Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo | TheFencePost.com

Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo

Cowboy Tell Good of the Black Cattle/Traingle Ranch team showed off the form that helped him win Top Hand for the competition.

Cowboys from working ranches throughout the west galloped into the small town of Hugo, Colo., to put on a present display of our country’s cattleman past in the ninth annual Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo, held over the weekend of June 25-26. The event was part of the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA), an organization dedicated to preserving the lifestyle of authentic working ranch cowboys and keeping our ranching heritage alive and well.

The event in Hugo – which brought together 14 teams vying for cash prizes along with a coveted automatic qualification to the WRCA World Championships in Amarillo, Texas – was put together by a dedicated crew of volunteers from the local community who take pride in offering the cowboy competition on a yearly basis.

“We just do it for the cowboys,” said Tina Waite, secretary of the rodeo and a part of the event since its inception. Waite’s husband is foreman of the nearby Withers Ranch, so the ranching lifestyle is close to her heart. “This used to be big cowboy country and it’s kind of gotten where it’s not so much. We like having cowboys in Hugo,” she added with conviction. “It’s about representing cowboys and keeping the history (here).”

The cowboys liked competing in Hugo just as much, and weren’t shy about saying so.

“We like coming up here, we do,” stated Mark Mitchell, owner of Crutch Ranch out of Texas, a 13,000 acre outfit running 400 cows and 40 head of horses. The personable Mitchell answered questions while watching other teams hard at work in the spacious outdoor arena of the Lincoln County Fairgrounds. “It’s cooler up here and we just like the weather,” he continued on the subject. “So we’ll come here and then we’re going to Colorado Springs next weekend (to compete in the Ride for the Brand Championship Rodeo). It’s a mini-vacation time.”

That mini-vacation for Crutch and his team included activities such as bronc riding, doctoring, branding, sorting, jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking. While bronc riding, sorting, doctoring and branding sound like reflections of a normal day on the ranch; the jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking competitions were a bit more hectic. Known as the “bull riding of ranch rodeo,” wild cow milking is pure spectacle for the fans and pure chaos for those involved. A rider ropes a large momma cow while three cowboys from his team chase her down and attempt to keep her in place as the rider dismounts and takes his rope off the horn of his saddle. Another team member then attempts to milk the cow into a beer bottle as everyone else holds on for dear life. Once enough milk is in the bottle to pour, the milker sprints to a judge and time is stopped. It’s a great example of the old saying, “If momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.”

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Jackpot trailer loading was yet another exhibition in controlled mayhem. First, a yearling was roped from horseback and then manhandled into the back of a trailer. With the yearling secure, two horses from the team were also loaded into the back of the trailer and the door latched. Immediately following, a mad scramble ensued as every team member piled inside the cab of the truck to stop the timers. Taking home top honors in the fun-filled event was the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team, who also managed to nail down an arena record time of 59.81 seconds in the process.

“Well, we set an arena record while we won that,” said a smiling Randy Peterson of the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team. “We’ve been coming here for the last several years and I knew we could do that; we just made it come through this year.”

Based in Kansas, Peterson and his crew drive 450 miles to compete in the Hugo contest. When asked what keeps them coming back every year, the personable cowboy was quick with a reply.

“We’re just trying to qualify for the world championships (in Amarillo),” he stated while watching awards being handed out after the completion of the rodeo.

Just one team managed to grab that Amarillo qualification by earning the highest average score throughout the two-day competition. The Wachob Ranch/TC Outfit (from Nebraska and South Dakota) not only received an invite to the WRCA world championships in November, they also snared an impressive load of custom champion buckles, certificates for new Resistol hats and $3,500 in prize money. All in all, it was a good haul for a weekend of cowboy competition in the middle of Colorado ranching country.

“It’s overwhelming, for sure,” said a happy Kacy Wachob, owner of the Wachob Ranch based in the Sandhills of Nebraska, when asked his thoughts on winning the competition and qualifying for the Amarillo world championships. “We made it down a few years ago to Amarillo and we’ve been wanting to get back. It came right down to the wire today. There were a lot of good teams here and it just, everything just kind of fell together with the points and everything.”

