Can You Guess the Year? 12-27-10 | TheFencePost.com

Can You Guess the Year? 12-27-10

Article and artwork by Dorothy Miller, Lochbuie, Colo.

In 100 years people would be able to walk on water.

This year Austrian psychiatrist Sigmund Freud published “The Interpretation of Dreams.”

A hurricane ravaged Galveston, Texas, leaving 6,000 people dead.

Carrie Chapman Catt succeeded Susan B. Anthony as president of the National Woman Suffrage Association.

The cost of a first-class stamp was 2 cents.

Floradora opened at the Broadway Casino Theatre. It introduced the Floradora sextet, a predecessor to the chorus line.

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs was organized in Philadelphia, Pa., with eight founding teams.

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Governor William Goebel of Kentucky died of wounds after being shot by several assassins. Goebel, who had prevailed in a dispute over the winner of the election in November had been sworn in on his deathbed. The former U.S. Secretary of State Caleb Powers was later found guilty in the conspiracy to kill Goebel.

Strikers in Aachen, Vienna, and Brussels demanded an eight-hour working day and higher wages.

A fire at Buckingham Palace destroyed part of its roof.

The Gold Standard Act was ratified, placing the United States currency on the gold standard.

Over 1,000 tons of waste were removed from demolished buildings in Sydney, Australia, in areas affected by an outbreak of the bubonic plague.

In France, the length of a legal workday for women and children was limited to 11 hours.

Hawaii became an official U.S. Territory.

The first zeppelin flight was carried out in Friedrichshafen, Germany.

Winston Churchill was elected to Parliament for the first time.

Popular songs this year were “Absence Makes The Heart Grow Fonder” and “A Bird in a Gilded Cage.”

The Wright brothers arrived at Kitty Hawk, N.C., to begin their first season of glider experiments.

Some interesting predictions were made this year, including “Because of better health Americans would be taller by one to two inches and live 50 years instead of 35.”

There would be no street cars in Cities. Traffic would be below or above ground thanks to subways or tunnels, or to high trestles with “moving-sidewalk” stairways. Cities would be free from all noises.

There would be no mosquitoes or flies. Boards of health would have drained all stagnant pools, filled in all swamp-lands, and chemically treated all still-water streams.

The milkweed will have been developed into a rubber plant. The soil will be kept enriched by plants which take their nutrition from the air and give fertility to the earth.

Strawberries, raspberries and blackberries as large as apples would be eaten for Christmas.

A university education will be free to every man and woman. Poor students will be given free board, free clothing and free books if ambitious and actually unable to meet their school expenses. Medical inspectors regularly visiting the public schools will furnish poor children free eyeglasses, free dentistry and free medical attention. In vacation time poor children will be taken on trips to various parts of the world.

Coal will not be used for heating or cooking. Homes will have no chimneys, because no smoke will be created within their walls.

Pneumatic tubes, instead of store wagons, will deliver packages and bundles. These tubes will collect, deliver and transport mail for hundreds of miles. Food will be served hot or cold to private houses in pneumatic tubes or automobile wagons. The meal being over, the dirty dishes will be packed and returned to the cooking establishments where they will be washed.

There will be no wild animals except in menageries. Rats and mice will have been exterminated.

Can you guess the year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1956. Congratulations to Virginia Rasmussen of Wray, Colo., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.

This year Austrian psychiatrist Sigmund Freud published “The Interpretation of Dreams.”

A hurricane ravaged Galveston, Texas, leaving 6,000 people dead.

Carrie Chapman Catt succeeded Susan B. Anthony as president of the National Woman Suffrage Association.

The cost of a first-class stamp was 2 cents.

Floradora opened at the Broadway Casino Theatre. It introduced the Floradora sextet, a predecessor to the chorus line.

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs was organized in Philadelphia, Pa., with eight founding teams.

Governor William Goebel of Kentucky died of wounds after being shot by several assassins. Goebel, who had prevailed in a dispute over the winner of the election in November had been sworn in on his deathbed. The former U.S. Secretary of State Caleb Powers was later found guilty in the conspiracy to kill Goebel.

Strikers in Aachen, Vienna, and Brussels demanded an eight-hour working day and higher wages.

A fire at Buckingham Palace destroyed part of its roof.

The Gold Standard Act was ratified, placing the United States currency on the gold standard.

Over 1,000 tons of waste were removed from demolished buildings in Sydney, Australia, in areas affected by an outbreak of the bubonic plague.

In France, the length of a legal workday for women and children was limited to 11 hours.

Hawaii became an official U.S. Territory.

The first zeppelin flight was carried out in Friedrichshafen, Germany.

Winston Churchill was elected to Parliament for the first time.

Popular songs this year were “Absence Makes The Heart Grow Fonder” and “A Bird in a Gilded Cage.”

The Wright brothers arrived at Kitty Hawk, N.C., to begin their first season of glider experiments.

Some interesting predictions were made this year, including “Because of better health Americans would be taller by one to two inches and live 50 years instead of 35.”

There would be no street cars in Cities. Traffic would be below or above ground thanks to subways or tunnels, or to high trestles with “moving-sidewalk” stairways. Cities would be free from all noises.

There would be no mosquitoes or flies. Boards of health would have drained all stagnant pools, filled in all swamp-lands, and chemically treated all still-water streams.

The milkweed will have been developed into a rubber plant. The soil will be kept enriched by plants which take their nutrition from the air and give fertility to the earth.

Strawberries, raspberries and blackberries as large as apples would be eaten for Christmas.

A university education will be free to every man and woman. Poor students will be given free board, free clothing and free books if ambitious and actually unable to meet their school expenses. Medical inspectors regularly visiting the public schools will furnish poor children free eyeglasses, free dentistry and free medical attention. In vacation time poor children will be taken on trips to various parts of the world.

Coal will not be used for heating or cooking. Homes will have no chimneys, because no smoke will be created within their walls.

Pneumatic tubes, instead of store wagons, will deliver packages and bundles. These tubes will collect, deliver and transport mail for hundreds of miles. Food will be served hot or cold to private houses in pneumatic tubes or automobile wagons. The meal being over, the dirty dishes will be packed and returned to the cooking establishments where they will be washed.

There will be no wild animals except in menageries. Rats and mice will have been exterminated.

Can you guess the year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1956. Congratulations to Virginia Rasmussen of Wray, Colo., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.