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Colorado Farm Show has something to offer everyone

Gayle Smith
Gering, Neb.

As Gilliam and Owen Steffen, and Will Schneider of Wiggins, Colo., checked out a skid loader at the John Deere display, their family reminisced about how much smaller the tractors were 40-50 years ago. “I never dreamed we would ever see tractors this big,” one said, pointing to a John Deere tractor nearby. “This is what we like about coming to the Colorado Farm Show,” she continued, “we can check out the latest technology. You don’t get many opportunities to see something like this close-up.”

Spectators at the 47th Annual Colorado Farm Show had the opportunity to see everything from the newest technology in tractors and farm equipment, to feed additives and livestock supplies by visiting the hundreds of vendors at the show. Show attendees could also pick up information on everything from banking and insurance, to health and recipes. The focus of the show is to provide the opportunity for visitors to obtain information on a variety of agricultural products at one place, and generate new ideas they may be able to incorporate into their own operations.

For most vendors, the Colorado Farm Show is an opportunity to get their product or service in front of a multitude of people. Keith DeVoe of Roggen Elevator was talking with customers and handing out popcorn during the three-day event. Roggen Elevator has been a vendor at the show for nine years. “It is great public relations for us,” DeVoe said. “It is a great time of year for us. This show gives us the opportunity to visit with our customers and show others what we have to offer.”

In addition, many FFA chapters brought their youth to experience the variety of occupations available in agriculture. Lacy Mauch and Catherine Harmon of the Highland FFA Chapter in Colorado found the whole experience quite educational. “We have had the opportunity to see a lot of interesting things here,” said Harmon. “We went to hear Temple Grandin’s presentation this morning. It was so interesting and educational.” Mauch added, “I really liked looking at all the displays here.”

Edna Addison was representing Guaranty Bank and Trust Company, which is based in Denver, Colo., but has 34 branches across the state. “The quality of life is great here,” she said. “We come to this show to visit with our customers and show our appreciation for their business. This is what we are all about,” she said.

Steve Frank of Rocky Mountain Water Environment Association said his company has had a presence at the show for 10 years. The company works with farmers who use bio-solids. “We come to the show to get more exposure in the Colorado market, and to develop leads and contacts,” Frank said.

For Kristy Teague of Stewart and Stevenson, the show leads to equipment sales for her company. “Because it is such a big show, we get many leads and some people come to buy parts from the Denver branch,” she explained.

The public also had the opportunity to learn something new during several presentations that were held during the three-day event. On Tuesday, the focus was on equine, beef, and an agriculture spotlight. Equine speakers talked about treatments for performance horses who have been injured, and the benefits of horse chiropractic. A highlight during Beef Day was a standing room only presentation by Temple Grandin discussing current issues related to animal handling and care. Other beef speakers discussed the importance of feed efficiency in beef cattle, and consumers trends. During the ag spotlight, speakers talked about commodities, taxes, and conservation easements.

On Wednesday, the focus was on ag business during the Partners in Ag presentations. It was also Dairy Day, with presentations on the dairy check-off, agriculture activists, and global milk marketing. On Thursday, the focus was on hay and forage. Participants learned how to maximize their forage system, analyze the quality of their silage, and learn about biotechnology in crops. Partners in Ag and Spanish Education presentations were also presented.

The Colorado Farm Show is held each year at Island Grove Park in Greeley, Colo. The annual event showcases agriculture and the importance of agriculture in the United States. Most of the event is held indoors, with a few larger exhibits outside. The event draws 30,000 to 35,000 people each year. Most are from Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Kansas, although people travel from all over the country to attend the show.

As Gilliam and Owen Steffen, and Will Schneider of Wiggins, Colo., checked out a skid loader at the John Deere display, their family reminisced about how much smaller the tractors were 40-50 years ago. “I never dreamed we would ever see tractors this big,” one said, pointing to a John Deere tractor nearby. “This is what we like about coming to the Colorado Farm Show,” she continued, “we can check out the latest technology. You don’t get many opportunities to see something like this close-up.”

Spectators at the 47th Annual Colorado Farm Show had the opportunity to see everything from the newest technology in tractors and farm equipment, to feed additives and livestock supplies by visiting the hundreds of vendors at the show. Show attendees could also pick up information on everything from banking and insurance, to health and recipes. The focus of the show is to provide the opportunity for visitors to obtain information on a variety of agricultural products at one place, and generate new ideas they may be able to incorporate into their own operations.

For most vendors, the Colorado Farm Show is an opportunity to get their product or service in front of a multitude of people. Keith DeVoe of Roggen Elevator was talking with customers and handing out popcorn during the three-day event. Roggen Elevator has been a vendor at the show for nine years. “It is great public relations for us,” DeVoe said. “It is a great time of year for us. This show gives us the opportunity to visit with our customers and show others what we have to offer.”

In addition, many FFA chapters brought their youth to experience the variety of occupations available in agriculture. Lacy Mauch and Catherine Harmon of the Highland FFA Chapter in Colorado found the whole experience quite educational. “We have had the opportunity to see a lot of interesting things here,” said Harmon. “We went to hear Temple Grandin’s presentation this morning. It was so interesting and educational.” Mauch added, “I really liked looking at all the displays here.”