With some of the ranch rodeos taking place in big indoor arenas, Wachob was asked his thoughts on the experience of competing outdoors in the expansive Lincoln County Fairgrounds arena, which saw plenty of sunshine mixed with some rain over the weekend.

“It makes it more realistic,” he described with certainty. “It kind of feels like an everyday deal. If you’re out there and you’ve got to work cows and it’s raining, you’ve just got to deal with it. If it’s hot, you’ve got to deal with it,” the ranch owner emphasized. “They do a really good job here of making everybody feel at home.”

Not only did Wachob enjoy the competition’s facilities, the winning rancher also had praise for his fellow competitors.

“Oh, it was great,” he added with another big smile. “This is, to us, one of the toughest rodeos. A lot of these teams here have been to the (Amarillo) finals and we hope to see them down there again. This is a good rodeo, a fun rodeo, and we’ve been coming here forever. I like it.”

With nine years now in the bag, event organizers like the direction in which the ranch rodeo is headed. Although nearly half the population of small town Hugo already attends on an annual basis, they’re still aiming higher.

“It’s just grown every year, so that’s good,” summed up Waite about the rodeo committee’s efforts. “Our crowds have grown. We’ve always had a ranch horse show, most years. One year we had a benefit roping for Thompsons when the Thompson Ranch family got hurt, and our trade show has gotten bigger every year. We’ve just progressively gotten better at it.”

With a hard working committee and a load of can-do attitudes in place, it looks like 2011 may turn out to be a perfect 10 for the Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo.

For more information, please visit ColoradoChampionshipRanchRodeo.com.

Cowboys from working ranches throughout the west galloped into the small town of Hugo, Colo., to put on a present display of our country’s cattleman past in the ninth annual Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo, held over the weekend of June 25-26. The event was part of the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA), an organization dedicated to preserving the lifestyle of authentic working ranch cowboys and keeping our ranching heritage alive and well.

The event in Hugo – which brought together 14 teams vying for cash prizes along with a coveted automatic qualification to the WRCA World Championships in Amarillo, Texas – was put together by a dedicated crew of volunteers from the local community who take pride in offering the cowboy competition on a yearly basis.

“We just do it for the cowboys,” said Tina Waite, secretary of the rodeo and a part of the event since its inception. Waite’s husband is foreman of the nearby Withers Ranch, so the ranching lifestyle is close to her heart. “This used to be big cowboy country and it’s kind of gotten where it’s not so much. We like having cowboys in Hugo,” she added with conviction. “It’s about representing cowboys and keeping the history (here).”

The cowboys liked competing in Hugo just as much, and weren’t shy about saying so.

“We like coming up here, we do,” stated Mark Mitchell, owner of Crutch Ranch out of Texas, a 13,000 acre outfit running 400 cows and 40 head of horses. The personable Mitchell answered questions while watching other teams hard at work in the spacious outdoor arena of the Lincoln County Fairgrounds. “It’s cooler up here and we just like the weather,” he continued on the subject. “So we’ll come here and then we’re going to Colorado Springs next weekend (to compete in the Ride for the Brand Championship Rodeo). It’s a mini-vacation time.”

That mini-vacation for Crutch and his team included activities such as bronc riding, doctoring, branding, sorting, jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking. While bronc riding, sorting, doctoring and branding sound like reflections of a normal day on the ranch; the jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking competitions were a bit more hectic. Known as the “bull riding of ranch rodeo,” wild cow milking is pure spectacle for the fans and pure chaos for those involved. A rider ropes a large momma cow while three cowboys from his team chase her down and attempt to keep her in place as the rider dismounts and takes his rope off the horn of his saddle. Another team member then attempts to milk the cow into a beer bottle as everyone else holds on for dear life. Once enough milk is in the bottle to pour, the milker sprints to a judge and time is stopped. It’s a great example of the old saying, “If momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.”

Jackpot trailer loading was yet another exhibition in controlled mayhem. First, a yearling was roped from horseback and then manhandled into the back of a trailer. With the yearling secure, two horses from the team were also loaded into the back of the trailer and the door latched. Immediately following, a mad scramble ensued as every team member piled inside the cab of the truck to stop the timers. Taking home top honors in the fun-filled event was the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team, who also managed to nail down an arena record time of 59.81 seconds in the process.

