Can You Guess the Year? 9-27-10 | TheFencePost.com

Can You Guess the Year? 9-27-10

Article and artwork by Dorothy Miller
Lochbuie, Colo.

Lawn Chair Larry flew above Long Beach, Calif., in a lawn chair with weather balloons attached.

A brutal cold snap sent temperatures to all-time record lows in cities throughout the Midwestern United States.

Shortly after takeoff, Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into Washington, D.C.’s 14th Street Bridge and fell into the Potomac River, killing 78. On the same day, a Washington Metro train derailed to the north, killing three. It was that system’s first fatal accident.

American guitarist Randy Rhoads of the Ozzy Osbourne band died in a plane crash.

A ground-breaking ceremony for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was held in Washington, D.C.

The 54th Academy Awards, hosted by Johnny Carson, were held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, Calif. “Chariots of Fire” won Best Picture and three other Academy Awards.

In April a blizzard dumped 1 to 2 feet of snow on the northeastern United States, closing schools and businesses, snarling traffic, and canceling several major league baseball games.

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A crowd of over 100,000 attended the first day of the World’s Fair in Knoxville, Tenn. The fair was kicked off with an address by President Ronald Reagan. Over 11 million people attended the fair during its 6-month run. The Sunsphere, a 266-foot steel tower topped with a five-story gold globe, was built.

The Weather Channel aired on cable television for the first time.

A Unabomber bomb exploded in the computer science department at Vanderbilt University; secretary Janet Smith was injured.

Spanish priest Juan Maria Fernandez Krohn tried to stab Pope John Paul II with a bayonet during the latter’s pilgrimage to the shrine at Fatima.

Braniff International Airways was declared bankrupt and ceased all flights.

Larry Walters and his girlfriend, Carol Van Deusen, purchased 45, 8-foot weather balloons and obtained helium tanks from California Toy Time Balloons. They attached them to a lawn chair. Walters, a.k.a. Lawn Chair Larry flew 16,000 feet above Long Beach, Calif., in a lawn chair with weather balloons attached. After 45 minutes in the sky, Walters shot several balloons, and then accidentally dropped his pellet gun overboard. He descended slowly, until the balloons’ dangling cables got caught in a power line, causing a blackout in a Long Beach neighborhood for 20 minutes. Walters was able to climb to the ground.

A regional safety inspector reportedly said, “We know he broke some part of the Federal Aviation Act, and as soon as we decide which part it is, some type of charge will be filed. If he had a pilot’s license, we’d suspend that. But he doesn’t.” Walters was initially fined $4,000 for violations under U.S. Federal Aviation Regulations, including operating an aircraft within an airport traffic area “without establishing and maintaining two-way communications with the control tower.” Walters appealed, and the fine was reduced to $1,500. A charge of operating a “civil aircraft for which there is not currently in effect an airworthiness certificate” was dropped, as it was not applicable to this class of aircraft.

Walters commented, “If the FAA was around when the Wright Brothers were testing their aircraft, they would never have been able to make their first flight at Kitty Hawk.”

Intruder Michael Fagan visited Queen Elizabeth II in her bedroom for a chat.

The Reverend Sun Myung Moon was sentenced to 18 months in prison and fined $25,000 for tax fraud and conspiracy to obstruct justice.

On a movie set, “The Twilight Zone” actor Vic Morrow and two child actors died in a helicopter stunt accident.

In Orlando, Fla., Walt Disney World opened the second largest theme park, EPCOT Center, to the public for the first time.

A gasoline or petrol tanker exploded in the Salang Tunnel in Afghanistan, killing at least 2,000 people.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C., after a march to its site by thousands of Vietnam War veterans.

Michael Jackson released “Thriller,” the biggest selling album of all time.

The first U.S. execution by lethal injection was carried out in Texas.

Time Magazine’s Man of the Year was given for the first time to a non-human, the computer.

Ozzy Osbourne bit the head off a live bat thrown at him during a performance in Des Moines, Iowa. He thought it was rubber.

Comedian and Blues Brother, John Belushi, was found dead of an apparent drug overdose in the Chateau Marmont Hotel in Los Angeles, Calif.

Professional wrestler Jerry Lawler slapped actor Andy Kaufman in the face on NBC’s Late Night with David Letterman. Kaufman responded by throwing coffee and shouting profanities at Lawler. The incident was later revealed to be staged.

Can you guess the year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1947. Congratulations to John Gubbins of Littleton, Colo., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.

