CSU’s annual Ag Day brought in thousands of dollars for scholarship fund | TheFencePost.com

CSU’s annual Ag Day brought in thousands of dollars for scholarship fund

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr. Ft. Collins, Colo.

Robyn SchererHughes Stadium begins to fill as the teams get ready to start the game. CSU won the game 33-14 over the UNC Bears.

Football, a large barbeque and a celebration of agriculture defined the 2011 Colorado State University Ag Day. This is the 30th year of this celebration, and all of the proceeds go towards scholarships for College of Agriculture students.

The barbeque was held on Saturday, September 10, on the South side of Hughes Stadium before the kickoff of the first home game, the “Orange Out” game against the University of Northern Colorado Bears.

Thousands of people were given the opportunity to eat Colorado-grown food, which included beef, lamb, pork, potatoes, onions, milk, ice cream, watermelon, beans wheat and salad, among others. Twenty commodity groups helped to put on the event, and almost all of the workers are volunteers.

“Volunteering means engaging with others and enjoying the celebration of the great industry, which provides food and clothing for us everyday” said Elisa Sagehorn, agricultural education major at CSU. “My favorite part was connecting with people from all across the state. It is such a fantastic feeling when you can strike up a friendship because of a common appreciation for the industry. Without agriculture, we would not have the luxuries we enjoy today.”

Sagehorn is an avid advocate for agriculture from Holyoke, Colo. She served as an executive committee member on the state team for the Colorado FFA for 2008-2009, and believes agriculture is important, especially to Colorado. “Colorado is one of the leading contributors to beef in the United States. Beyond that, it is a significant employer. On a grander scale, agriculture is the backbone of our economy. Agriculture is the force which provides the basic necessities,” she said.

Other people believed in this message. Mid-way through the barbecue, a several speakers talked about the importance of Ag Day. Speakers include the Dean of Agriculture Dr. Craig Beyrouty, the commissioner of agriculture John Salazar, university athletic director Paul Kowalczyk and CSU President Tony Frank. The speakers focused on thanking those who help and past scholarship recipients.

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The proceeds of the barbecue go toward the agricultural scholarship fund, and this year 12 students were given $2,000 each. Since 2000, Ag Day has raised over $225,000 and given more than 125 scholarships to CSU agricultural science students. The students come from a variety of backgrounds.

The 2011-2012 scholarships were awarded to the following students: Andrew Bartlett, Soil and Crop Sciences major from Merino, Colo.; Jon Brammer, Agricultural Business major and Soil and Crop Sciences minor from Haxtun, Colo.; Jordan Dewing, Masters of Agricultural Sciences, Elisabeth Larson, Ag Business and Family and Consumer Science major from Barnesville, Colo.; Sarah Matlock, Equine Science major from Fort Collins, Colo.; Justin Norton, Soil and Crop Sciences major; Jason Owen, Landscape Architecture major from Denver, Colo.; Halla Pfeiff, Animal Science major from Briggsdale, Colo.; Sarah Puerner, Equine Science major, Danial Sewald, Agricultural Business major and Animal Science minor from Kiowa, Colo.; Matthew Weiderspon, Landscape Architecture and Art major from Greeley, Colo.

Ag Day not only showcases Colorado agriculture, but also the history of the school. CSU was originally an agricultural college, and when it was founded in 1870 it was known as the Agricultural College of Colorado. CSU is a land-grant university. On February 11, 1870, Governor Edward McCook that authorized the creation of the college, based on the Morrill Act. This act provided grants of public land to establish colleges.

In 1935 the name was changed to Colorado College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (Colorado A&M). In 1944 it was changed to Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical College, and finally in 1957 it was renamed Colorado State University.

Ag Day was originally started in the 1970s by “Fum” McGraw, who served as the athletic director for 10 years starting in 1976. At that time it was called “Beef Day,” but after several years was changed to what it is now, Ag Day.

The “orange out” football game, a tradition that was started last year, honors the school’s history. From 1982-1909 the school colors were pumpkin orange and alfalfa green, and the majority of community members wore orange t-shirts displaying the letter “A” for Aggies.