“Well, we set an arena record while we won that,” said a smiling Randy Peterson of the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team. “We’ve been coming here for the last several years and I knew we could do that; we just made it come through this year.”

Based in Kansas, Peterson and his crew drive 450 miles to compete in the Hugo contest. When asked what keeps them coming back every year, the personable cowboy was quick with a reply.

“We’re just trying to qualify for the world championships (in Amarillo),” he stated while watching awards being handed out after the completion of the rodeo.

Just one team managed to grab that Amarillo qualification by earning the highest average score throughout the two-day competition. The Wachob Ranch/TC Outfit (from Nebraska and South Dakota) not only received an invite to the WRCA world championships in November, they also snared an impressive load of custom champion buckles, certificates for new Resistol hats and $3,500 in prize money. All in all, it was a good haul for a weekend of cowboy competition in the middle of Colorado ranching country.

“It’s overwhelming, for sure,” said a happy Kacy Wachob, owner of the Wachob Ranch based in the Sandhills of Nebraska, when asked his thoughts on winning the competition and qualifying for the Amarillo world championships. “We made it down a few years ago to Amarillo and we’ve been wanting to get back. It came right down to the wire today. There were a lot of good teams here and it just, everything just kind of fell together with the points and everything.”

With some of the ranch rodeos taking place in big indoor arenas, Wachob was asked his thoughts on the experience of competing outdoors in the expansive Lincoln County Fairgrounds arena, which saw plenty of sunshine mixed with some rain over the weekend.

“It makes it more realistic,” he described with certainty. “It kind of feels like an everyday deal. If you’re out there and you’ve got to work cows and it’s raining, you’ve just got to deal with it. If it’s hot, you’ve got to deal with it,” the ranch owner emphasized. “They do a really good job here of making everybody feel at home.”

Not only did Wachob enjoy the competition’s facilities, the winning rancher also had praise for his fellow competitors.

“Oh, it was great,” he added with another big smile. “This is, to us, one of the toughest rodeos. A lot of these teams here have been to the (Amarillo) finals and we hope to see them down there again. This is a good rodeo, a fun rodeo, and we’ve been coming here forever. I like it.”

With nine years now in the bag, event organizers like the direction in which the ranch rodeo is headed. Although nearly half the population of small town Hugo already attends on an annual basis, they’re still aiming higher.

“It’s just grown every year, so that’s good,” summed up Waite about the rodeo committee’s efforts. “Our crowds have grown. We’ve always had a ranch horse show, most years. One year we had a benefit roping for Thompsons when the Thompson Ranch family got hurt, and our trade show has gotten bigger every year. We’ve just progressively gotten better at it.”

With a hard working committee and a load of can-do attitudes in place, it looks like 2011 may turn out to be a perfect 10 for the Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo.

For more information, please visit ColoradoChampionshipRanchRodeo.com.

Cowboys from working ranches throughout the west galloped into the small town of Hugo, Colo., to put on a present display of our country’s cattleman past in the ninth annual Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo, held over the weekend of June 25-26. The event was part of the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA), an organization dedicated to preserving the lifestyle of authentic working ranch cowboys and keeping our ranching heritage alive and well.

The event in Hugo – which brought together 14 teams vying for cash prizes along with a coveted automatic qualification to the WRCA World Championships in Amarillo, Texas – was put together by a dedicated crew of volunteers from the local community who take pride in offering the cowboy competition on a yearly basis.

“We just do it for the cowboys,” said Tina Waite, secretary of the rodeo and a part of the event since its inception. Waite’s husband is foreman of the nearby Withers Ranch, so the ranching lifestyle is close to her heart. “This used to be big cowboy country and it’s kind of gotten where it’s not so much. We like having cowboys in Hugo,” she added with conviction. “It’s about representing cowboys and keeping the history (here).”

The cowboys liked competing in Hugo just as much, and weren’t shy about saying so.

“We like coming up here, we do,” stated Mark Mitchell, owner of Crutch Ranch out of Texas, a 13,000 acre outfit running 400 cows and 40 head of horses. The personable Mitchell answered questions while watching other teams hard at work in the spacious outdoor arena of the Lincoln County Fairgrounds. “It’s cooler up here and we just like the weather,” he continued on the subject. “So we’ll come here and then we’re going to Colorado Springs next weekend (to compete in the Ride for the Brand Championship Rodeo). It’s a mini-vacation time.”

