Championship Rodeo at Greeley Stampede Explodes for Another Year | TheFencePost.com

Championship Rodeo at Greeley Stampede Explodes for Another Year

Lincoln RogersWyoming Cowboy Merritt Smith earned 74 points aboard Silver Moon to nail down a third place finish in the saddle bronc average.

Billed as “The World’s Largest Fourth of July Rodeo,” the Greeley Stampede’s championship round of rodeo action brought together top names and first class stock for yet another year of fireworks inside the arena.

Offering nearly $400,000 in total prize money, it was one of the top stops during late June and early July’s jam-packed run of high paying rodeos, nicknamed within the industry as “Cowboy Christmas.” If a competitor gets on a roll around that time of year, they can pile up enough cash to help them qualify for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in December. Of course, earning about $10,000 in Greeley can help in a major way.

Well-known past competitors have remarked about Greeley’s importance on the rodeo schedule, calling it a can’t miss for those hoping to corral a herd of paychecks and get a running start into the all important summer season.

“I just pick some of my favorites I want to come to … and Greeley is one,” offered 19-time NFR saddle bronc qualifier Rod Hay a few summers back. Hay sits atop the standings this year, but injury kept him out of the rush of Cowboy Christmas. “I’ve always liked this rodeo.”

“It’s such a huge rodeo,” said Colorado barrel racer Shali Lord when she qualified for the championship round several years ago. “It’s one of the biggest over the Fourth of July. They get a lot of the top contestants … and they try to make it one of the top rodeos over the Fourth. All around, (it’s) great.”

Not content to rest on its laurels, the 88-year-old Stampede strives to put on a big show every Independence Day holiday and 2010’s championship round was no exception. The first contestant out of the chute was Oklahoma cowboy Justin McDaniel, who set the tone with a near 90-point score aboard Burns Rodeo Company’s Forward Motion, a big dark horse with blue eyes and white socks. The bareback event, always wild and wooly, pleased the crowd with three-time PRCA world champion Will Lowe producing 87 points aboard Wonderland to pocket his first-ever Greeley title and payouts totaling more than $10,000.

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“I knew I had to do well,” recalled Lowe a few days afterward. “The Fourth is a busy time of year and I was sitting down there (in the standings) a little ways. I needed to make some money.”

Asked regarding his thoughts before the winning ride, Lowe’s answer was confident.

“It’s the same on all the horses I get on. I’m trying to do my best and I’m planning on being 90 (points) every time,” he said with a laugh. “It doesn’t always work out like that, but I’m nodding my head intending to do 90 on everything.”

More roughstock action kept the crowd entertained, with Jeff Willert grabbing the saddle bronc title on a day that saw just four qualified rides. Willert had little time to notice how any of his fellow competitors were doing, however, since his attention was focused on an ornery bronc giving him trouble.

“The horse I had (Little Bubbles) was kind of a chute fighter and he was acting crazy in the chute,” described Willert of his pre-ride experience. “I was just trying to get my saddle pulled and making sure nothing was broke and stuff like that. I don’t think I even watched one bronc go out. My mind wasn’t even on the rodeo, it was just on making sure my saddle was all right,” he continued with laughter at his own predicament. “But it went pretty good.”

It went well enough for him to take home over $10,000 for his work in Colorado, a victory he said will also pay off in confidence.

“When you’re doing good it feels like you kind of get on a roll and your confidence gets a little better,” offered Willert about the psychology of winning. “Confidence is what makes you ride a lot better. I’m looking forward to the rest of the summer and hopefully it keeps going good.”

Another cowboy looking forward to the rest of the summer, thanks to the Greeley Stampede, is a rookie bull rider from Florida. Dylan Werner surprised the large crowd with an 87-point ride on Big Spin, earning about $9,000 for his efforts and a chance to finally get some much needed rest.

“I drove all night from Cody and I was pretty dang tired,” Werner revealed about his physical condition before getting on his bull. “I tried getting a little bit of sleep in my car, but I couldn’t go to sleep so I just went out to eat and kind of just stayed awake. Really, I was just ready to go get some sleep somewhere.”

Not only was he weary; he was also dealing with a hamstring issue, which the Justin medical team treated beforehand to give him a fighting chance at a buckle. Werner proceeded to take that buckle and the boost in his first year expectations that came along with it.