“Ag Day really brings CSU back to its roots,” said Ben Deline, kicker for the CSU football team and an animal science student. “It’s the one day we can really look at the past and realize where we came from.”

“Being able to play on Ag Day is better than anything else since I’m from a seedstock cow/calf operation. It really lets the football team, and everyone else know we were the Aggies, and still are,” said Deline.

Deline is an animal science student, and is looking to graduate in a year and a half. He comes from a seedstock operation in North Park, Colorado, where they run 1,000 mother cows. He is looking to go back to the ranch when he graduates. “I will definitely stay with production agriculture. I am looking forward to going back and being more involved,” he said.

Going back to the roots of the University allows those in the community to acknowledge the importance of agriculture, but also to know where CSU started.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper proclaimed Sept. 10 “CSU Ag Day” in Colorado. “CSU and its partners continue to help ensure a positive future for Colorado’s agricultural industry — an industry that plays a vital role in our state’s economy,” the proclamation reads.

Dr. Jack Whittier, Extension Beef Specialist and Associate Professor at Colorado State University, helped with the event. “Ag Day is a great way to preview the great product that we raise, feed and harvest in this state. It was evident to me this year that the “Beef, it’s what’s for dinner” ad campaign has been effective; numerous people quoted this motto as the entered the beef tent.”

Whittier has been involved with Ag Day on and off for the past 16 years, and has helped regularly the last five years. He believes it is important to educate the public about agriculture, and, “to make certain that our urban neighbors understand the importance of agriculture in providing an affordable, highly nutritious, wholesome and safe food.”

Ag Day is also a sort of “reunion” for many people in agriculture who don’t see each other often. “My favorite part is seeing old friends and acquaintances,” said Whittier.

Football, a large barbeque and a celebration of agriculture defined the 2011 Colorado State University Ag Day. This is the 30th year of this celebration, and all of the proceeds go towards scholarships for College of Agriculture students.

The barbeque was held on Saturday, September 10, on the South side of Hughes Stadium before the kickoff of the first home game, the “Orange Out” game against the University of Northern Colorado Bears.

Thousands of people were given the opportunity to eat Colorado-grown food, which included beef, lamb, pork, potatoes, onions, milk, ice cream, watermelon, beans wheat and salad, among others. Twenty commodity groups helped to put on the event, and almost all of the workers are volunteers.

“Volunteering means engaging with others and enjoying the celebration of the great industry, which provides food and clothing for us everyday” said Elisa Sagehorn, agricultural education major at CSU. “My favorite part was connecting with people from all across the state. It is such a fantastic feeling when you can strike up a friendship because of a common appreciation for the industry. Without agriculture, we would not have the luxuries we enjoy today.”

Sagehorn is an avid advocate for agriculture from Holyoke, Colo. She served as an executive committee member on the state team for the Colorado FFA for 2008-2009, and believes agriculture is important, especially to Colorado. “Colorado is one of the leading contributors to beef in the United States. Beyond that, it is a significant employer. On a grander scale, agriculture is the backbone of our economy. Agriculture is the force which provides the basic necessities,” she said.

Other people believed in this message. Mid-way through the barbecue, a several speakers talked about the importance of Ag Day. Speakers include the Dean of Agriculture Dr. Craig Beyrouty, the commissioner of agriculture John Salazar, university athletic director Paul Kowalczyk and CSU President Tony Frank. The speakers focused on thanking those who help and past scholarship recipients.

The proceeds of the barbecue go toward the agricultural scholarship fund, and this year 12 students were given $2,000 each. Since 2000, Ag Day has raised over $225,000 and given more than 125 scholarships to CSU agricultural science students. The students come from a variety of backgrounds.

The 2011-2012 scholarships were awarded to the following students: Andrew Bartlett, Soil and Crop Sciences major from Merino, Colo.; Jon Brammer, Agricultural Business major and Soil and Crop Sciences minor from Haxtun, Colo.; Jordan Dewing, Masters of Agricultural Sciences, Elisabeth Larson, Ag Business and Family and Consumer Science major from Barnesville, Colo.; Sarah Matlock, Equine Science major from Fort Collins, Colo.; Justin Norton, Soil and Crop Sciences major; Jason Owen, Landscape Architecture major from Denver, Colo.; Halla Pfeiff, Animal Science major from Briggsdale, Colo.; Sarah Puerner, Equine Science major, Danial Sewald, Agricultural Business major and Animal Science minor from Kiowa, Colo.; Matthew Weiderspon, Landscape Architecture and Art major from Greeley, Colo.