That mini-vacation for Crutch and his team included activities such as bronc riding, doctoring, branding, sorting, jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking. While bronc riding, sorting, doctoring and branding sound like reflections of a normal day on the ranch; the jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking competitions were a bit more hectic. Known as the “bull riding of ranch rodeo,” wild cow milking is pure spectacle for the fans and pure chaos for those involved. A rider ropes a large momma cow while three cowboys from his team chase her down and attempt to keep her in place as the rider dismounts and takes his rope off the horn of his saddle. Another team member then attempts to milk the cow into a beer bottle as everyone else holds on for dear life. Once enough milk is in the bottle to pour, the milker sprints to a judge and time is stopped. It’s a great example of the old saying, “If momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.”

Jackpot trailer loading was yet another exhibition in controlled mayhem. First, a yearling was roped from horseback and then manhandled into the back of a trailer. With the yearling secure, two horses from the team were also loaded into the back of the trailer and the door latched. Immediately following, a mad scramble ensued as every team member piled inside the cab of the truck to stop the timers. Taking home top honors in the fun-filled event was the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team, who also managed to nail down an arena record time of 59.81 seconds in the process.

“Well, we set an arena record while we won that,” said a smiling Randy Peterson of the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team. “We’ve been coming here for the last several years and I knew we could do that; we just made it come through this year.”

Based in Kansas, Peterson and his crew drive 450 miles to compete in the Hugo contest. When asked what keeps them coming back every year, the personable cowboy was quick with a reply.

“We’re just trying to qualify for the world championships (in Amarillo),” he stated while watching awards being handed out after the completion of the rodeo.

Just one team managed to grab that Amarillo qualification by earning the highest average score throughout the two-day competition. The Wachob Ranch/TC Outfit (from Nebraska and South Dakota) not only received an invite to the WRCA world championships in November, they also snared an impressive load of custom champion buckles, certificates for new Resistol hats and $3,500 in prize money. All in all, it was a good haul for a weekend of cowboy competition in the middle of Colorado ranching country.

“It’s overwhelming, for sure,” said a happy Kacy Wachob, owner of the Wachob Ranch based in the Sandhills of Nebraska, when asked his thoughts on winning the competition and qualifying for the Amarillo world championships. “We made it down a few years ago to Amarillo and we’ve been wanting to get back. It came right down to the wire today. There were a lot of good teams here and it just, everything just kind of fell together with the points and everything.”

With some of the ranch rodeos taking place in big indoor arenas, Wachob was asked his thoughts on the experience of competing outdoors in the expansive Lincoln County Fairgrounds arena, which saw plenty of sunshine mixed with some rain over the weekend.

“It makes it more realistic,” he described with certainty. “It kind of feels like an everyday deal. If you’re out there and you’ve got to work cows and it’s raining, you’ve just got to deal with it. If it’s hot, you’ve got to deal with it,” the ranch owner emphasized. “They do a really good job here of making everybody feel at home.”

Not only did Wachob enjoy the competition’s facilities, the winning rancher also had praise for his fellow competitors.

“Oh, it was great,” he added with another big smile. “This is, to us, one of the toughest rodeos. A lot of these teams here have been to the (Amarillo) finals and we hope to see them down there again. This is a good rodeo, a fun rodeo, and we’ve been coming here forever. I like it.”

With nine years now in the bag, event organizers like the direction in which the ranch rodeo is headed. Although nearly half the population of small town Hugo already attends on an annual basis, they’re still aiming higher.

“It’s just grown every year, so that’s good,” summed up Waite about the rodeo committee’s efforts. “Our crowds have grown. We’ve always had a ranch horse show, most years. One year we had a benefit roping for Thompsons when the Thompson Ranch family got hurt, and our trade show has gotten bigger every year. We’ve just progressively gotten better at it.”

With a hard working committee and a load of can-do attitudes in place, it looks like 2011 may turn out to be a perfect 10 for the Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo.

For more information, please visit ColoradoChampionshipRanchRodeo.com.