A brutal cold snap sent temperatures to all-time record lows in cities throughout the Midwestern United States.

Shortly after takeoff, Air Florida Flight 90 crashed into Washington, D.C.’s 14th Street Bridge and fell into the Potomac River, killing 78. On the same day, a Washington Metro train derailed to the north, killing three. It was that system’s first fatal accident.

American guitarist Randy Rhoads of the Ozzy Osbourne band died in a plane crash.

A ground-breaking ceremony for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was held in Washington, D.C.

The 54th Academy Awards, hosted by Johnny Carson, were held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, Calif. “Chariots of Fire” won Best Picture and three other Academy Awards.

In April a blizzard dumped 1 to 2 feet of snow on the northeastern United States, closing schools and businesses, snarling traffic, and canceling several major league baseball games.

A crowd of over 100,000 attended the first day of the World’s Fair in Knoxville, Tenn. The fair was kicked off with an address by President Ronald Reagan. Over 11 million people attended the fair during its 6-month run. The Sunsphere, a 266-foot steel tower topped with a five-story gold globe, was built.

The Weather Channel aired on cable television for the first time.

A Unabomber bomb exploded in the computer science department at Vanderbilt University; secretary Janet Smith was injured.

Spanish priest Juan Maria Fernandez Krohn tried to stab Pope John Paul II with a bayonet during the latter’s pilgrimage to the shrine at Fatima.

Braniff International Airways was declared bankrupt and ceased all flights.

Larry Walters and his girlfriend, Carol Van Deusen, purchased 45, 8-foot weather balloons and obtained helium tanks from California Toy Time Balloons. They attached them to a lawn chair. Walters, a.k.a. Lawn Chair Larry flew 16,000 feet above Long Beach, Calif., in a lawn chair with weather balloons attached. After 45 minutes in the sky, Walters shot several balloons, and then accidentally dropped his pellet gun overboard. He descended slowly, until the balloons’ dangling cables got caught in a power line, causing a blackout in a Long Beach neighborhood for 20 minutes. Walters was able to climb to the ground.

A regional safety inspector reportedly said, “We know he broke some part of the Federal Aviation Act, and as soon as we decide which part it is, some type of charge will be filed. If he had a pilot’s license, we’d suspend that. But he doesn’t.” Walters was initially fined $4,000 for violations under U.S. Federal Aviation Regulations, including operating an aircraft within an airport traffic area “without establishing and maintaining two-way communications with the control tower.” Walters appealed, and the fine was reduced to $1,500. A charge of operating a “civil aircraft for which there is not currently in effect an airworthiness certificate” was dropped, as it was not applicable to this class of aircraft.

Walters commented, “If the FAA was around when the Wright Brothers were testing their aircraft, they would never have been able to make their first flight at Kitty Hawk.”

Intruder Michael Fagan visited Queen Elizabeth II in her bedroom for a chat.

The Reverend Sun Myung Moon was sentenced to 18 months in prison and fined $25,000 for tax fraud and conspiracy to obstruct justice.

On a movie set, “The Twilight Zone” actor Vic Morrow and two child actors died in a helicopter stunt accident.

In Orlando, Fla., Walt Disney World opened the second largest theme park, EPCOT Center, to the public for the first time.

A gasoline or petrol tanker exploded in the Salang Tunnel in Afghanistan, killing at least 2,000 people.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C., after a march to its site by thousands of Vietnam War veterans.

Michael Jackson released “Thriller,” the biggest selling album of all time.

The first U.S. execution by lethal injection was carried out in Texas.

Time Magazine’s Man of the Year was given for the first time to a non-human, the computer.

Ozzy Osbourne bit the head off a live bat thrown at him during a performance in Des Moines, Iowa. He thought it was rubber.

Comedian and Blues Brother, John Belushi, was found dead of an apparent drug overdose in the Chateau Marmont Hotel in Los Angeles, Calif.

Professional wrestler Jerry Lawler slapped actor Andy Kaufman in the face on NBC’s Late Night with David Letterman. Kaufman responded by throwing coffee and shouting profanities at Lawler. The incident was later revealed to be staged.

Can you guess the year?

***

Do you know what year these events happened? If you do, send your answer to the Fence Post Guess the Year Contest, P.O. Box 1690, Greeley, Colo., 80632.

***

The answer to last month’s Guess the Year Quiz was 1947. Congratulations to John Gubbins of Littleton, Colo., for being selected our prize winner. You can expect to receive $10 by the 20th of next month.