Ag Day not only showcases Colorado agriculture, but also the history of the school. CSU was originally an agricultural college, and when it was founded in 1870 it was known as the Agricultural College of Colorado. CSU is a land-grant university. On February 11, 1870, Governor Edward McCook that authorized the creation of the college, based on the Morrill Act. This act provided grants of public land to establish colleges.

In 1935 the name was changed to Colorado College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (Colorado A&M). In 1944 it was changed to Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical College, and finally in 1957 it was renamed Colorado State University.

Ag Day was originally started in the 1970s by “Fum” McGraw, who served as the athletic director for 10 years starting in 1976. At that time it was called “Beef Day,” but after several years was changed to what it is now, Ag Day.

The “orange out” football game, a tradition that was started last year, honors the school’s history. From 1982-1909 the school colors were pumpkin orange and alfalfa green, and the majority of community members wore orange t-shirts displaying the letter “A” for Aggies.

“Ag Day really brings CSU back to its roots,” said Ben Deline, kicker for the CSU football team and an animal science student. “It’s the one day we can really look at the past and realize where we came from.”

“Being able to play on Ag Day is better than anything else since I’m from a seedstock cow/calf operation. It really lets the football team, and everyone else know we were the Aggies, and still are,” said Deline.

Deline is an animal science student, and is looking to graduate in a year and a half. He comes from a seedstock operation in North Park, Colorado, where they run 1,000 mother cows. He is looking to go back to the ranch when he graduates. “I will definitely stay with production agriculture. I am looking forward to going back and being more involved,” he said.

Going back to the roots of the University allows those in the community to acknowledge the importance of agriculture, but also to know where CSU started.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper proclaimed Sept. 10 “CSU Ag Day” in Colorado. “CSU and its partners continue to help ensure a positive future for Colorado’s agricultural industry — an industry that plays a vital role in our state’s economy,” the proclamation reads.

Dr. Jack Whittier, Extension Beef Specialist and Associate Professor at Colorado State University, helped with the event. “Ag Day is a great way to preview the great product that we raise, feed and harvest in this state. It was evident to me this year that the “Beef, it’s what’s for dinner” ad campaign has been effective; numerous people quoted this motto as the entered the beef tent.”

Whittier has been involved with Ag Day on and off for the past 16 years, and has helped regularly the last five years. He believes it is important to educate the public about agriculture, and, “to make certain that our urban neighbors understand the importance of agriculture in providing an affordable, highly nutritious, wholesome and safe food.”

Ag Day is also a sort of “reunion” for many people in agriculture who don’t see each other often. “My favorite part is seeing old friends and acquaintances,” said Whittier.

Football, a large barbeque and a celebration of agriculture defined the 2011 Colorado State University Ag Day. This is the 30th year of this celebration, and all of the proceeds go towards scholarships for College of Agriculture students.

The barbeque was held on Saturday, September 10, on the South side of Hughes Stadium before the kickoff of the first home game, the “Orange Out” game against the University of Northern Colorado Bears.

Thousands of people were given the opportunity to eat Colorado-grown food, which included beef, lamb, pork, potatoes, onions, milk, ice cream, watermelon, beans wheat and salad, among others. Twenty commodity groups helped to put on the event, and almost all of the workers are volunteers.

“Volunteering means engaging with others and enjoying the celebration of the great industry, which provides food and clothing for us everyday” said Elisa Sagehorn, agricultural education major at CSU. “My favorite part was connecting with people from all across the state. It is such a fantastic feeling when you can strike up a friendship because of a common appreciation for the industry. Without agriculture, we would not have the luxuries we enjoy today.”