“It was a big relief because I was wondering if I just needed to go home there for a little while, since I hadn’t made a check,” described Werner of his feelings at winning a big event. “The bull I had, I kind of wanted to get on him even though he turned back into that leg that was giving me a little bit of trouble. I felt I had to ride him, still. I felt like I was going to go good, before I did good, if you know what I mean.”

It wasn’t just fans and cowboys that enjoyed the Fourth of July rodeo action; behind the scenes personnel also had praise for the venue’s 2010 western brand of entertainment.

“It might have been the best rodeo we’ve had in a long time,” declared veteran Greeley Stampede stock contractor Bennie Beutler of Beutler and Son Rodeo Company. “Overall, it’s been an excellent rodeo (and) not because we’ve put it on,” he added with humility. “I’ve had the Mosbruckers helping me and a couple of other (rodeo stock contractors). I’m very tickled with the stock and they way they’ve performed.”

Although fireworks usually rule the day on July Fourth, the explosive combination of Greeley’s top names, good stock, solid performances and big paychecks made everyone’s face light up just the same.

Billed as “The World’s Largest Fourth of July Rodeo,” the Greeley Stampede’s championship round of rodeo action brought together top names and first class stock for yet another year of fireworks inside the arena.

Offering nearly $400,000 in total prize money, it was one of the top stops during late June and early July’s jam-packed run of high paying rodeos, nicknamed within the industry as “Cowboy Christmas.” If a competitor gets on a roll around that time of year, they can pile up enough cash to help them qualify for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in December. Of course, earning about $10,000 in Greeley can help in a major way.

Well-known past competitors have remarked about Greeley’s importance on the rodeo schedule, calling it a can’t miss for those hoping to corral a herd of paychecks and get a running start into the all important summer season.

“I just pick some of my favorites I want to come to … and Greeley is one,” offered 19-time NFR saddle bronc qualifier Rod Hay a few summers back. Hay sits atop the standings this year, but injury kept him out of the rush of Cowboy Christmas. “I’ve always liked this rodeo.”

“It’s such a huge rodeo,” said Colorado barrel racer Shali Lord when she qualified for the championship round several years ago. “It’s one of the biggest over the Fourth of July. They get a lot of the top contestants … and they try to make it one of the top rodeos over the Fourth. All around, (it’s) great.”

Not content to rest on its laurels, the 88-year-old Stampede strives to put on a big show every Independence Day holiday and 2010’s championship round was no exception. The first contestant out of the chute was Oklahoma cowboy Justin McDaniel, who set the tone with a near 90-point score aboard Burns Rodeo Company’s Forward Motion, a big dark horse with blue eyes and white socks. The bareback event, always wild and wooly, pleased the crowd with three-time PRCA world champion Will Lowe producing 87 points aboard Wonderland to pocket his first-ever Greeley title and payouts totaling more than $10,000.

“I knew I had to do well,” recalled Lowe a few days afterward. “The Fourth is a busy time of year and I was sitting down there (in the standings) a little ways. I needed to make some money.”

Asked regarding his thoughts before the winning ride, Lowe’s answer was confident.

“It’s the same on all the horses I get on. I’m trying to do my best and I’m planning on being 90 (points) every time,” he said with a laugh. “It doesn’t always work out like that, but I’m nodding my head intending to do 90 on everything.”

More roughstock action kept the crowd entertained, with Jeff Willert grabbing the saddle bronc title on a day that saw just four qualified rides. Willert had little time to notice how any of his fellow competitors were doing, however, since his attention was focused on an ornery bronc giving him trouble.

“The horse I had (Little Bubbles) was kind of a chute fighter and he was acting crazy in the chute,” described Willert of his pre-ride experience. “I was just trying to get my saddle pulled and making sure nothing was broke and stuff like that. I don’t think I even watched one bronc go out. My mind wasn’t even on the rodeo, it was just on making sure my saddle was all right,” he continued with laughter at his own predicament. “But it went pretty good.”

It went well enough for him to take home over $10,000 for his work in Colorado, a victory he said will also pay off in confidence.

“When you’re doing good it feels like you kind of get on a roll and your confidence gets a little better,” offered Willert about the psychology of winning. “Confidence is what makes you ride a lot better. I’m looking forward to the rest of the summer and hopefully it keeps going good.”

