Cowboy Christmas Gift Show offered up a unique blend of items | TheFencePost.com

Cowboy Christmas Gift Show offered up a unique blend of items

Gayle Smith
Potter, Neb.

The Blue Hill FFA students built pumpkins and other creative items from horseshoes they recycled from area feedlots. They sell the items they make to raise money for

Stepping through the doors of the D&N Event Center the first Saturday in November is like stepping into a cowboy’s shopping mall. Everything from western crafts and frames to clothing, jewelry, and home furnishings to tack and horse trailers awaits the eager shoppers.

Shelli Arensdorf took over the show several years ago from a friend in Hershey, Neb., who held it at the Steerhead Arena. “When they moved, I took over the show and moved it to North Platte,” she explained. “This is now the seventh year it has been held at the D&N Events Center.”

Since then, Shelli has worked hard to build the show up to what it is today. “When I took over, we had about 25-30 vendors that first year,” she explained. “This year’s show had 69 vendors from Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming and Kansas.”

Cindy Brader of Blue River Art travels to the show to sell her floral arrangements made from sample boots, and other country items she makes throughout the year. “I first started coming to this show when my daughter was in high school rodeo,” she explained. “I like the people and the theme of the show, so I have continued to come each year.”

Shelli said she became interested in holding the show because she needed someplace to sell her frames and furniture she has made from barnwood. “At a regular craft show, I might sell a frame, but at a show like this more of the people who are interested in western items come.”

Shelli schedules the annual show in conjunction with the Nebraska High School Rodeo Mid-Winter banquet. “Everyone with a rodeo background is usually in town that weekend, she explained. “I have tried to design this show similar to the Cowboy Christmas show they hold during the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas.”

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The show draws shoppers looking for something unique. Looking at a barbwire cross at one of the displays, Tabitha said, “I come to the show just to see all the new items people have created. It is a one-of-a-kind show.”

Roy Rogers of North Platte, Neb., was checking out the horseshoe benches at the Cowgirl Arts display. “I purchased a table from her last year,” he explained of the artist. “She told me she had some new items, so I had to come check them out.”

Lisa Russell of Merna, Neb., comes to the show to help her sister at her Go West booth, which sells purses, jewelry and tack. “Everything is different at this show,” she said. “You can come here and see so many unique items you can’t find anywhere else. There is a lot of variety here.”

Variety is Shelli’s goal for the show. “I like vendors with items that appeal to everyone, whether they live in the country or the city. This year, over 2,500 people came to the show.”

Laurie Olson-Zorn of Oz Alpacas said she brings her wares to the show because of the variety. “It gives me an opportunity to show people what I have and what Alpacas can produce. It is a way to expose people to Alpaca fiber and how soft it is. It is also a great way to get my name out there.”

Stepping through the doors of the D&N Event Center the first Saturday in November is like stepping into a cowboy’s shopping mall. Everything from western crafts and frames to clothing, jewelry, and home furnishings to tack and horse trailers awaits the eager shoppers.

Shelli Arensdorf took over the show several years ago from a friend in Hershey, Neb., who held it at the Steerhead Arena. “When they moved, I took over the show and moved it to North Platte,” she explained. “This is now the seventh year it has been held at the D&N Events Center.”

Since then, Shelli has worked hard to build the show up to what it is today. “When I took over, we had about 25-30 vendors that first year,” she explained. “This year’s show had 69 vendors from Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming and Kansas.”

Cindy Brader of Blue River Art travels to the show to sell her floral arrangements made from sample boots, and other country items she makes throughout the year. “I first started coming to this show when my daughter was in high school rodeo,” she explained. “I like the people and the theme of the show, so I have continued to come each year.”

Shelli said she became interested in holding the show because she needed someplace to sell her frames and furniture she has made from barnwood. “At a regular craft show, I might sell a frame, but at a show like this more of the people who are interested in western items come.”

Shelli schedules the annual show in conjunction with the Nebraska High School Rodeo Mid-Winter banquet. “Everyone with a rodeo background is usually in town that weekend, she explained. “I have tried to design this show similar to the Cowboy Christmas show they hold during the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas.”

The show draws shoppers looking for something unique. Looking at a barbwire cross at one of the displays, Tabitha said, “I come to the show just to see all the new items people have created. It is a one-of-a-kind show.”

Roy Rogers of North Platte, Neb., was checking out the horseshoe benches at the Cowgirl Arts display. “I purchased a table from her last year,” he explained of the artist. “She told me she had some new items, so I had to come check them out.”

Lisa Russell of Merna, Neb., comes to the show to help her sister at her Go West booth, which sells purses, jewelry and tack. “Everything is different at this show,” she said. “You can come here and see so many unique items you can’t find anywhere else. There is a lot of variety here.”

Variety is Shelli’s goal for the show. “I like vendors with items that appeal to everyone, whether they live in the country or the city. This year, over 2,500 people came to the show.”