Sagehorn is an avid advocate for agriculture from Holyoke, Colo. She served as an executive committee member on the state team for the Colorado FFA for 2008-2009, and believes agriculture is important, especially to Colorado. “Colorado is one of the leading contributors to beef in the United States. Beyond that, it is a significant employer. On a grander scale, agriculture is the backbone of our economy. Agriculture is the force which provides the basic necessities,” she said.

Other people believed in this message. Mid-way through the barbecue, a several speakers talked about the importance of Ag Day. Speakers include the Dean of Agriculture Dr. Craig Beyrouty, the commissioner of agriculture John Salazar, university athletic director Paul Kowalczyk and CSU President Tony Frank. The speakers focused on thanking those who help and past scholarship recipients.

The proceeds of the barbecue go toward the agricultural scholarship fund, and this year 12 students were given $2,000 each. Since 2000, Ag Day has raised over $225,000 and given more than 125 scholarships to CSU agricultural science students. The students come from a variety of backgrounds.

The 2011-2012 scholarships were awarded to the following students: Andrew Bartlett, Soil and Crop Sciences major from Merino, Colo.; Jon Brammer, Agricultural Business major and Soil and Crop Sciences minor from Haxtun, Colo.; Jordan Dewing, Masters of Agricultural Sciences, Elisabeth Larson, Ag Business and Family and Consumer Science major from Barnesville, Colo.; Sarah Matlock, Equine Science major from Fort Collins, Colo.; Justin Norton, Soil and Crop Sciences major; Jason Owen, Landscape Architecture major from Denver, Colo.; Halla Pfeiff, Animal Science major from Briggsdale, Colo.; Sarah Puerner, Equine Science major, Danial Sewald, Agricultural Business major and Animal Science minor from Kiowa, Colo.; Matthew Weiderspon, Landscape Architecture and Art major from Greeley, Colo.

Ag Day not only showcases Colorado agriculture, but also the history of the school. CSU was originally an agricultural college, and when it was founded in 1870 it was known as the Agricultural College of Colorado. CSU is a land-grant university. On February 11, 1870, Governor Edward McCook that authorized the creation of the college, based on the Morrill Act. This act provided grants of public land to establish colleges.

In 1935 the name was changed to Colorado College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (Colorado A&M). In 1944 it was changed to Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical College, and finally in 1957 it was renamed Colorado State University.

Ag Day was originally started in the 1970s by “Fum” McGraw, who served as the athletic director for 10 years starting in 1976. At that time it was called “Beef Day,” but after several years was changed to what it is now, Ag Day.

The “orange out” football game, a tradition that was started last year, honors the school’s history. From 1982-1909 the school colors were pumpkin orange and alfalfa green, and the majority of community members wore orange t-shirts displaying the letter “A” for Aggies.

“Ag Day really brings CSU back to its roots,” said Ben Deline, kicker for the CSU football team and an animal science student. “It’s the one day we can really look at the past and realize where we came from.”

“Being able to play on Ag Day is better than anything else since I’m from a seedstock cow/calf operation. It really lets the football team, and everyone else know we were the Aggies, and still are,” said Deline.

Deline is an animal science student, and is looking to graduate in a year and a half. He comes from a seedstock operation in North Park, Colorado, where they run 1,000 mother cows. He is looking to go back to the ranch when he graduates. “I will definitely stay with production agriculture. I am looking forward to going back and being more involved,” he said.

Going back to the roots of the University allows those in the community to acknowledge the importance of agriculture, but also to know where CSU started.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper proclaimed Sept. 10 “CSU Ag Day” in Colorado. “CSU and its partners continue to help ensure a positive future for Colorado’s agricultural industry — an industry that plays a vital role in our state’s economy,” the proclamation reads.

Dr. Jack Whittier, Extension Beef Specialist and Associate Professor at Colorado State University, helped with the event. “Ag Day is a great way to preview the great product that we raise, feed and harvest in this state. It was evident to me this year that the “Beef, it’s what’s for dinner” ad campaign has been effective; numerous people quoted this motto as the entered the beef tent.”

Whittier has been involved with Ag Day on and off for the past 16 years, and has helped regularly the last five years. He believes it is important to educate the public about agriculture, and, “to make certain that our urban neighbors understand the importance of agriculture in providing an affordable, highly nutritious, wholesome and safe food.”