Edna Addison was representing Guaranty Bank and Trust Company, which is based in Denver, Colo., but has 34 branches across the state. “The quality of life is great here,” she said. “We come to this show to visit with our customers and show our appreciation for their business. This is what we are all about,” she said.

Steve Frank of Rocky Mountain Water Environment Association said his company has had a presence at the show for 10 years. The company works with farmers who use bio-solids. “We come to the show to get more exposure in the Colorado market, and to develop leads and contacts,” Frank said.

For Kristy Teague of Stewart and Stevenson, the show leads to equipment sales for her company. “Because it is such a big show, we get many leads and some people come to buy parts from the Denver branch,” she explained.

The public also had the opportunity to learn something new during several presentations that were held during the three-day event. On Tuesday, the focus was on equine, beef, and an agriculture spotlight. Equine speakers talked about treatments for performance horses who have been injured, and the benefits of horse chiropractic. A highlight during Beef Day was a standing room only presentation by Temple Grandin discussing current issues related to animal handling and care. Other beef speakers discussed the importance of feed efficiency in beef cattle, and consumers trends. During the ag spotlight, speakers talked about commodities, taxes, and conservation easements.

On Wednesday, the focus was on ag business during the Partners in Ag presentations. It was also Dairy Day, with presentations on the dairy check-off, agriculture activists, and global milk marketing. On Thursday, the focus was on hay and forage. Participants learned how to maximize their forage system, analyze the quality of their silage, and learn about biotechnology in crops. Partners in Ag and Spanish Education presentations were also presented.

The Colorado Farm Show is held each year at Island Grove Park in Greeley, Colo. The annual event showcases agriculture and the importance of agriculture in the United States. Most of the event is held indoors, with a few larger exhibits outside. The event draws 30,000 to 35,000 people each year. Most are from Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Kansas, although people travel from all over the country to attend the show.

As Gilliam and Owen Steffen, and Will Schneider of Wiggins, Colo., checked out a skid loader at the John Deere display, their family reminisced about how much smaller the tractors were 40-50 years ago. “I never dreamed we would ever see tractors this big,” one said, pointing to a John Deere tractor nearby. “This is what we like about coming to the Colorado Farm Show,” she continued, “we can check out the latest technology. You don’t get many opportunities to see something like this close-up.”

Spectators at the 47th Annual Colorado Farm Show had the opportunity to see everything from the newest technology in tractors and farm equipment, to feed additives and livestock supplies by visiting the hundreds of vendors at the show. Show attendees could also pick up information on everything from banking and insurance, to health and recipes. The focus of the show is to provide the opportunity for visitors to obtain information on a variety of agricultural products at one place, and generate new ideas they may be able to incorporate into their own operations.

For most vendors, the Colorado Farm Show is an opportunity to get their product or service in front of a multitude of people. Keith DeVoe of Roggen Elevator was talking with customers and handing out popcorn during the three-day event. Roggen Elevator has been a vendor at the show for nine years. “It is great public relations for us,” DeVoe said. “It is a great time of year for us. This show gives us the opportunity to visit with our customers and show others what we have to offer.”

In addition, many FFA chapters brought their youth to experience the variety of occupations available in agriculture. Lacy Mauch and Catherine Harmon of the Highland FFA Chapter in Colorado found the whole experience quite educational. “We have had the opportunity to see a lot of interesting things here,” said Harmon. “We went to hear Temple Grandin’s presentation this morning. It was so interesting and educational.” Mauch added, “I really liked looking at all the displays here.”

Edna Addison was representing Guaranty Bank and Trust Company, which is based in Denver, Colo., but has 34 branches across the state. “The quality of life is great here,” she said. “We come to this show to visit with our customers and show our appreciation for their business. This is what we are all about,” she said.

Steve Frank of Rocky Mountain Water Environment Association said his company has had a presence at the show for 10 years. The company works with farmers who use bio-solids. “We come to the show to get more exposure in the Colorado market, and to develop leads and contacts,” Frank said.

For Kristy Teague of Stewart and Stevenson, the show leads to equipment sales for her company. “Because it is such a big show, we get many leads and some people come to buy parts from the Denver branch,” she explained.

The public also had the opportunity to learn something new during several presentations that were held during the three-day event. On Tuesday, the focus was on equine, beef, and an agriculture spotlight. Equine speakers talked about treatments for performance horses who have been injured, and the benefits of horse chiropractic. A highlight during Beef Day was a standing room only presentation by Temple Grandin discussing current issues related to animal handling and care. Other beef speakers discussed the importance of feed efficiency in beef cattle, and consumers trends. During the ag spotlight, speakers talked about commodities, taxes, and conservation easements.

On Wednesday, the focus was on ag business during the Partners in Ag presentations. It was also Dairy Day, with presentations on the dairy check-off, agriculture activists, and global milk marketing. On Thursday, the focus was on hay and forage. Participants learned how to maximize their forage system, analyze the quality of their silage, and learn about biotechnology in crops. Partners in Ag and Spanish Education presentations were also presented.

The Colorado Farm Show is held each year at Island Grove Park in Greeley, Colo. The annual event showcases agriculture and the importance of agriculture in the United States. Most of the event is held indoors, with a few larger exhibits outside. The event draws 30,000 to 35,000 people each year. Most are from Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Kansas, although people travel from all over the country to attend the show.


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