Another cowboy looking forward to the rest of the summer, thanks to the Greeley Stampede, is a rookie bull rider from Florida. Dylan Werner surprised the large crowd with an 87-point ride on Big Spin, earning about $9,000 for his efforts and a chance to finally get some much needed rest.

“I drove all night from Cody and I was pretty dang tired,” Werner revealed about his physical condition before getting on his bull. “I tried getting a little bit of sleep in my car, but I couldn’t go to sleep so I just went out to eat and kind of just stayed awake. Really, I was just ready to go get some sleep somewhere.”

Not only was he weary; he was also dealing with a hamstring issue, which the Justin medical team treated beforehand to give him a fighting chance at a buckle. Werner proceeded to take that buckle and the boost in his first year expectations that came along with it.

“It was a big relief because I was wondering if I just needed to go home there for a little while, since I hadn’t made a check,” described Werner of his feelings at winning a big event. “The bull I had, I kind of wanted to get on him even though he turned back into that leg that was giving me a little bit of trouble. I felt I had to ride him, still. I felt like I was going to go good, before I did good, if you know what I mean.”

It wasn’t just fans and cowboys that enjoyed the Fourth of July rodeo action; behind the scenes personnel also had praise for the venue’s 2010 western brand of entertainment.

“It might have been the best rodeo we’ve had in a long time,” declared veteran Greeley Stampede stock contractor Bennie Beutler of Beutler and Son Rodeo Company. “Overall, it’s been an excellent rodeo (and) not because we’ve put it on,” he added with humility. “I’ve had the Mosbruckers helping me and a couple of other (rodeo stock contractors). I’m very tickled with the stock and they way they’ve performed.”

Although fireworks usually rule the day on July Fourth, the explosive combination of Greeley’s top names, good stock, solid performances and big paychecks made everyone’s face light up just the same.

Billed as “The World’s Largest Fourth of July Rodeo,” the Greeley Stampede’s championship round of rodeo action brought together top names and first class stock for yet another year of fireworks inside the arena.

Offering nearly $400,000 in total prize money, it was one of the top stops during late June and early July’s jam-packed run of high paying rodeos, nicknamed within the industry as “Cowboy Christmas.” If a competitor gets on a roll around that time of year, they can pile up enough cash to help them qualify for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in December. Of course, earning about $10,000 in Greeley can help in a major way.

Well-known past competitors have remarked about Greeley’s importance on the rodeo schedule, calling it a can’t miss for those hoping to corral a herd of paychecks and get a running start into the all important summer season.

“I just pick some of my favorites I want to come to … and Greeley is one,” offered 19-time NFR saddle bronc qualifier Rod Hay a few summers back. Hay sits atop the standings this year, but injury kept him out of the rush of Cowboy Christmas. “I’ve always liked this rodeo.”

“It’s such a huge rodeo,” said Colorado barrel racer Shali Lord when she qualified for the championship round several years ago. “It’s one of the biggest over the Fourth of July. They get a lot of the top contestants … and they try to make it one of the top rodeos over the Fourth. All around, (it’s) great.”

Not content to rest on its laurels, the 88-year-old Stampede strives to put on a big show every Independence Day holiday and 2010’s championship round was no exception. The first contestant out of the chute was Oklahoma cowboy Justin McDaniel, who set the tone with a near 90-point score aboard Burns Rodeo Company’s Forward Motion, a big dark horse with blue eyes and white socks. The bareback event, always wild and wooly, pleased the crowd with three-time PRCA world champion Will Lowe producing 87 points aboard Wonderland to pocket his first-ever Greeley title and payouts totaling more than $10,000.

“I knew I had to do well,” recalled Lowe a few days afterward. “The Fourth is a busy time of year and I was sitting down there (in the standings) a little ways. I needed to make some money.”

Asked regarding his thoughts before the winning ride, Lowe’s answer was confident.

“It’s the same on all the horses I get on. I’m trying to do my best and I’m planning on being 90 (points) every time,” he said with a laugh. “It doesn’t always work out like that, but I’m nodding my head intending to do 90 on everything.”

More roughstock action kept the crowd entertained, with Jeff Willert grabbing the saddle bronc title on a day that saw just four qualified rides. Willert had little time to notice how any of his fellow competitors were doing, however, since his attention was focused on an ornery bronc giving him trouble.