Ag Day is also a sort of “reunion” for many people in agriculture who don’t see each other often. “My favorite part is seeing old friends and acquaintances,” said Whittier.

Football, a large barbeque and a celebration of agriculture defined the 2011 Colorado State University Ag Day. This is the 30th year of this celebration, and all of the proceeds go towards scholarships for College of Agriculture students.

The barbeque was held on Saturday, September 10, on the South side of Hughes Stadium before the kickoff of the first home game, the “Orange Out” game against the University of Northern Colorado Bears.

Thousands of people were given the opportunity to eat Colorado-grown food, which included beef, lamb, pork, potatoes, onions, milk, ice cream, watermelon, beans wheat and salad, among others. Twenty commodity groups helped to put on the event, and almost all of the workers are volunteers.

“Volunteering means engaging with others and enjoying the celebration of the great industry, which provides food and clothing for us everyday” said Elisa Sagehorn, agricultural education major at CSU. “My favorite part was connecting with people from all across the state. It is such a fantastic feeling when you can strike up a friendship because of a common appreciation for the industry. Without agriculture, we would not have the luxuries we enjoy today.”

Sagehorn is an avid advocate for agriculture from Holyoke, Colo. She served as an executive committee member on the state team for the Colorado FFA for 2008-2009, and believes agriculture is important, especially to Colorado. “Colorado is one of the leading contributors to beef in the United States. Beyond that, it is a significant employer. On a grander scale, agriculture is the backbone of our economy. Agriculture is the force which provides the basic necessities,” she said.

Other people believed in this message. Mid-way through the barbecue, a several speakers talked about the importance of Ag Day. Speakers include the Dean of Agriculture Dr. Craig Beyrouty, the commissioner of agriculture John Salazar, university athletic director Paul Kowalczyk and CSU President Tony Frank. The speakers focused on thanking those who help and past scholarship recipients.

The proceeds of the barbecue go toward the agricultural scholarship fund, and this year 12 students were given $2,000 each. Since 2000, Ag Day has raised over $225,000 and given more than 125 scholarships to CSU agricultural science students. The students come from a variety of backgrounds.

The 2011-2012 scholarships were awarded to the following students: Andrew Bartlett, Soil and Crop Sciences major from Merino, Colo.; Jon Brammer, Agricultural Business major and Soil and Crop Sciences minor from Haxtun, Colo.; Jordan Dewing, Masters of Agricultural Sciences, Elisabeth Larson, Ag Business and Family and Consumer Science major from Barnesville, Colo.; Sarah Matlock, Equine Science major from Fort Collins, Colo.; Justin Norton, Soil and Crop Sciences major; Jason Owen, Landscape Architecture major from Denver, Colo.; Halla Pfeiff, Animal Science major from Briggsdale, Colo.; Sarah Puerner, Equine Science major, Danial Sewald, Agricultural Business major and Animal Science minor from Kiowa, Colo.; Matthew Weiderspon, Landscape Architecture and Art major from Greeley, Colo.

Ag Day not only showcases Colorado agriculture, but also the history of the school. CSU was originally an agricultural college, and when it was founded in 1870 it was known as the Agricultural College of Colorado. CSU is a land-grant university. On February 11, 1870, Governor Edward McCook that authorized the creation of the college, based on the Morrill Act. This act provided grants of public land to establish colleges.

In 1935 the name was changed to Colorado College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (Colorado A&M). In 1944 it was changed to Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical College, and finally in 1957 it was renamed Colorado State University.

Ag Day was originally started in the 1970s by “Fum” McGraw, who served as the athletic director for 10 years starting in 1976. At that time it was called “Beef Day,” but after several years was changed to what it is now, Ag Day.

The “orange out” football game, a tradition that was started last year, honors the school’s history. From 1982-1909 the school colors were pumpkin orange and alfalfa green, and the majority of community members wore orange t-shirts displaying the letter “A” for Aggies.

“Ag Day really brings CSU back to its roots,” said Ben Deline, kicker for the CSU football team and an animal science student. “It’s the one day we can really look at the past and realize where we came from.”

