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Dawes County History in Action celebrated at the museum

Beth Gibbons demonstrated sewing on a 1870 New Home treadle sewing machine. She received help from her grandchildren turning the wheel and watching the machine sew at the history day.

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A crowd of at least 440 interested people signed the guest book at the 13th annual History in Action Day at the Dawes County Museum on a perfect 90 degree day. Tom Serres said, “We bettered our attendance record from last year.”

Guests of all ages attended from a two month old baby on up. Many visitors took the time to stroll through the museum to see the many exhibits and research books that are available free to the public to use. All workers at this well-kept free museum are volunteers.

History Day Organizer Chairman, Tom Serres, invited demonstrators to show their talents and offerings to the public. Mary Vetter came wearing her decorated Native American dress she had made. Ron Weinteer was around to help where needed. Belle Lecher, wearing a long dress and matching bonnet she made, was everywhere asking questions and making herself available to help. Doctor Gamby did wheat grinding demonstrations south of the buildings.



There were tractor hay rides, a horse hay ride, a church choir (Emanuel Lutheran Church) in the old church, Warren Roos, a former railroader, answered questions about the old green caboose. Little ones especially found the caboose fun to climb in. Tom Ahrens demonstrated making apple juice by running fresh apples through a juicer. Lots of little ones volunteered to help Tom turn the handle.

Jeannie Gore Lesmeister had her spinning wheel and articles she had crocheted from different fibers. Among the many items there was a baby bonnet made from her rabbit’s fur and another shawl from a goat’s fur and a hat from dog fur. Vicki Kotschwar and Alice Serres called the school to order and showed some things about going to school in the little country school.



Sheris Dojcsany milked her pet goat and served glasses of chilled goat’s milk. It was rich but good. Judy Pinkerton made and distributed bags of popcorn which were enjoyed by all. Sharla Maginnis performed her rope demonstration. Beth Gibbons demonstrated sewing on an ancient 1870 New Home Sewing Machine. A little girl gratefully accepted the dolly blanket that was made.

“The Music Makers” of Chadron, Hay Springs and Rushville, did an outstanding job entertaining. Harmonica player, Ivan Hinman, wore his cowboy chaps that he said were worn in a tour in England many years ago. The chaps have the brand V- on the side. He also carried his cowboy rope. Arlene Masek played a washboard, as did Doris McKillip and Mary Morris. Dennis McKillip played the guitar and Bertha Landreth played her accordion while her daughter Bee played the guitar. They were good without knowing any music notes. Arlene said they play by ear. There was also some great music by a vocal duet of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Cunningham of Chadron accompanied by his guitar.

Brian Roberts took guests on hay rides around the area. Roger Wess demonstrated the corn sheller. Judy Hawthorne offered samples of different jellies on crackers. Onion jelly? She recommended it with meats.

Lila Ahrens, Shirley Ahrens, Evelyn Reed, Warren Ross and others took turns trying to coax butter from the cream. Fresh butter on home made biscuits was a real treat to many guests of the day. Some came back time after time. Little ones stood around and asked, “What are they doing?”

Some visitors and performers dressed in cowboy hats and chaps while their ladies wore long dresses. Anyone wishing to visit the museum during the winter months/after hours or for questions, contact Belle Lecher at (308) 432-2309.

A crowd of at least 440 interested people signed the guest book at the 13th annual History in Action Day at the Dawes County Museum on a perfect 90 degree day. Tom Serres said, “We bettered our attendance record from last year.”

Guests of all ages attended from a two month old baby on up. Many visitors took the time to stroll through the museum to see the many exhibits and research books that are available free to the public to use. All workers at this well-kept free museum are volunteers.

History Day Organizer Chairman, Tom Serres, invited demonstrators to show their talents and offerings to the public. Mary Vetter came wearing her decorated Native American dress she had made. Ron Weinteer was around to help where needed. Belle Lecher, wearing a long dress and matching bonnet she made, was everywhere asking questions and making herself available to help. Doctor Gamby did wheat grinding demonstrations south of the buildings.

There were tractor hay rides, a horse hay ride, a church choir (Emanuel Lutheran Church) in the old church, Warren Roos, a former railroader, answered questions about the old green caboose. Little ones especially found the caboose fun to climb in. Tom Ahrens demonstrated making apple juice by running fresh apples through a juicer. Lots of little ones volunteered to help Tom turn the handle.

Jeannie Gore Lesmeister had her spinning wheel and articles she had crocheted from different fibers. Among the many items there was a baby bonnet made from her rabbit’s fur and another shawl from a goat’s fur and a hat from dog fur. Vicki Kotschwar and Alice Serres called the school to order and showed some things about going to school in the little country school.

Sheris Dojcsany milked her pet goat and served glasses of chilled goat’s milk. It was rich but good. Judy Pinkerton made and distributed bags of popcorn which were enjoyed by all. Sharla Maginnis performed her rope demonstration. Beth Gibbons demonstrated sewing on an ancient 1870 New Home Sewing Machine. A little girl gratefully accepted the dolly blanket that was made.

