Celebrate the County Fair | TheFencePost.com

Celebrate the County Fair

Beth Gibbons
Crawford, Neb.

Mitchel Mansfield, son of Hughson and Coleen Mansfield, busily cleaning after livestock at the Dawes County Fair.

Our Dawes County fairground facilities are locked and shuttered for months. They may be visited by passing birds and possibly an occasional stray animal looking for a meal. Few humans are around to enjoy their existence. There are some well planned training activities but with limited numbers.

Once a year during early August, the buildings and grassy fields begin roaring to life. They are fueled by the 4-H Style Review and a variety of many youngsters’ activities. There will be kids, 4-H animals, home-arts exhibits, rodeos and a free feed for the public. It’s like all the holidays wrapped in a big noisy package waiting to be shared. Evenings are planned with an assortment of challenges for teams.

Under the protection from a blazing sun or an occasional rain shower, adults see the exhibits by walking inside up and down the isles looking on counters and on the walls to view clothes constructed, pictures taken, animals, babies, exhibits of all kinds and friends not seen since last year. The fairgrounds become a wonderland of trampled grass or some mudholes, but a gateway to viewing so many interesting things. We look forward to viewing the work of our neighbors and friends throughout the buildings.

We meet some friends we haven’t seen since who knows when. We greet new family additions and admire them as well as the school exhibits. Our Centennial farms and outstanding farmers and ranchers are recognized too.

Are county fairs relics of a bygone era, throwbacks to a time when agriculture ruled the nation, or maybe what this country needs now … simpler pleasures? We need an after harvest reprieve to see those we have missed while doing the months of mundane work to make an agricultural living.

Grab your grandchild’s hand, your camera and share a new appreciation for the hard work the fair workers do to make each year a grand event. Let’s celebrate the county fair wherever you are located.

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Our Dawes County fairground facilities are locked and shuttered for months. They may be visited by passing birds and possibly an occasional stray animal looking for a meal. Few humans are around to enjoy their existence. There are some well planned training activities but with limited numbers.

Once a year during early August, the buildings and grassy fields begin roaring to life. They are fueled by the 4-H Style Review and a variety of many youngsters’ activities. There will be kids, 4-H animals, home-arts exhibits, rodeos and a free feed for the public. It’s like all the holidays wrapped in a big noisy package waiting to be shared. Evenings are planned with an assortment of challenges for teams.

Under the protection from a blazing sun or an occasional rain shower, adults see the exhibits by walking inside up and down the isles looking on counters and on the walls to view clothes constructed, pictures taken, animals, babies, exhibits of all kinds and friends not seen since last year. The fairgrounds become a wonderland of trampled grass or some mudholes, but a gateway to viewing so many interesting things. We look forward to viewing the work of our neighbors and friends throughout the buildings.

We meet some friends we haven’t seen since who knows when. We greet new family additions and admire them as well as the school exhibits. Our Centennial farms and outstanding farmers and ranchers are recognized too.

Are county fairs relics of a bygone era, throwbacks to a time when agriculture ruled the nation, or maybe what this country needs now … simpler pleasures? We need an after harvest reprieve to see those we have missed while doing the months of mundane work to make an agricultural living.

Grab your grandchild’s hand, your camera and share a new appreciation for the hard work the fair workers do to make each year a grand event. Let’s celebrate the county fair wherever you are located.

Our Dawes County fairground facilities are locked and shuttered for months. They may be visited by passing birds and possibly an occasional stray animal looking for a meal. Few humans are around to enjoy their existence. There are some well planned training activities but with limited numbers.

Once a year during early August, the buildings and grassy fields begin roaring to life. They are fueled by the 4-H Style Review and a variety of many youngsters’ activities. There will be kids, 4-H animals, home-arts exhibits, rodeos and a free feed for the public. It’s like all the holidays wrapped in a big noisy package waiting to be shared. Evenings are planned with an assortment of challenges for teams.

Under the protection from a blazing sun or an occasional rain shower, adults see the exhibits by walking inside up and down the isles looking on counters and on the walls to view clothes constructed, pictures taken, animals, babies, exhibits of all kinds and friends not seen since last year. The fairgrounds become a wonderland of trampled grass or some mudholes, but a gateway to viewing so many interesting things. We look forward to viewing the work of our neighbors and friends throughout the buildings.

We meet some friends we haven’t seen since who knows when. We greet new family additions and admire them as well as the school exhibits. Our Centennial farms and outstanding farmers and ranchers are recognized too.

Are county fairs relics of a bygone era, throwbacks to a time when agriculture ruled the nation, or maybe what this country needs now … simpler pleasures? We need an after harvest reprieve to see those we have missed while doing the months of mundane work to make an agricultural living.

Grab your grandchild’s hand, your camera and share a new appreciation for the hard work the fair workers do to make each year a grand event. Let’s celebrate the county fair wherever you are located.