“Being able to play on Ag Day is better than anything else since I’m from a seedstock cow/calf operation. It really lets the football team, and everyone else know we were the Aggies, and still are,” said Deline.

Deline is an animal science student, and is looking to graduate in a year and a half. He comes from a seedstock operation in North Park, Colorado, where they run 1,000 mother cows. He is looking to go back to the ranch when he graduates. “I will definitely stay with production agriculture. I am looking forward to going back and being more involved,” he said.

Going back to the roots of the University allows those in the community to acknowledge the importance of agriculture, but also to know where CSU started.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper proclaimed Sept. 10 “CSU Ag Day” in Colorado. “CSU and its partners continue to help ensure a positive future for Colorado’s agricultural industry — an industry that plays a vital role in our state’s economy,” the proclamation reads.

Dr. Jack Whittier, Extension Beef Specialist and Associate Professor at Colorado State University, helped with the event. “Ag Day is a great way to preview the great product that we raise, feed and harvest in this state. It was evident to me this year that the “Beef, it’s what’s for dinner” ad campaign has been effective; numerous people quoted this motto as the entered the beef tent.”

Whittier has been involved with Ag Day on and off for the past 16 years, and has helped regularly the last five years. He believes it is important to educate the public about agriculture, and, “to make certain that our urban neighbors understand the importance of agriculture in providing an affordable, highly nutritious, wholesome and safe food.”

Ag Day is also a sort of “reunion” for many people in agriculture who don’t see each other often. “My favorite part is seeing old friends and acquaintances,” said Whittier.

Football, a large barbeque and a celebration of agriculture defined the 2011 Colorado State University Ag Day. This is the 30th year of this celebration, and all of the proceeds go towards scholarships for College of Agriculture students.

The barbeque was held on Saturday, September 10, on the South side of Hughes Stadium before the kickoff of the first home game, the “Orange Out” game against the University of Northern Colorado Bears.

Thousands of people were given the opportunity to eat Colorado-grown food, which included beef, lamb, pork, potatoes, onions, milk, ice cream, watermelon, beans wheat and salad, among others. Twenty commodity groups helped to put on the event, and almost all of the workers are volunteers.

“Volunteering means engaging with others and enjoying the celebration of the great industry, which provides food and clothing for us everyday” said Elisa Sagehorn, agricultural education major at CSU. “My favorite part was connecting with people from all across the state. It is such a fantastic feeling when you can strike up a friendship because of a common appreciation for the industry. Without agriculture, we would not have the luxuries we enjoy today.”

Sagehorn is an avid advocate for agriculture from Holyoke, Colo. She served as an executive committee member on the state team for the Colorado FFA for 2008-2009, and believes agriculture is important, especially to Colorado. “Colorado is one of the leading contributors to beef in the United States. Beyond that, it is a significant employer. On a grander scale, agriculture is the backbone of our economy. Agriculture is the force which provides the basic necessities,” she said.

Other people believed in this message. Mid-way through the barbecue, a several speakers talked about the importance of Ag Day. Speakers include the Dean of Agriculture Dr. Craig Beyrouty, the commissioner of agriculture John Salazar, university athletic director Paul Kowalczyk and CSU President Tony Frank. The speakers focused on thanking those who help and past scholarship recipients.

The proceeds of the barbecue go toward the agricultural scholarship fund, and this year 12 students were given $2,000 each. Since 2000, Ag Day has raised over $225,000 and given more than 125 scholarships to CSU agricultural science students. The students come from a variety of backgrounds.

The 2011-2012 scholarships were awarded to the following students: Andrew Bartlett, Soil and Crop Sciences major from Merino, Colo.; Jon Brammer, Agricultural Business major and Soil and Crop Sciences minor from Haxtun, Colo.; Jordan Dewing, Masters of Agricultural Sciences, Elisabeth Larson, Ag Business and Family and Consumer Science major from Barnesville, Colo.; Sarah Matlock, Equine Science major from Fort Collins, Colo.; Justin Norton, Soil and Crop Sciences major; Jason Owen, Landscape Architecture major from Denver, Colo.; Halla Pfeiff, Animal Science major from Briggsdale, Colo.; Sarah Puerner, Equine Science major, Danial Sewald, Agricultural Business major and Animal Science minor from Kiowa, Colo.; Matthew Weiderspon, Landscape Architecture and Art major from Greeley, Colo.

