Colorado Farm Show offers something for everyone | TheFencePost.com

Colorado Farm Show offers something for everyone

Gayle Smith
Gering, Neb.

Gayle SmithCourtney Paxton of Sterling, Colo., checks out a dairy cow cake at the Schmidt's Bakery display. Helen Wells answered questions about the unique cake.

Through the hustle and bustle of traffic roaming the buildings of the Colorado Farm Show, most everyone stopped by the adult version of a cakewalk. Once there, visitors had the opportunity to walk the length of the display looking at some very unique cakes, such as a genuine dairy cow cake and a John Deere cake. Even more importantly, they were able to sample a taste of what one Loveland, Colo., bakery has to offer.

Helen Wells and her staff with Schmidt’s Bakery and Delicatessen, brought some sweet treats with her to the Colorado Farm Show. Although the bakery is known for making wedding cakes of distinction, several happy taste testers were back for seconds to sample the tasty cake samples she offered.

This year’s Colorado Farm Show truly had something to offer everyone. Although many of the displays were more traditional, there were also many unique displays this year. One display, particularly interesting to the little folks, was a miniature version of a farm complete with house, building, farm equipment and fields. Children stopped and studied the display, wishing they could climb in and be the farmer for a day.

Folks came from all the surrounding states to visit the annual three-day show held in Greeley at Island Grove Park. In addition to tractors, equipment, feed and seed, show attendees could also pick up information on everything from banking and insurance, to health and recipes. The focus of the show is to provide the opportunity for visitors to obtain information on a variety of agricultural products at one place, and generate new ideas they may be able to incorporate into their own operations.

Farmers and ranchers also had an added bonus of attending many seminars designed to help them better evaluate their own operations. During Beef Day at the Colorado Farm Show, speakers from Colorado State University and the University of Nebraska talked to ranchers about determining whether or not to raise or purchase replacement heifers. The speakers pointed out that the main driver affecting whether to raise or purchase replacement heifers is calf cost at 600 pounds. Ranchers also need to look at their own operation and evaluate the costs involved in raising heifers. The researchers provided ranchers with a spreadsheet they could take home and use to input data from their own ranches to determine which is more economically feasible.

The group also discussed cheaper ways of producing replacement heifers. They told the crowd that feeding the developing heifer at a lower plane of nutrition on corn residue or grazing her and adding a protein supplement, then increasing her feed prior to breeding will result in earlier conception rates. Heifers that calve within the first 21-days of the calving period can produce more pounds of beef over their lifespan.

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Horse owners also had the opportunity to attend two seminars during the Equine Day portion of the show. During the morning session, nutritionists and consultants visited with the crowd about how to provide the horse with a proper ration depending upon what its job is.

During the afternoon session, Steve Foxworth, who is a certified natural balance farrier, gave a live demonstration on how he maps a hoof of a horse to properly fit a shoe. During the demonstration, he was also able to point out problem areas of the hoof and how properly mounting the shoe using hoof mapping can alleviate pain in the hoof and leg making the horse perform better.

During the three-day show, presentations were also given in agribusiness issues, tree windbreaks, dog obedience, solar and wind facilities, dairy issues, hay and forage issues and fun and humor.

Through the hustle and bustle of traffic roaming the buildings of the Colorado Farm Show, most everyone stopped by the adult version of a cakewalk. Once there, visitors had the opportunity to walk the length of the display looking at some very unique cakes, such as a genuine dairy cow cake and a John Deere cake. Even more importantly, they were able to sample a taste of what one Loveland, Colo., bakery has to offer.

Helen Wells and her staff with Schmidt’s Bakery and Delicatessen, brought some sweet treats with her to the Colorado Farm Show. Although the bakery is known for making wedding cakes of distinction, several happy taste testers were back for seconds to sample the tasty cake samples she offered.

This year’s Colorado Farm Show truly had something to offer everyone. Although many of the displays were more traditional, there were also many unique displays this year. One display, particularly interesting to the little folks, was a miniature version of a farm complete with house, building, farm equipment and fields. Children stopped and studied the display, wishing they could climb in and be the farmer for a day.

Folks came from all the surrounding states to visit the annual three-day show held in Greeley at Island Grove Park. In addition to tractors, equipment, feed and seed, show attendees could also pick up information on everything from banking and insurance, to health and recipes. The focus of the show is to provide the opportunity for visitors to obtain information on a variety of agricultural products at one place, and generate new ideas they may be able to incorporate into their own operations.

Farmers and ranchers also had an added bonus of attending many seminars designed to help them better evaluate their own operations. During Beef Day at the Colorado Farm Show, speakers from Colorado State University and the University of Nebraska talked to ranchers about determining whether or not to raise or purchase replacement heifers. The speakers pointed out that the main driver affecting whether to raise or purchase replacement heifers is calf cost at 600 pounds. Ranchers also need to look at their own operation and evaluate the costs involved in raising heifers. The researchers provided ranchers with a spreadsheet they could take home and use to input data from their own ranches to determine which is more economically feasible.

The group also discussed cheaper ways of producing replacement heifers. They told the crowd that feeding the developing heifer at a lower plane of nutrition on corn residue or grazing her and adding a protein supplement, then increasing her feed prior to breeding will result in earlier conception rates. Heifers that calve within the first 21-days of the calving period can produce more pounds of beef over their lifespan.

Horse owners also had the opportunity to attend two seminars during the Equine Day portion of the show. During the morning session, nutritionists and consultants visited with the crowd about how to provide the horse with a proper ration depending upon what its job is.

During the afternoon session, Steve Foxworth, who is a certified natural balance farrier, gave a live demonstration on how he maps a hoof of a horse to properly fit a shoe. During the demonstration, he was also able to point out problem areas of the hoof and how properly mounting the shoe using hoof mapping can alleviate pain in the hoof and leg making the horse perform better.

During the three-day show, presentations were also given in agribusiness issues, tree windbreaks, dog obedience, solar and wind facilities, dairy issues, hay and forage issues and fun and humor.