Laurie Olson-Zorn of Oz Alpacas said she brings her wares to the show because of the variety. “It gives me an opportunity to show people what I have and what Alpacas can produce. It is a way to expose people to Alpaca fiber and how soft it is. It is also a great way to get my name out there.”

Stepping through the doors of the D&N Event Center the first Saturday in November is like stepping into a cowboy’s shopping mall. Everything from western crafts and frames to clothing, jewelry, and home furnishings to tack and horse trailers awaits the eager shoppers.

Shelli Arensdorf took over the show several years ago from a friend in Hershey, Neb., who held it at the Steerhead Arena. “When they moved, I took over the show and moved it to North Platte,” she explained. “This is now the seventh year it has been held at the D&N Events Center.”

Since then, Shelli has worked hard to build the show up to what it is today. “When I took over, we had about 25-30 vendors that first year,” she explained. “This year’s show had 69 vendors from Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming and Kansas.”

Cindy Brader of Blue River Art travels to the show to sell her floral arrangements made from sample boots, and other country items she makes throughout the year. “I first started coming to this show when my daughter was in high school rodeo,” she explained. “I like the people and the theme of the show, so I have continued to come each year.”

Shelli said she became interested in holding the show because she needed someplace to sell her frames and furniture she has made from barnwood. “At a regular craft show, I might sell a frame, but at a show like this more of the people who are interested in western items come.”

Shelli schedules the annual show in conjunction with the Nebraska High School Rodeo Mid-Winter banquet. “Everyone with a rodeo background is usually in town that weekend, she explained. “I have tried to design this show similar to the Cowboy Christmas show they hold during the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas.”

The show draws shoppers looking for something unique. Looking at a barbwire cross at one of the displays, Tabitha said, “I come to the show just to see all the new items people have created. It is a one-of-a-kind show.”

Roy Rogers of North Platte, Neb., was checking out the horseshoe benches at the Cowgirl Arts display. “I purchased a table from her last year,” he explained of the artist. “She told me she had some new items, so I had to come check them out.”

Lisa Russell of Merna, Neb., comes to the show to help her sister at her Go West booth, which sells purses, jewelry and tack. “Everything is different at this show,” she said. “You can come here and see so many unique items you can’t find anywhere else. There is a lot of variety here.”

Variety is Shelli’s goal for the show. “I like vendors with items that appeal to everyone, whether they live in the country or the city. This year, over 2,500 people came to the show.”

Laurie Olson-Zorn of Oz Alpacas said she brings her wares to the show because of the variety. “It gives me an opportunity to show people what I have and what Alpacas can produce. It is a way to expose people to Alpaca fiber and how soft it is. It is also a great way to get my name out there.”

Stepping through the doors of the D&N Event Center the first Saturday in November is like stepping into a cowboy’s shopping mall. Everything from western crafts and frames to clothing, jewelry, and home furnishings to tack and horse trailers awaits the eager shoppers.

Shelli Arensdorf took over the show several years ago from a friend in Hershey, Neb., who held it at the Steerhead Arena. “When they moved, I took over the show and moved it to North Platte,” she explained. “This is now the seventh year it has been held at the D&N Events Center.”

Since then, Shelli has worked hard to build the show up to what it is today. “When I took over, we had about 25-30 vendors that first year,” she explained. “This year’s show had 69 vendors from Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming and Kansas.”

Cindy Brader of Blue River Art travels to the show to sell her floral arrangements made from sample boots, and other country items she makes throughout the year. “I first started coming to this show when my daughter was in high school rodeo,” she explained. “I like the people and the theme of the show, so I have continued to come each year.”

Shelli said she became interested in holding the show because she needed someplace to sell her frames and furniture she has made from barnwood. “At a regular craft show, I might sell a frame, but at a show like this more of the people who are interested in western items come.”

Shelli schedules the annual show in conjunction with the Nebraska High School Rodeo Mid-Winter banquet. “Everyone with a rodeo background is usually in town that weekend, she explained. “I have tried to design this show similar to the Cowboy Christmas show they hold during the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas.”

The show draws shoppers looking for something unique. Looking at a barbwire cross at one of the displays, Tabitha said, “I come to the show just to see all the new items people have created. It is a one-of-a-kind show.”

Roy Rogers of North Platte, Neb., was checking out the horseshoe benches at the Cowgirl Arts display. “I purchased a table from her last year,” he explained of the artist. “She told me she had some new items, so I had to come check them out.”

Lisa Russell of Merna, Neb., comes to the show to help her sister at her Go West booth, which sells purses, jewelry and tack. “Everything is different at this show,” she said. “You can come here and see so many unique items you can’t find anywhere else. There is a lot of variety here.”

Variety is Shelli’s goal for the show. “I like vendors with items that appeal to everyone, whether they live in the country or the city. This year, over 2,500 people came to the show.”

Laurie Olson-Zorn of Oz Alpacas said she brings her wares to the show because of the variety. “It gives me an opportunity to show people what I have and what Alpacas can produce. It is a way to expose people to Alpaca fiber and how soft it is. It is also a great way to get my name out there.”