Cowboys from working ranches throughout the west galloped into the small town of Hugo, Colo., to put on a present display of our country’s cattleman past in the ninth annual Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo, held over the weekend of June 25-26. The event was part of the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA), an organization dedicated to preserving the lifestyle of authentic working ranch cowboys and keeping our ranching heritage alive and well.

The event in Hugo – which brought together 14 teams vying for cash prizes along with a coveted automatic qualification to the WRCA World Championships in Amarillo, Texas – was put together by a dedicated crew of volunteers from the local community who take pride in offering the cowboy competition on a yearly basis.

“We just do it for the cowboys,” said Tina Waite, secretary of the rodeo and a part of the event since its inception. Waite’s husband is foreman of the nearby Withers Ranch, so the ranching lifestyle is close to her heart. “This used to be big cowboy country and it’s kind of gotten where it’s not so much. We like having cowboys in Hugo,” she added with conviction. “It’s about representing cowboys and keeping the history (here).”

The cowboys liked competing in Hugo just as much, and weren’t shy about saying so.

“We like coming up here, we do,” stated Mark Mitchell, owner of Crutch Ranch out of Texas, a 13,000 acre outfit running 400 cows and 40 head of horses. The personable Mitchell answered questions while watching other teams hard at work in the spacious outdoor arena of the Lincoln County Fairgrounds. “It’s cooler up here and we just like the weather,” he continued on the subject. “So we’ll come here and then we’re going to Colorado Springs next weekend (to compete in the Ride for the Brand Championship Rodeo). It’s a mini-vacation time.”

That mini-vacation for Crutch and his team included activities such as bronc riding, doctoring, branding, sorting, jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking. While bronc riding, sorting, doctoring and branding sound like reflections of a normal day on the ranch; the jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking competitions were a bit more hectic. Known as the “bull riding of ranch rodeo,” wild cow milking is pure spectacle for the fans and pure chaos for those involved. A rider ropes a large momma cow while three cowboys from his team chase her down and attempt to keep her in place as the rider dismounts and takes his rope off the horn of his saddle. Another team member then attempts to milk the cow into a beer bottle as everyone else holds on for dear life. Once enough milk is in the bottle to pour, the milker sprints to a judge and time is stopped. It’s a great example of the old saying, “If momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.”

Jackpot trailer loading was yet another exhibition in controlled mayhem. First, a yearling was roped from horseback and then manhandled into the back of a trailer. With the yearling secure, two horses from the team were also loaded into the back of the trailer and the door latched. Immediately following, a mad scramble ensued as every team member piled inside the cab of the truck to stop the timers. Taking home top honors in the fun-filled event was the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team, who also managed to nail down an arena record time of 59.81 seconds in the process.

“Well, we set an arena record while we won that,” said a smiling Randy Peterson of the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team. “We’ve been coming here for the last several years and I knew we could do that; we just made it come through this year.”

Based in Kansas, Peterson and his crew drive 450 miles to compete in the Hugo contest. When asked what keeps them coming back every year, the personable cowboy was quick with a reply.

“We’re just trying to qualify for the world championships (in Amarillo),” he stated while watching awards being handed out after the completion of the rodeo.

Just one team managed to grab that Amarillo qualification by earning the highest average score throughout the two-day competition. The Wachob Ranch/TC Outfit (from Nebraska and South Dakota) not only received an invite to the WRCA world championships in November, they also snared an impressive load of custom champion buckles, certificates for new Resistol hats and $3,500 in prize money. All in all, it was a good haul for a weekend of cowboy competition in the middle of Colorado ranching country.

“It’s overwhelming, for sure,” said a happy Kacy Wachob, owner of the Wachob Ranch based in the Sandhills of Nebraska, when asked his thoughts on winning the competition and qualifying for the Amarillo world championships. “We made it down a few years ago to Amarillo and we’ve been wanting to get back. It came right down to the wire today. There were a lot of good teams here and it just, everything just kind of fell together with the points and everything.”

With some of the ranch rodeos taking place in big indoor arenas, Wachob was asked his thoughts on the experience of competing outdoors in the expansive Lincoln County Fairgrounds arena, which saw plenty of sunshine mixed with some rain over the weekend.

