Colorado Agriculture Hall of Fame | TheFencePost.com

Colorado Agriculture Hall of Fame

Kay Dreyer
Brighton, Colo.

Kay Dreyer2010 Colorado Agriculture Hall of Fame Inductee, John Matsushima and his son son Bob.

The Colorado Agriculture Hall of Fame Inductee’s included:

• John Matsushima, pioneered the process of stream flaking grains – a practice that helps to reduce the cost of beef production that continues to be used today in cattle feeding operations worldwide.

• Donald Norgren, honored for his long association with Hereford Cattle and the National Western Stock Show. Norgren, and his wife, Donna, were 1993 Colorado State University Livestock Leader award-winners.

• Jim Read, a former Colorado State University Extension agent serving Cheyenne, Prowers and Logan counties. Read used extensive research and demonstration plots to help improve farming practices for nearly every crop produced in Colorado.

• Andrew Mair, a Larimer County farmer who is being honored posthumously. Mair oversaw the Colorado Commodity Stabilization Service and represented Colorado and U.S. agriculture in over 40 countries on five continents serving or consulting with six presidential administrations.

Story courtesy of Colorado State University.

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The Colorado Agriculture Hall of Fame Inductee’s included:

• John Matsushima, pioneered the process of stream flaking grains – a practice that helps to reduce the cost of beef production that continues to be used today in cattle feeding operations worldwide.

• Donald Norgren, honored for his long association with Hereford Cattle and the National Western Stock Show. Norgren, and his wife, Donna, were 1993 Colorado State University Livestock Leader award-winners.

• Jim Read, a former Colorado State University Extension agent serving Cheyenne, Prowers and Logan counties. Read used extensive research and demonstration plots to help improve farming practices for nearly every crop produced in Colorado.

• Andrew Mair, a Larimer County farmer who is being honored posthumously. Mair oversaw the Colorado Commodity Stabilization Service and represented Colorado and U.S. agriculture in over 40 countries on five continents serving or consulting with six presidential administrations.

Story courtesy of Colorado State University.