“The horse I had (Little Bubbles) was kind of a chute fighter and he was acting crazy in the chute,” described Willert of his pre-ride experience. “I was just trying to get my saddle pulled and making sure nothing was broke and stuff like that. I don’t think I even watched one bronc go out. My mind wasn’t even on the rodeo, it was just on making sure my saddle was all right,” he continued with laughter at his own predicament. “But it went pretty good.”

It went well enough for him to take home over $10,000 for his work in Colorado, a victory he said will also pay off in confidence.

“When you’re doing good it feels like you kind of get on a roll and your confidence gets a little better,” offered Willert about the psychology of winning. “Confidence is what makes you ride a lot better. I’m looking forward to the rest of the summer and hopefully it keeps going good.”

Another cowboy looking forward to the rest of the summer, thanks to the Greeley Stampede, is a rookie bull rider from Florida. Dylan Werner surprised the large crowd with an 87-point ride on Big Spin, earning about $9,000 for his efforts and a chance to finally get some much needed rest.

“I drove all night from Cody and I was pretty dang tired,” Werner revealed about his physical condition before getting on his bull. “I tried getting a little bit of sleep in my car, but I couldn’t go to sleep so I just went out to eat and kind of just stayed awake. Really, I was just ready to go get some sleep somewhere.”

Not only was he weary; he was also dealing with a hamstring issue, which the Justin medical team treated beforehand to give him a fighting chance at a buckle. Werner proceeded to take that buckle and the boost in his first year expectations that came along with it.

“It was a big relief because I was wondering if I just needed to go home there for a little while, since I hadn’t made a check,” described Werner of his feelings at winning a big event. “The bull I had, I kind of wanted to get on him even though he turned back into that leg that was giving me a little bit of trouble. I felt I had to ride him, still. I felt like I was going to go good, before I did good, if you know what I mean.”

It wasn’t just fans and cowboys that enjoyed the Fourth of July rodeo action; behind the scenes personnel also had praise for the venue’s 2010 western brand of entertainment.

“It might have been the best rodeo we’ve had in a long time,” declared veteran Greeley Stampede stock contractor Bennie Beutler of Beutler and Son Rodeo Company. “Overall, it’s been an excellent rodeo (and) not because we’ve put it on,” he added with humility. “I’ve had the Mosbruckers helping me and a couple of other (rodeo stock contractors). I’m very tickled with the stock and they way they’ve performed.”

Although fireworks usually rule the day on July Fourth, the explosive combination of Greeley’s top names, good stock, solid performances and big paychecks made everyone’s face light up just the same.

Billed as “The World’s Largest Fourth of July Rodeo,” the Greeley Stampede’s championship round of rodeo action brought together top names and first class stock for yet another year of fireworks inside the arena.

Offering nearly $400,000 in total prize money, it was one of the top stops during late June and early July’s jam-packed run of high paying rodeos, nicknamed within the industry as “Cowboy Christmas.” If a competitor gets on a roll around that time of year, they can pile up enough cash to help them qualify for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in December. Of course, earning about $10,000 in Greeley can help in a major way.

Well-known past competitors have remarked about Greeley’s importance on the rodeo schedule, calling it a can’t miss for those hoping to corral a herd of paychecks and get a running start into the all important summer season.

“I just pick some of my favorites I want to come to … and Greeley is one,” offered 19-time NFR saddle bronc qualifier Rod Hay a few summers back. Hay sits atop the standings this year, but injury kept him out of the rush of Cowboy Christmas. “I’ve always liked this rodeo.”

“It’s such a huge rodeo,” said Colorado barrel racer Shali Lord when she qualified for the championship round several years ago. “It’s one of the biggest over the Fourth of July. They get a lot of the top contestants … and they try to make it one of the top rodeos over the Fourth. All around, (it’s) great.”

Not content to rest on its laurels, the 88-year-old Stampede strives to put on a big show every Independence Day holiday and 2010’s championship round was no exception. The first contestant out of the chute was Oklahoma cowboy Justin McDaniel, who set the tone with a near 90-point score aboard Burns Rodeo Company’s Forward Motion, a big dark horse with blue eyes and white socks. The bareback event, always wild and wooly, pleased the crowd with three-time PRCA world champion Will Lowe producing 87 points aboard Wonderland to pocket his first-ever Greeley title and payouts totaling more than $10,000.