Stepping through the doors of the D&N Event Center the first Saturday in November is like stepping into a cowboy’s shopping mall. Everything from western crafts and frames to clothing, jewelry, and home furnishings to tack and horse trailers awaits the eager shoppers.

Shelli Arensdorf took over the show several years ago from a friend in Hershey, Neb., who held it at the Steerhead Arena. “When they moved, I took over the show and moved it to North Platte,” she explained. “This is now the seventh year it has been held at the D&N Events Center.”

Since then, Shelli has worked hard to build the show up to what it is today. “When I took over, we had about 25-30 vendors that first year,” she explained. “This year’s show had 69 vendors from Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming and Kansas.”

Cindy Brader of Blue River Art travels to the show to sell her floral arrangements made from sample boots, and other country items she makes throughout the year. “I first started coming to this show when my daughter was in high school rodeo,” she explained. “I like the people and the theme of the show, so I have continued to come each year.”

Shelli said she became interested in holding the show because she needed someplace to sell her frames and furniture she has made from barnwood. “At a regular craft show, I might sell a frame, but at a show like this more of the people who are interested in western items come.”

Shelli schedules the annual show in conjunction with the Nebraska High School Rodeo Mid-Winter banquet. “Everyone with a rodeo background is usually in town that weekend, she explained. “I have tried to design this show similar to the Cowboy Christmas show they hold during the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas.”

The show draws shoppers looking for something unique. Looking at a barbwire cross at one of the displays, Tabitha said, “I come to the show just to see all the new items people have created. It is a one-of-a-kind show.”

Roy Rogers of North Platte, Neb., was checking out the horseshoe benches at the Cowgirl Arts display. “I purchased a table from her last year,” he explained of the artist. “She told me she had some new items, so I had to come check them out.”

Lisa Russell of Merna, Neb., comes to the show to help her sister at her Go West booth, which sells purses, jewelry and tack. “Everything is different at this show,” she said. “You can come here and see so many unique items you can’t find anywhere else. There is a lot of variety here.”

Variety is Shelli’s goal for the show. “I like vendors with items that appeal to everyone, whether they live in the country or the city. This year, over 2,500 people came to the show.”

Laurie Olson-Zorn of Oz Alpacas said she brings her wares to the show because of the variety. “It gives me an opportunity to show people what I have and what Alpacas can produce. It is a way to expose people to Alpaca fiber and how soft it is. It is also a great way to get my name out there.”

Stepping through the doors of the D&N Event Center the first Saturday in November is like stepping into a cowboy’s shopping mall. Everything from western crafts and frames to clothing, jewelry, and home furnishings to tack and horse trailers awaits the eager shoppers.

Shelli Arensdorf took over the show several years ago from a friend in Hershey, Neb., who held it at the Steerhead Arena. “When they moved, I took over the show and moved it to North Platte,” she explained. “This is now the seventh year it has been held at the D&N Events Center.”

Since then, Shelli has worked hard to build the show up to what it is today. “When I took over, we had about 25-30 vendors that first year,” she explained. “This year’s show had 69 vendors from Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming and Kansas.”

Cindy Brader of Blue River Art travels to the show to sell her floral arrangements made from sample boots, and other country items she makes throughout the year. “I first started coming to this show when my daughter was in high school rodeo,” she explained. “I like the people and the theme of the show, so I have continued to come each year.”

Shelli said she became interested in holding the show because she needed someplace to sell her frames and furniture she has made from barnwood. “At a regular craft show, I might sell a frame, but at a show like this more of the people who are interested in western items come.”

Shelli schedules the annual show in conjunction with the Nebraska High School Rodeo Mid-Winter banquet. “Everyone with a rodeo background is usually in town that weekend, she explained. “I have tried to design this show similar to the Cowboy Christmas show they hold during the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas.”

The show draws shoppers looking for something unique. Looking at a barbwire cross at one of the displays, Tabitha said, “I come to the show just to see all the new items people have created. It is a one-of-a-kind show.”

Roy Rogers of North Platte, Neb., was checking out the horseshoe benches at the Cowgirl Arts display. “I purchased a table from her last year,” he explained of the artist. “She told me she had some new items, so I had to come check them out.”

Lisa Russell of Merna, Neb., comes to the show to help her sister at her Go West booth, which sells purses, jewelry and tack. “Everything is different at this show,” she said. “You can come here and see so many unique items you can’t find anywhere else. There is a lot of variety here.”

Variety is Shelli’s goal for the show. “I like vendors with items that appeal to everyone, whether they live in the country or the city. This year, over 2,500 people came to the show.”

Laurie Olson-Zorn of Oz Alpacas said she brings her wares to the show because of the variety. “It gives me an opportunity to show people what I have and what Alpacas can produce. It is a way to expose people to Alpaca fiber and how soft it is. It is also a great way to get my name out there.”