“It makes it more realistic,” he described with certainty. “It kind of feels like an everyday deal. If you’re out there and you’ve got to work cows and it’s raining, you’ve just got to deal with it. If it’s hot, you’ve got to deal with it,” the ranch owner emphasized. “They do a really good job here of making everybody feel at home.”

Not only did Wachob enjoy the competition’s facilities, the winning rancher also had praise for his fellow competitors.

“Oh, it was great,” he added with another big smile. “This is, to us, one of the toughest rodeos. A lot of these teams here have been to the (Amarillo) finals and we hope to see them down there again. This is a good rodeo, a fun rodeo, and we’ve been coming here forever. I like it.”

With nine years now in the bag, event organizers like the direction in which the ranch rodeo is headed. Although nearly half the population of small town Hugo already attends on an annual basis, they’re still aiming higher.

“It’s just grown every year, so that’s good,” summed up Waite about the rodeo committee’s efforts. “Our crowds have grown. We’ve always had a ranch horse show, most years. One year we had a benefit roping for Thompsons when the Thompson Ranch family got hurt, and our trade show has gotten bigger every year. We’ve just progressively gotten better at it.”

With a hard working committee and a load of can-do attitudes in place, it looks like 2011 may turn out to be a perfect 10 for the Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo.

For more information, please visit ColoradoChampionshipRanchRodeo.com.

Cowboys from working ranches throughout the west galloped into the small town of Hugo, Colo., to put on a present display of our country’s cattleman past in the ninth annual Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo, held over the weekend of June 25-26. The event was part of the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA), an organization dedicated to preserving the lifestyle of authentic working ranch cowboys and keeping our ranching heritage alive and well.

The event in Hugo – which brought together 14 teams vying for cash prizes along with a coveted automatic qualification to the WRCA World Championships in Amarillo, Texas – was put together by a dedicated crew of volunteers from the local community who take pride in offering the cowboy competition on a yearly basis.

“We just do it for the cowboys,” said Tina Waite, secretary of the rodeo and a part of the event since its inception. Waite’s husband is foreman of the nearby Withers Ranch, so the ranching lifestyle is close to her heart. “This used to be big cowboy country and it’s kind of gotten where it’s not so much. We like having cowboys in Hugo,” she added with conviction. “It’s about representing cowboys and keeping the history (here).”

The cowboys liked competing in Hugo just as much, and weren’t shy about saying so.

“We like coming up here, we do,” stated Mark Mitchell, owner of Crutch Ranch out of Texas, a 13,000 acre outfit running 400 cows and 40 head of horses. The personable Mitchell answered questions while watching other teams hard at work in the spacious outdoor arena of the Lincoln County Fairgrounds. “It’s cooler up here and we just like the weather,” he continued on the subject. “So we’ll come here and then we’re going to Colorado Springs next weekend (to compete in the Ride for the Brand Championship Rodeo). It’s a mini-vacation time.”

That mini-vacation for Crutch and his team included activities such as bronc riding, doctoring, branding, sorting, jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking. While bronc riding, sorting, doctoring and branding sound like reflections of a normal day on the ranch; the jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking competitions were a bit more hectic. Known as the “bull riding of ranch rodeo,” wild cow milking is pure spectacle for the fans and pure chaos for those involved. A rider ropes a large momma cow while three cowboys from his team chase her down and attempt to keep her in place as the rider dismounts and takes his rope off the horn of his saddle. Another team member then attempts to milk the cow into a beer bottle as everyone else holds on for dear life. Once enough milk is in the bottle to pour, the milker sprints to a judge and time is stopped. It’s a great example of the old saying, “If momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.”

Jackpot trailer loading was yet another exhibition in controlled mayhem. First, a yearling was roped from horseback and then manhandled into the back of a trailer. With the yearling secure, two horses from the team were also loaded into the back of the trailer and the door latched. Immediately following, a mad scramble ensued as every team member piled inside the cab of the truck to stop the timers. Taking home top honors in the fun-filled event was the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team, who also managed to nail down an arena record time of 59.81 seconds in the process.

“Well, we set an arena record while we won that,” said a smiling Randy Peterson of the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team. “We’ve been coming here for the last several years and I knew we could do that; we just made it come through this year.”