Ag Day not only showcases Colorado agriculture, but also the history of the school. CSU was originally an agricultural college, and when it was founded in 1870 it was known as the Agricultural College of Colorado. CSU is a land-grant university. On February 11, 1870, Governor Edward McCook that authorized the creation of the college, based on the Morrill Act. This act provided grants of public land to establish colleges.

In 1935 the name was changed to Colorado College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (Colorado A&M). In 1944 it was changed to Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical College, and finally in 1957 it was renamed Colorado State University.

Ag Day was originally started in the 1970s by “Fum” McGraw, who served as the athletic director for 10 years starting in 1976. At that time it was called “Beef Day,” but after several years was changed to what it is now, Ag Day.

The “orange out” football game, a tradition that was started last year, honors the school’s history. From 1982-1909 the school colors were pumpkin orange and alfalfa green, and the majority of community members wore orange t-shirts displaying the letter “A” for Aggies.

“Ag Day really brings CSU back to its roots,” said Ben Deline, kicker for the CSU football team and an animal science student. “It’s the one day we can really look at the past and realize where we came from.”

“Being able to play on Ag Day is better than anything else since I’m from a seedstock cow/calf operation. It really lets the football team, and everyone else know we were the Aggies, and still are,” said Deline.

Deline is an animal science student, and is looking to graduate in a year and a half. He comes from a seedstock operation in North Park, Colorado, where they run 1,000 mother cows. He is looking to go back to the ranch when he graduates. “I will definitely stay with production agriculture. I am looking forward to going back and being more involved,” he said.

Going back to the roots of the University allows those in the community to acknowledge the importance of agriculture, but also to know where CSU started.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper proclaimed Sept. 10 “CSU Ag Day” in Colorado. “CSU and its partners continue to help ensure a positive future for Colorado’s agricultural industry — an industry that plays a vital role in our state’s economy,” the proclamation reads.

Dr. Jack Whittier, Extension Beef Specialist and Associate Professor at Colorado State University, helped with the event. “Ag Day is a great way to preview the great product that we raise, feed and harvest in this state. It was evident to me this year that the “Beef, it’s what’s for dinner” ad campaign has been effective; numerous people quoted this motto as the entered the beef tent.”

Whittier has been involved with Ag Day on and off for the past 16 years, and has helped regularly the last five years. He believes it is important to educate the public about agriculture, and, “to make certain that our urban neighbors understand the importance of agriculture in providing an affordable, highly nutritious, wholesome and safe food.”

Ag Day is also a sort of “reunion” for many people in agriculture who don’t see each other often. “My favorite part is seeing old friends and acquaintances,” said Whittier.

Football, a large barbeque and a celebration of agriculture defined the 2011 Colorado State University Ag Day. This is the 30th year of this celebration, and all of the proceeds go towards scholarships for College of Agriculture students.

The barbeque was held on Saturday, September 10, on the South side of Hughes Stadium before the kickoff of the first home game, the “Orange Out” game against the University of Northern Colorado Bears.

Thousands of people were given the opportunity to eat Colorado-grown food, which included beef, lamb, pork, potatoes, onions, milk, ice cream, watermelon, beans wheat and salad, among others. Twenty commodity groups helped to put on the event, and almost all of the workers are volunteers.

“Volunteering means engaging with others and enjoying the celebration of the great industry, which provides food and clothing for us everyday” said Elisa Sagehorn, agricultural education major at CSU. “My favorite part was connecting with people from all across the state. It is such a fantastic feeling when you can strike up a friendship because of a common appreciation for the industry. Without agriculture, we would not have the luxuries we enjoy today.”

Sagehorn is an avid advocate for agriculture from Holyoke, Colo. She served as an executive committee member on the state team for the Colorado FFA for 2008-2009, and believes agriculture is important, especially to Colorado. “Colorado is one of the leading contributors to beef in the United States. Beyond that, it is a significant employer. On a grander scale, agriculture is the backbone of our economy. Agriculture is the force which provides the basic necessities,” she said.

