Can You Guess the Year? 2-21-11 | TheFencePost.com
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Can You Guess the Year? 2-21-11

Article and artwork by Dorothy Miller
Lochbuie, Colo.
Four Mile House was built this year.

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Four Mile House was built this year. It served as a stage stop, wayside inn, and tavern for travelers on the Cherokee Trail on their way to Denver City.

U.S. Congressman Daniel Sickles shot Philip Barton Key for having an affair with his wife.

This was the year of the largest Slave Auction in history, dubbed as “The Weeping Time.” Pierce M Butler sold 436 men, women, children, and infants, all of whom stayed in stalls meant for horses at a racetrack in Savannah, Ga., for weeks before the auction took place.

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania issued the charter establishing the Zoological Society of Philadelphia, founder of the nation’s first zoo.

“A Tale of Two Cities” written by Charles Dickens was published.

Ground was broken for the Suez Canal.

The Great Clock at the Palace of Westminster, London was started.

Charles Blondin crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope for the first time. Blondin was one of the greatest acrobats of all time. He began his training at 5-years-old and within six months was astonishing crowds as “the Little Wonder.” The most outstanding among his many dangerous feats were the exhibitions he gave on an 1,100 foot-long tightrope stretched 160-feet above Niagara Falls. He crossed the Falls several times, always with different theatrical variations – blindfolded, on stilts, pushing a wheelbarrow. Once he even sat on the tightrope and cooked an omelet! After successfully crossing Niagara, Blondin asked the gathered crowd, “Who believes I can cross back over the Falls?” The crowd roared as one man said, “We believe!” “Then who,” Blondin said, “is willing to get on my back while I cross?” The crowd was silent.

Finally, one man stepped out of the crowd and said, “I will.” He climbed on Blondin’s shoulders, and they both walked successfully over Niagara Falls.

The Pike’s Peak Gold Rush began in the Colorado Territory.

Edwin Drake drilled the first oil well in the United States, near Titusville, Pa., starting the Pennsylvanian oil rush.

John Brown raided the Harpers Ferry Armory in Harper’s Ferry, Va., in an unsuccessful bid to spark a general slave rebellion.

The current Cape Lookout, North Carolina, lighthouse was lighted for the first time.

British naturalist Charles Darwin published “The Origin of Species,” a book which argued that species gradually evolved through natural selection.

Abolitionist leader John Brown was hanged for his October 16 raid on Harpers Ferry, W.Va.

District Nursing began in Liverpool, England, when philanthropist William Rathbone employed Mary Robinson to nurse the sick poor in their own homes in the city.

Popular music that year was “Darling Little Blue Eyed Nell.”

John Freeman Young published the English translation of “Silent Night.”

The first steamboat, Red Rover, sailed.

The Atchison and Topeka Railroad Company, forerunner of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, was chartered in Kansas.

The Elevator was patented.

The first air mail, in a balloon, took off from Lafayette Indiana.

The first Pullman sleeping car was put in service.

Jules Leotard performed the first Flying Trapeze circus act in Paris. He also designed the garment that bears his name.

Can you guess the year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1946. Congratulations to Joyce Hunziker of Ft. Lupton, Colo., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.

Four Mile House was built this year. It served as a stage stop, wayside inn, and tavern for travelers on the Cherokee Trail on their way to Denver City.

U.S. Congressman Daniel Sickles shot Philip Barton Key for having an affair with his wife.

This was the year of the largest Slave Auction in history, dubbed as “The Weeping Time.” Pierce M Butler sold 436 men, women, children, and infants, all of whom stayed in stalls meant for horses at a racetrack in Savannah, Ga., for weeks before the auction took place.

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania issued the charter establishing the Zoological Society of Philadelphia, founder of the nation’s first zoo.

“A Tale of Two Cities” written by Charles Dickens was published.

Ground was broken for the Suez Canal.

The Great Clock at the Palace of Westminster, London was started.

Charles Blondin crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope for the first time. Blondin was one of the greatest acrobats of all time. He began his training at 5-years-old and within six months was astonishing crowds as “the Little Wonder.” The most outstanding among his many dangerous feats were the exhibitions he gave on an 1,100 foot-long tightrope stretched 160-feet above Niagara Falls. He crossed the Falls several times, always with different theatrical variations – blindfolded, on stilts, pushing a wheelbarrow. Once he even sat on the tightrope and cooked an omelet! After successfully crossing Niagara, Blondin asked the gathered crowd, “Who believes I can cross back over the Falls?” The crowd roared as one man said, “We believe!” “Then who,” Blondin said, “is willing to get on my back while I cross?” The crowd was silent.

Finally, one man stepped out of the crowd and said, “I will.” He climbed on Blondin’s shoulders, and they both walked successfully over Niagara Falls.

The Pike’s Peak Gold Rush began in the Colorado Territory.

Edwin Drake drilled the first oil well in the United States, near Titusville, Pa., starting the Pennsylvanian oil rush.

John Brown raided the Harpers Ferry Armory in Harper’s Ferry, Va., in an unsuccessful bid to spark a general slave rebellion.

The current Cape Lookout, North Carolina, lighthouse was lighted for the first time.

British naturalist Charles Darwin published “The Origin of Species,” a book which argued that species gradually evolved through natural selection.

Abolitionist leader John Brown was hanged for his October 16 raid on Harpers Ferry, W.Va.

District Nursing began in Liverpool, England, when philanthropist William Rathbone employed Mary Robinson to nurse the sick poor in their own homes in the city.

Popular music that year was “Darling Little Blue Eyed Nell.”

John Freeman Young published the English translation of “Silent Night.”

The first steamboat, Red Rover, sailed.

The Atchison and Topeka Railroad Company, forerunner of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, was chartered in Kansas.

The Elevator was patented.

The first air mail, in a balloon, took off from Lafayette Indiana.

The first Pullman sleeping car was put in service.

Jules Leotard performed the first Flying Trapeze circus act in Paris. He also designed the garment that bears his name.

Can you guess the year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1946. Congratulations to Joyce Hunziker of Ft. Lupton, Colo., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.


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