Based in Kansas, Peterson and his crew drive 450 miles to compete in the Hugo contest. When asked what keeps them coming back every year, the personable cowboy was quick with a reply.

“We’re just trying to qualify for the world championships (in Amarillo),” he stated while watching awards being handed out after the completion of the rodeo.

Just one team managed to grab that Amarillo qualification by earning the highest average score throughout the two-day competition. The Wachob Ranch/TC Outfit (from Nebraska and South Dakota) not only received an invite to the WRCA world championships in November, they also snared an impressive load of custom champion buckles, certificates for new Resistol hats and $3,500 in prize money. All in all, it was a good haul for a weekend of cowboy competition in the middle of Colorado ranching country.

“It’s overwhelming, for sure,” said a happy Kacy Wachob, owner of the Wachob Ranch based in the Sandhills of Nebraska, when asked his thoughts on winning the competition and qualifying for the Amarillo world championships. “We made it down a few years ago to Amarillo and we’ve been wanting to get back. It came right down to the wire today. There were a lot of good teams here and it just, everything just kind of fell together with the points and everything.”

With some of the ranch rodeos taking place in big indoor arenas, Wachob was asked his thoughts on the experience of competing outdoors in the expansive Lincoln County Fairgrounds arena, which saw plenty of sunshine mixed with some rain over the weekend.

“It makes it more realistic,” he described with certainty. “It kind of feels like an everyday deal. If you’re out there and you’ve got to work cows and it’s raining, you’ve just got to deal with it. If it’s hot, you’ve got to deal with it,” the ranch owner emphasized. “They do a really good job here of making everybody feel at home.”

Not only did Wachob enjoy the competition’s facilities, the winning rancher also had praise for his fellow competitors.

“Oh, it was great,” he added with another big smile. “This is, to us, one of the toughest rodeos. A lot of these teams here have been to the (Amarillo) finals and we hope to see them down there again. This is a good rodeo, a fun rodeo, and we’ve been coming here forever. I like it.”

With nine years now in the bag, event organizers like the direction in which the ranch rodeo is headed. Although nearly half the population of small town Hugo already attends on an annual basis, they’re still aiming higher.

“It’s just grown every year, so that’s good,” summed up Waite about the rodeo committee’s efforts. “Our crowds have grown. We’ve always had a ranch horse show, most years. One year we had a benefit roping for Thompsons when the Thompson Ranch family got hurt, and our trade show has gotten bigger every year. We’ve just progressively gotten better at it.”

With a hard working committee and a load of can-do attitudes in place, it looks like 2011 may turn out to be a perfect 10 for the Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo.

For more information, please visit ColoradoChampionshipRanchRodeo.com.

Cowboys from working ranches throughout the west galloped into the small town of Hugo, Colo., to put on a present display of our country’s cattleman past in the ninth annual Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo, held over the weekend of June 25-26. The event was part of the Working Ranch Cowboys Association (WRCA), an organization dedicated to preserving the lifestyle of authentic working ranch cowboys and keeping our ranching heritage alive and well.

The event in Hugo – which brought together 14 teams vying for cash prizes along with a coveted automatic qualification to the WRCA World Championships in Amarillo, Texas – was put together by a dedicated crew of volunteers from the local community who take pride in offering the cowboy competition on a yearly basis.

“We just do it for the cowboys,” said Tina Waite, secretary of the rodeo and a part of the event since its inception. Waite’s husband is foreman of the nearby Withers Ranch, so the ranching lifestyle is close to her heart. “This used to be big cowboy country and it’s kind of gotten where it’s not so much. We like having cowboys in Hugo,” she added with conviction. “It’s about representing cowboys and keeping the history (here).”

The cowboys liked competing in Hugo just as much, and weren’t shy about saying so.

“We like coming up here, we do,” stated Mark Mitchell, owner of Crutch Ranch out of Texas, a 13,000 acre outfit running 400 cows and 40 head of horses. The personable Mitchell answered questions while watching other teams hard at work in the spacious outdoor arena of the Lincoln County Fairgrounds. “It’s cooler up here and we just like the weather,” he continued on the subject. “So we’ll come here and then we’re going to Colorado Springs next weekend (to compete in the Ride for the Brand Championship Rodeo). It’s a mini-vacation time.”