“I knew I had to do well,” recalled Lowe a few days afterward. “The Fourth is a busy time of year and I was sitting down there (in the standings) a little ways. I needed to make some money.”

Asked regarding his thoughts before the winning ride, Lowe’s answer was confident.

“It’s the same on all the horses I get on. I’m trying to do my best and I’m planning on being 90 (points) every time,” he said with a laugh. “It doesn’t always work out like that, but I’m nodding my head intending to do 90 on everything.”

More roughstock action kept the crowd entertained, with Jeff Willert grabbing the saddle bronc title on a day that saw just four qualified rides. Willert had little time to notice how any of his fellow competitors were doing, however, since his attention was focused on an ornery bronc giving him trouble.

“The horse I had (Little Bubbles) was kind of a chute fighter and he was acting crazy in the chute,” described Willert of his pre-ride experience. “I was just trying to get my saddle pulled and making sure nothing was broke and stuff like that. I don’t think I even watched one bronc go out. My mind wasn’t even on the rodeo, it was just on making sure my saddle was all right,” he continued with laughter at his own predicament. “But it went pretty good.”

It went well enough for him to take home over $10,000 for his work in Colorado, a victory he said will also pay off in confidence.

“When you’re doing good it feels like you kind of get on a roll and your confidence gets a little better,” offered Willert about the psychology of winning. “Confidence is what makes you ride a lot better. I’m looking forward to the rest of the summer and hopefully it keeps going good.”

Another cowboy looking forward to the rest of the summer, thanks to the Greeley Stampede, is a rookie bull rider from Florida. Dylan Werner surprised the large crowd with an 87-point ride on Big Spin, earning about $9,000 for his efforts and a chance to finally get some much needed rest.

“I drove all night from Cody and I was pretty dang tired,” Werner revealed about his physical condition before getting on his bull. “I tried getting a little bit of sleep in my car, but I couldn’t go to sleep so I just went out to eat and kind of just stayed awake. Really, I was just ready to go get some sleep somewhere.”

Not only was he weary; he was also dealing with a hamstring issue, which the Justin medical team treated beforehand to give him a fighting chance at a buckle. Werner proceeded to take that buckle and the boost in his first year expectations that came along with it.

“It was a big relief because I was wondering if I just needed to go home there for a little while, since I hadn’t made a check,” described Werner of his feelings at winning a big event. “The bull I had, I kind of wanted to get on him even though he turned back into that leg that was giving me a little bit of trouble. I felt I had to ride him, still. I felt like I was going to go good, before I did good, if you know what I mean.”

It wasn’t just fans and cowboys that enjoyed the Fourth of July rodeo action; behind the scenes personnel also had praise for the venue’s 2010 western brand of entertainment.

“It might have been the best rodeo we’ve had in a long time,” declared veteran Greeley Stampede stock contractor Bennie Beutler of Beutler and Son Rodeo Company. “Overall, it’s been an excellent rodeo (and) not because we’ve put it on,” he added with humility. “I’ve had the Mosbruckers helping me and a couple of other (rodeo stock contractors). I’m very tickled with the stock and they way they’ve performed.”

Although fireworks usually rule the day on July Fourth, the explosive combination of Greeley’s top names, good stock, solid performances and big paychecks made everyone’s face light up just the same.

Billed as “The World’s Largest Fourth of July Rodeo,” the Greeley Stampede’s championship round of rodeo action brought together top names and first class stock for yet another year of fireworks inside the arena.

Offering nearly $400,000 in total prize money, it was one of the top stops during late June and early July’s jam-packed run of high paying rodeos, nicknamed within the industry as “Cowboy Christmas.” If a competitor gets on a roll around that time of year, they can pile up enough cash to help them qualify for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in December. Of course, earning about $10,000 in Greeley can help in a major way.

Well-known past competitors have remarked about Greeley’s importance on the rodeo schedule, calling it a can’t miss for those hoping to corral a herd of paychecks and get a running start into the all important summer season.

