really transitioned to suburbia, which is exactly what we want to do. We don’t want to preach to the choir,” she added with conviction. “We want to get that (agricultural) message out to everyone.”

Others helping out at the event appreciated the suburban turnout,

as well.

“The most important thing is for (everyone attending) to know about what it is,” said Wayne “Opie” Elmore of Castle Rock, one of many volunteer participants who brought antique power equipment and old-fashioned farm tools for display and hands-on interaction in an area near the Lowell Ranch’s historic house and barn. “(You get to) find out what your great-grandfather had to do to get through the day. A lot of kids don’t know what it takes to put food on the table. Kids learning about the farm is what this is all about.”

To a background symphony of numerous antique hit-and-miss motors, Elmore showed off a belt-powered corn grinder attached to an old John Deere tractor as well as a 1913 manual corn sheller that was a magnet for kids and parents that day. Every young boy or girl walking by just had to take a turn cranking the sheller and watching how dried corn was removed from the cob about 100 years ago. Such enthusiasm from children attending the festival was a main reason why volunteers had such a good time.

“I love this event,” stated Sara Warren of Franktown, Colo., an Assistant Organization Leader for the Hoof Over Heels 4-H Club. Warren was there to spread the word regarding the upcoming County Fair 4-H season to kids who might be interested in showing and/or parents who might be interested in having their kids show. “It gets the kids getting used to agriculture (and) I love seeing the kids around the animals,” she added. “It opens up their eyes a lot. Maybe they can get their parents to buy one for them,” finished Warren with a laugh.

Between shelling corn, grinding corn, riding behind a carriage or a vintage tractor and seeing livestock up close and personal, all the children at the event had a great time. That was good for both organizers and parents.

“It seemed like a lot of fun and something to do on a nice fall day,” said Shannon of Castle Rock, a mother attending with her 5-year-old daughter, Abbey. Although Abbey was shy, she finally admitted one of her favorite parts of the day was petting the pigs, because they were “soft.” While Abbey continued watching the pigs, her mother said her daughter also enjoyed doing crafts and getting her face painted.

Although there was a variety of family-oriented activities throughout the venue – including sack races, stick horses, a pumpkin patch and hayrides – each one had a distinct rural feel, which was by design.

“This is an agricultural festival (and) it’s not meant to be a carnival,” explained Fox. “We’re not going to have jumpy houses (or things like that). We want it to be a place where people can connect into agriculture; to see the people who are producing their food and get a little better understanding of where their food comes from. That’s what it’s about.”

After talking about the Harvest Days festival, Fox went on to describe what CALF was all about.

“CALF is a statewide foundation and our mission is connecting people to agriculture,” she stated about the organization’s purpose. “We do that through special events, like today, we do it through education and also community projects.”

According to Fox, CALF currently operates the 133-acre Lowell Ranch, which is equipped with indoor and outdoor classroom facilities and a community meeting room with kitchen. As part of their mission in continuing John and Bea Lowell’s love of agriculture, 4-H and county fair participation, CALF provides 4-H and FFA members space to raise livestock projects and land for food production as well as community gardens and a pumpkin patch.

“It’s hands on education for agriculture,” summed up Fox about CALF’s goal and how it interacts with the community. “I love my job.”

For more information about CALF, please visit http://www.TheCALF.org, e-mail Brooke Fox at Brooke@TheCALF.org or call them at (303) 688-1026.