Other people believed in this message. Mid-way through the barbecue, a several speakers talked about the importance of Ag Day. Speakers include the Dean of Agriculture Dr. Craig Beyrouty, the commissioner of agriculture John Salazar, university athletic director Paul Kowalczyk and CSU President Tony Frank. The speakers focused on thanking those who help and past scholarship recipients.

The proceeds of the barbecue go toward the agricultural scholarship fund, and this year 12 students were given $2,000 each. Since 2000, Ag Day has raised over $225,000 and given more than 125 scholarships to CSU agricultural science students. The students come from a variety of backgrounds.

The 2011-2012 scholarships were awarded to the following students: Andrew Bartlett, Soil and Crop Sciences major from Merino, Colo.; Jon Brammer, Agricultural Business major and Soil and Crop Sciences minor from Haxtun, Colo.; Jordan Dewing, Masters of Agricultural Sciences, Elisabeth Larson, Ag Business and Family and Consumer Science major from Barnesville, Colo.; Sarah Matlock, Equine Science major from Fort Collins, Colo.; Justin Norton, Soil and Crop Sciences major; Jason Owen, Landscape Architecture major from Denver, Colo.; Halla Pfeiff, Animal Science major from Briggsdale, Colo.; Sarah Puerner, Equine Science major, Danial Sewald, Agricultural Business major and Animal Science minor from Kiowa, Colo.; Matthew Weiderspon, Landscape Architecture and Art major from Greeley, Colo.

Ag Day not only showcases Colorado agriculture, but also the history of the school. CSU was originally an agricultural college, and when it was founded in 1870 it was known as the Agricultural College of Colorado. CSU is a land-grant university. On February 11, 1870, Governor Edward McCook that authorized the creation of the college, based on the Morrill Act. This act provided grants of public land to establish colleges.

In 1935 the name was changed to Colorado College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (Colorado A&M). In 1944 it was changed to Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical College, and finally in 1957 it was renamed Colorado State University.

Ag Day was originally started in the 1970s by “Fum” McGraw, who served as the athletic director for 10 years starting in 1976. At that time it was called “Beef Day,” but after several years was changed to what it is now, Ag Day.

The “orange out” football game, a tradition that was started last year, honors the school’s history. From 1982-1909 the school colors were pumpkin orange and alfalfa green, and the majority of community members wore orange t-shirts displaying the letter “A” for Aggies.

“Ag Day really brings CSU back to its roots,” said Ben Deline, kicker for the CSU football team and an animal science student. “It’s the one day we can really look at the past and realize where we came from.”

“Being able to play on Ag Day is better than anything else since I’m from a seedstock cow/calf operation. It really lets the football team, and everyone else know we were the Aggies, and still are,” said Deline.

Deline is an animal science student, and is looking to graduate in a year and a half. He comes from a seedstock operation in North Park, Colorado, where they run 1,000 mother cows. He is looking to go back to the ranch when he graduates. “I will definitely stay with production agriculture. I am looking forward to going back and being more involved,” he said.

Going back to the roots of the University allows those in the community to acknowledge the importance of agriculture, but also to know where CSU started.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper proclaimed Sept. 10 “CSU Ag Day” in Colorado. “CSU and its partners continue to help ensure a positive future for Colorado’s agricultural industry — an industry that plays a vital role in our state’s economy,” the proclamation reads.

Dr. Jack Whittier, Extension Beef Specialist and Associate Professor at Colorado State University, helped with the event. “Ag Day is a great way to preview the great product that we raise, feed and harvest in this state. It was evident to me this year that the “Beef, it’s what’s for dinner” ad campaign has been effective; numerous people quoted this motto as the entered the beef tent.”

Whittier has been involved with Ag Day on and off for the past 16 years, and has helped regularly the last five years. He believes it is important to educate the public about agriculture, and, “to make certain that our urban neighbors understand the importance of agriculture in providing an affordable, highly nutritious, wholesome and safe food.”

Ag Day is also a sort of “reunion” for many people in agriculture who don’t see each other often. “My favorite part is seeing old friends and acquaintances,” said Whittier.