“I just pick some of my favorites I want to come to … and Greeley is one,” offered 19-time NFR saddle bronc qualifier Rod Hay a few summers back. Hay sits atop the standings this year, but injury kept him out of the rush of Cowboy Christmas. “I’ve always liked this rodeo.”

“It’s such a huge rodeo,” said Colorado barrel racer Shali Lord when she qualified for the championship round several years ago. “It’s one of the biggest over the Fourth of July. They get a lot of the top contestants … and they try to make it one of the top rodeos over the Fourth. All around, (it’s) great.”

Not content to rest on its laurels, the 88-year-old Stampede strives to put on a big show every Independence Day holiday and 2010’s championship round was no exception. The first contestant out of the chute was Oklahoma cowboy Justin McDaniel, who set the tone with a near 90-point score aboard Burns Rodeo Company’s Forward Motion, a big dark horse with blue eyes and white socks. The bareback event, always wild and wooly, pleased the crowd with three-time PRCA world champion Will Lowe producing 87 points aboard Wonderland to pocket his first-ever Greeley title and payouts totaling more than $10,000.

“I knew I had to do well,” recalled Lowe a few days afterward. “The Fourth is a busy time of year and I was sitting down there (in the standings) a little ways. I needed to make some money.”

Asked regarding his thoughts before the winning ride, Lowe’s answer was confident.

“It’s the same on all the horses I get on. I’m trying to do my best and I’m planning on being 90 (points) every time,” he said with a laugh. “It doesn’t always work out like that, but I’m nodding my head intending to do 90 on everything.”

More roughstock action kept the crowd entertained, with Jeff Willert grabbing the saddle bronc title on a day that saw just four qualified rides. Willert had little time to notice how any of his fellow competitors were doing, however, since his attention was focused on an ornery bronc giving him trouble.

“The horse I had (Little Bubbles) was kind of a chute fighter and he was acting crazy in the chute,” described Willert of his pre-ride experience. “I was just trying to get my saddle pulled and making sure nothing was broke and stuff like that. I don’t think I even watched one bronc go out. My mind wasn’t even on the rodeo, it was just on making sure my saddle was all right,” he continued with laughter at his own predicament. “But it went pretty good.”

It went well enough for him to take home over $10,000 for his work in Colorado, a victory he said will also pay off in confidence.

“When you’re doing good it feels like you kind of get on a roll and your confidence gets a little better,” offered Willert about the psychology of winning. “Confidence is what makes you ride a lot better. I’m looking forward to the rest of the summer and hopefully it keeps going good.”

Another cowboy looking forward to the rest of the summer, thanks to the Greeley Stampede, is a rookie bull rider from Florida. Dylan Werner surprised the large crowd with an 87-point ride on Big Spin, earning about $9,000 for his efforts and a chance to finally get some much needed rest.

“I drove all night from Cody and I was pretty dang tired,” Werner revealed about his physical condition before getting on his bull. “I tried getting a little bit of sleep in my car, but I couldn’t go to sleep so I just went out to eat and kind of just stayed awake. Really, I was just ready to go get some sleep somewhere.”

Not only was he weary; he was also dealing with a hamstring issue, which the Justin medical team treated beforehand to give him a fighting chance at a buckle. Werner proceeded to take that buckle and the boost in his first year expectations that came along with it.

“It was a big relief because I was wondering if I just needed to go home there for a little while, since I hadn’t made a check,” described Werner of his feelings at winning a big event. “The bull I had, I kind of wanted to get on him even though he turned back into that leg that was giving me a little bit of trouble. I felt I had to ride him, still. I felt like I was going to go good, before I did good, if you know what I mean.”

It wasn’t just fans and cowboys that enjoyed the Fourth of July rodeo action; behind the scenes personnel also had praise for the venue’s 2010 western brand of entertainment.

“It might have been the best rodeo we’ve had in a long time,” declared veteran Greeley Stampede stock contractor Bennie Beutler of Beutler and Son Rodeo Company. “Overall, it’s been an excellent rodeo (and) not because we’ve put it on,” he added with humility. “I’ve had the Mosbruckers helping me and a couple of other (rodeo stock contractors). I’m very tickled with the stock and they way they’ve performed.”

Although fireworks usually rule the day on July Fourth, the explosive combination of Greeley’s top names, good stock, solid performances and big paychecks made everyone’s face light up just the same.