Can You Guess the Year? 7-25-11 | TheFencePost.com

Can You Guess the Year? 7-25-11

Article and artwork by Dorothy Miller, Lochbuie, Colo.

Dr. Ernst Werner von Siemens ran his first trolley bus, "Elektromote" in a Berlin, Germany suburb.

This year P.T. Barnum purchased the elephant Jumbo.

Polygamy was made a felony by the Edmunds Act passed by the U.S. Congress.

Robert Koch announced the discovery of the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis.

The Knights of Columbus was established.

Jesse James was shot in the back of the head and killed by Robert Ford.

A cyclone in the Arabian Sea caused flooding in Bombay harbor, leaving about 100,000 dead.

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Assassin Charles Guiteau died by hanging. Guiteau assassinated President James A. Garfield on July 2. He had a history of mental illness and was nicknamed “Charles Gitout.”

The U.S. Congress passed a new Immigration Act that stated that a 50 cents tax would be levied on all immigrants landing at United States ports. The money collected was to be used to defray the expenses of regulating immigration and for the care of immigrants after landing. The legislation also gave powers to the authorities to deny entry to “convicts (except those convicted of political offenses), lunatics, idiots and persons likely to become public charges.” The head tax money was also used to pay the federal immigration agents, and independent immigration agencies throughout the United States.

Thomas Edison flipped the switch to the first commercial electrical power plant in history, lighting one square mile of lower Manhattan.

Standard Oil of New Jersey was established.

The first United States Labor Day parade was held in New York City.

The Nickel Plate Railroad opened for business.

Franklin Leslie shot Billy Claiborne dead in the streets of Tombstone, Ariz.

The Personal Liberty League was established to oppose the temperance movement in the United States.

Carolyn Merrick was elected president of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union.

Popular songs were: “Goodbye, My Lover, Goodbye” and “The Skaters’ Waltz.”

This was the year of the dedication of Hearthstone House, in Appleton, Wisc.; the first residential building to be powered by a centrally located hydroelectric station using the Edison system.

Lucy the Elephant, a six-story elephant-shaped building was built. It was constructed of wood and tin sheeting by James V. Lafferty in Margate City, N.J., 2 miles south of Atlantic City, in an effort to sell real estate and attract tourism. The building stood 65-feet high, 60-feet long, and 18-feet wide, weighed about 90-tons, made of nearly one million pieces of wood. She was sold to new owners a few years later.

The Gotthard Tunnel was opened to traffic in Switzerland.

A narrow gauge Catskill Mountain Railway opened to carry passengers from Hudson River steamboats to connections at Palenville, New York to the Catskill Mountain House destination resort.

The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, later to become part of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad, building westward from Albuquerque, New Mexico, reached Canyon Diablo, Arizona.

John L. Sullivan defeated Paddy Ryan in nine rounds at Mississippi City to claim the Heavyweight Championship of America.

Dr. Ernst Werner von Siemens ran his first trolley bus, “Elektromote” in a Berlin, Germany suburb.

Swimming dresses were popular this year.

Can you guess this year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1938. Congratulations to Richard Ayer of Elbert, Colo., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.

This year P.T. Barnum purchased the elephant Jumbo.

Polygamy was made a felony by the Edmunds Act passed by the U.S. Congress.

Robert Koch announced the discovery of the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis.

The Knights of Columbus was established.

Jesse James was shot in the back of the head and killed by Robert Ford.

A cyclone in the Arabian Sea caused flooding in Bombay harbor, leaving about 100,000 dead.

Assassin Charles Guiteau died by hanging. Guiteau assassinated President James A. Garfield on July 2. He had a history of mental illness and was nicknamed “Charles Gitout.”

The U.S. Congress passed a new Immigration Act that stated that a 50 cents tax would be levied on all immigrants landing at United States ports. The money collected was to be used to defray the expenses of regulating immigration and for the care of immigrants after landing. The legislation also gave powers to the authorities to deny entry to “convicts (except those convicted of political offenses), lunatics, idiots and persons likely to become public charges.” The head tax money was also used to pay the federal immigration agents, and independent immigration agencies throughout the United States.

Thomas Edison flipped the switch to the first commercial electrical power plant in history, lighting one square mile of lower Manhattan.

Standard Oil of New Jersey was established.

The first United States Labor Day parade was held in New York City.

The Nickel Plate Railroad opened for business.

Franklin Leslie shot Billy Claiborne dead in the streets of Tombstone, Ariz.

The Personal Liberty League was established to oppose the temperance movement in the United States.

Carolyn Merrick was elected president of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union.

Popular songs were: “Goodbye, My Lover, Goodbye” and “The Skaters’ Waltz.”

This was the year of the dedication of Hearthstone House, in Appleton, Wisc.; the first residential building to be powered by a centrally located hydroelectric station using the Edison system.

Lucy the Elephant, a six-story elephant-shaped building was built. It was constructed of wood and tin sheeting by James V. Lafferty in Margate City, N.J., 2 miles south of Atlantic City, in an effort to sell real estate and attract tourism. The building stood 65-feet high, 60-feet long, and 18-feet wide, weighed about 90-tons, made of nearly one million pieces of wood. She was sold to new owners a few years later.

The Gotthard Tunnel was opened to traffic in Switzerland.

A narrow gauge Catskill Mountain Railway opened to carry passengers from Hudson River steamboats to connections at Palenville, New York to the Catskill Mountain House destination resort.

The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, later to become part of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad, building westward from Albuquerque, New Mexico, reached Canyon Diablo, Arizona.

John L. Sullivan defeated Paddy Ryan in nine rounds at Mississippi City to claim the Heavyweight Championship of America.

Dr. Ernst Werner von Siemens ran his first trolley bus, “Elektromote” in a Berlin, Germany suburb.

Swimming dresses were popular this year.

Can you guess this year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1938. Congratulations to Richard Ayer of Elbert, Colo., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.