That mini-vacation for Crutch and his team included activities such as bronc riding, doctoring, branding, sorting, jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking. While bronc riding, sorting, doctoring and branding sound like reflections of a normal day on the ranch; the jackpot trailer loading and wild cow milking competitions were a bit more hectic. Known as the “bull riding of ranch rodeo,” wild cow milking is pure spectacle for the fans and pure chaos for those involved. A rider ropes a large momma cow while three cowboys from his team chase her down and attempt to keep her in place as the rider dismounts and takes his rope off the horn of his saddle. Another team member then attempts to milk the cow into a beer bottle as everyone else holds on for dear life. Once enough milk is in the bottle to pour, the milker sprints to a judge and time is stopped. It’s a great example of the old saying, “If momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.”

Jackpot trailer loading was yet another exhibition in controlled mayhem. First, a yearling was roped from horseback and then manhandled into the back of a trailer. With the yearling secure, two horses from the team were also loaded into the back of the trailer and the door latched. Immediately following, a mad scramble ensued as every team member piled inside the cab of the truck to stop the timers. Taking home top honors in the fun-filled event was the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team, who also managed to nail down an arena record time of 59.81 seconds in the process.

“Well, we set an arena record while we won that,” said a smiling Randy Peterson of the Buck Creek/Lonesome Pine Ranches team. “We’ve been coming here for the last several years and I knew we could do that; we just made it come through this year.”

Based in Kansas, Peterson and his crew drive 450 miles to compete in the Hugo contest. When asked what keeps them coming back every year, the personable cowboy was quick with a reply.

“We’re just trying to qualify for the world championships (in Amarillo),” he stated while watching awards being handed out after the completion of the rodeo.

Just one team managed to grab that Amarillo qualification by earning the highest average score throughout the two-day competition. The Wachob Ranch/TC Outfit (from Nebraska and South Dakota) not only received an invite to the WRCA world championships in November, they also snared an impressive load of custom champion buckles, certificates for new Resistol hats and $3,500 in prize money. All in all, it was a good haul for a weekend of cowboy competition in the middle of Colorado ranching country.

“It’s overwhelming, for sure,” said a happy Kacy Wachob, owner of the Wachob Ranch based in the Sandhills of Nebraska, when asked his thoughts on winning the competition and qualifying for the Amarillo world championships. “We made it down a few years ago to Amarillo and we’ve been wanting to get back. It came right down to the wire today. There were a lot of good teams here and it just, everything just kind of fell together with the points and everything.”

With some of the ranch rodeos taking place in big indoor arenas, Wachob was asked his thoughts on the experience of competing outdoors in the expansive Lincoln County Fairgrounds arena, which saw plenty of sunshine mixed with some rain over the weekend.

“It makes it more realistic,” he described with certainty. “It kind of feels like an everyday deal. If you’re out there and you’ve got to work cows and it’s raining, you’ve just got to deal with it. If it’s hot, you’ve got to deal with it,” the ranch owner emphasized. “They do a really good job here of making everybody feel at home.”

Not only did Wachob enjoy the competition’s facilities, the winning rancher also had praise for his fellow competitors.

“Oh, it was great,” he added with another big smile. “This is, to us, one of the toughest rodeos. A lot of these teams here have been to the (Amarillo) finals and we hope to see them down there again. This is a good rodeo, a fun rodeo, and we’ve been coming here forever. I like it.”

With nine years now in the bag, event organizers like the direction in which the ranch rodeo is headed. Although nearly half the population of small town Hugo already attends on an annual basis, they’re still aiming higher.

“It’s just grown every year, so that’s good,” summed up Waite about the rodeo committee’s efforts. “Our crowds have grown. We’ve always had a ranch horse show, most years. One year we had a benefit roping for Thompsons when the Thompson Ranch family got hurt, and our trade show has gotten bigger every year. We’ve just progressively gotten better at it.”

With a hard working committee and a load of can-do attitudes in place, it looks like 2011 may turn out to be a perfect 10 for the Colorado Championship Ranch Rodeo.

For more information, please visit ColoradoChampionshipRanchRodeo.com.