Can You Guess the Year? 1-24-11 | TheFencePost.com

Can You Guess the Year? 1-24-11

Article and artwork by Dorothy Miller, Lochbuie, Colo.

This year the town of Loveland, Colo., began a business around February 14 of sending Valentine’s from Loveland.

People long ago believed that if a woman saw a robin flying overhead on Valentine’s Day, it meant she would marry a sailor. If she saw a sparrow, she would marry a poor man and be very happy. If she saw a goldfinch, she would marry a millionaire.

A revised and streamlined revival of “Kern and Hammerstein’s Show Boat” opened on Broadway at the Ziegfeld Theater.

The first meeting of the United Nations was held in London.

Project Diana bounced radar waves off the Moon, measuring the exact distance between the earth and the moon, and proving that communication is possible between Earth and outer space, effectively opening the space age.

In Philadelphia, General Electric strikers and police clashed.

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In his speech at Westminster College, in Fulton, Mo., Winston Churchill talked about the Iron Curtain.

Joan Crawford missed the Academy Awards this year claiming she had pneumonia. It was said she missed because she was sure she wouldn’t win the Academy Award for Best Actress for “Mildred Pierce.” She did win the Academy award, and it was delivered to her while in bed that night. Best picture in the Academy Awards this year was “Lost Weekend.”

Hosts for the awards were James Stewart and Bob Hope.

The Soviet Union and Switzerland resumed diplomatic relations.

The United Kingdom granted Transjordan its independence; three years later the country changed its name to Jordan.

Six inmates unsuccessfully tried to escape from Alcatraz Prison. It became known as the “Battle of Alcatraz.”

Vancouver Island suffered an earthquake.

After over 381 years of Western dominance, the Philippines attained full independence.

Bikinis went on sale in Paris.

The Irgun bombed the King David Hotel in Jerusalem because of secretive talks between Jews and Britain to consolidate the state of Israel.

In Atlantic City, N.J., Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis staged their first show as a comedy team.

Holiday World, originally called Santa Claus Land, opened to the public. It became the first themed park preceding Disneyland by nine years.

Violence between Muslims and Hindus in Calcutta left 3,000 dead.

Afghanistan, Iceland and Sweden joined the United Nations.

Frank Capra’s “It’s a Wonderful Life,” featuring James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore, Henry Travers, and Thomas Mitchell, was released in New York.

President Harry Truman delivered Proclamation 2714, which officially ended hostilities in World War II.

Al Jolson rerecorded his old hits for the soundtrack of the movie “The Jolson Story.”

“The Harvey Girls,” a movie starring Judy Garland and Ray Bolger and set in a Harvey House Hotel, made its American debut. The movie won a Best Song Oscar for Johnny Mercer’s “On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe.”

Pullman Standard delivered the first passenger car built after World War II.

President Harry Truman seized control of the railroads to prevent a nationwide strike.

Children’s puppet Muffin the Mule debuted in an episode of “For The Children.” He was so popular he was given his own show later in that same year.

The first church service was telecast from Grace Episcopal Church in New York.

The Chicago Bears won the NFL crown by defeating the New York Giants 24-14 in New York.

Benjamin Spock’s childcare classic was published.

The first automatic electronic digital computer, ENIAC, was dedicated at the University of Pennsylvania.

The U.S. Army made radar contact with the moon for the first time.

Can you guess the year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1946. Congratulations to Robert Anderson of Bottineau, N.D., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.

This year the town of Loveland, Colo., began a business around February 14 of sending Valentine’s from Loveland.

People long ago believed that if a woman saw a robin flying overhead on Valentine’s Day, it meant she would marry a sailor. If she saw a sparrow, she would marry a poor man and be very happy. If she saw a goldfinch, she would marry a millionaire.

A revised and streamlined revival of “Kern and Hammerstein’s Show Boat” opened on Broadway at the Ziegfeld Theater.

The first meeting of the United Nations was held in London.

Project Diana bounced radar waves off the Moon, measuring the exact distance between the earth and the moon, and proving that communication is possible between Earth and outer space, effectively opening the space age.

In Philadelphia, General Electric strikers and police clashed.

In his speech at Westminster College, in Fulton, Mo., Winston Churchill talked about the Iron Curtain.

Joan Crawford missed the Academy Awards this year claiming she had pneumonia. It was said she missed because she was sure she wouldn’t win the Academy Award for Best Actress for “Mildred Pierce.” She did win the Academy award, and it was delivered to her while in bed that night. Best picture in the Academy Awards this year was “Lost Weekend.”

Hosts for the awards were James Stewart and Bob Hope.

The Soviet Union and Switzerland resumed diplomatic relations.

The United Kingdom granted Transjordan its independence; three years later the country changed its name to Jordan.

Six inmates unsuccessfully tried to escape from Alcatraz Prison. It became known as the “Battle of Alcatraz.”

Vancouver Island suffered an earthquake.

After over 381 years of Western dominance, the Philippines attained full independence.

Bikinis went on sale in Paris.

The Irgun bombed the King David Hotel in Jerusalem because of secretive talks between Jews and Britain to consolidate the state of Israel.

In Atlantic City, N.J., Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis staged their first show as a comedy team.

Holiday World, originally called Santa Claus Land, opened to the public. It became the first themed park preceding Disneyland by nine years.

Violence between Muslims and Hindus in Calcutta left 3,000 dead.

Afghanistan, Iceland and Sweden joined the United Nations.

Frank Capra’s “It’s a Wonderful Life,” featuring James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore, Henry Travers, and Thomas Mitchell, was released in New York.

President Harry Truman delivered Proclamation 2714, which officially ended hostilities in World War II.

Al Jolson rerecorded his old hits for the soundtrack of the movie “The Jolson Story.”

“The Harvey Girls,” a movie starring Judy Garland and Ray Bolger and set in a Harvey House Hotel, made its American debut. The movie won a Best Song Oscar for Johnny Mercer’s “On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe.”

Pullman Standard delivered the first passenger car built after World War II.

President Harry Truman seized control of the railroads to prevent a nationwide strike.

Children’s puppet Muffin the Mule debuted in an episode of “For The Children.” He was so popular he was given his own show later in that same year.

The first church service was telecast from Grace Episcopal Church in New York.

The Chicago Bears won the NFL crown by defeating the New York Giants 24-14 in New York.

Benjamin Spock’s childcare classic was published.

The first automatic electronic digital computer, ENIAC, was dedicated at the University of Pennsylvania.

The U.S. Army made radar contact with the moon for the first time.

Can you guess the year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1946. Congratulations to Robert Anderson of Bottineau, N.D., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.