“The Music Makers” of Chadron, Hay Springs and Rushville, did an outstanding job entertaining. Harmonica player, Ivan Hinman, wore his cowboy chaps that he said were worn in a tour in England many years ago. The chaps have the brand V- on the side. He also carried his cowboy rope. Arlene Masek played a washboard, as did Doris McKillip and Mary Morris. Dennis McKillip played the guitar and Bertha Landreth played her accordion while her daughter Bee played the guitar. They were good without knowing any music notes. Arlene said they play by ear. There was also some great music by a vocal duet of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Cunningham of Chadron accompanied by his guitar.

Brian Roberts took guests on hay rides around the area. Roger Wess demonstrated the corn sheller. Judy Hawthorne offered samples of different jellies on crackers. Onion jelly? She recommended it with meats.

Lila Ahrens, Shirley Ahrens, Evelyn Reed, Warren Ross and others took turns trying to coax butter from the cream. Fresh butter on home made biscuits was a real treat to many guests of the day. Some came back time after time. Little ones stood around and asked, “What are they doing?”

Some visitors and performers dressed in cowboy hats and chaps while their ladies wore long dresses. Anyone wishing to visit the museum during the winter months/after hours or for questions, contact Belle Lecher at (308) 432-2309.

A crowd of at least 440 interested people signed the guest book at the 13th annual History in Action Day at the Dawes County Museum on a perfect 90 degree day. Tom Serres said, “We bettered our attendance record from last year.”

Guests of all ages attended from a two month old baby on up. Many visitors took the time to stroll through the museum to see the many exhibits and research books that are available free to the public to use. All workers at this well-kept free museum are volunteers.

History Day Organizer Chairman, Tom Serres, invited demonstrators to show their talents and offerings to the public. Mary Vetter came wearing her decorated Native American dress she had made. Ron Weinteer was around to help where needed. Belle Lecher, wearing a long dress and matching bonnet she made, was everywhere asking questions and making herself available to help. Doctor Gamby did wheat grinding demonstrations south of the buildings.

There were tractor hay rides, a horse hay ride, a church choir (Emanuel Lutheran Church) in the old church, Warren Roos, a former railroader, answered questions about the old green caboose. Little ones especially found the caboose fun to climb in. Tom Ahrens demonstrated making apple juice by running fresh apples through a juicer. Lots of little ones volunteered to help Tom turn the handle.

Jeannie Gore Lesmeister had her spinning wheel and articles she had crocheted from different fibers. Among the many items there was a baby bonnet made from her rabbit’s fur and another shawl from a goat’s fur and a hat from dog fur. Vicki Kotschwar and Alice Serres called the school to order and showed some things about going to school in the little country school.

Sheris Dojcsany milked her pet goat and served glasses of chilled goat’s milk. It was rich but good. Judy Pinkerton made and distributed bags of popcorn which were enjoyed by all. Sharla Maginnis performed her rope demonstration. Beth Gibbons demonstrated sewing on an ancient 1870 New Home Sewing Machine. A little girl gratefully accepted the dolly blanket that was made.

“The Music Makers” of Chadron, Hay Springs and Rushville, did an outstanding job entertaining. Harmonica player, Ivan Hinman, wore his cowboy chaps that he said were worn in a tour in England many years ago. The chaps have the brand V- on the side. He also carried his cowboy rope. Arlene Masek played a washboard, as did Doris McKillip and Mary Morris. Dennis McKillip played the guitar and Bertha Landreth played her accordion while her daughter Bee played the guitar. They were good without knowing any music notes. Arlene said they play by ear. There was also some great music by a vocal duet of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Cunningham of Chadron accompanied by his guitar.

Brian Roberts took guests on hay rides around the area. Roger Wess demonstrated the corn sheller. Judy Hawthorne offered samples of different jellies on crackers. Onion jelly? She recommended it with meats.

Lila Ahrens, Shirley Ahrens, Evelyn Reed, Warren Ross and others took turns trying to coax butter from the cream. Fresh butter on home made biscuits was a real treat to many guests of the day. Some came back time after time. Little ones stood around and asked, “What are they doing?”

Some visitors and performers dressed in cowboy hats and chaps while their ladies wore long dresses. Anyone wishing to visit the museum during the winter months/after hours or for questions, contact Belle Lecher at (308) 432-2309.

A crowd of at least 440 interested people signed the guest book at the 13th annual History in Action Day at the Dawes County Museum on a perfect 90 degree day. Tom Serres said, “We bettered our attendance record from last year.”

Guests of all ages attended from a two month old baby on up. Many visitors took the time to stroll through the museum to see the many exhibits and research books that are available free to the public to use. All workers at this well-kept free museum are volunteers.

History Day Organizer Chairman, Tom Serres, invited demonstrators to show their talents and offerings to the public. Mary Vetter came wearing her decorated Native American dress she had made. Ron Weinteer was around to help where needed. Belle Lecher, wearing a long dress and matching bonnet she made, was everywhere asking questions and making herself available to help. Doctor Gamby did wheat grinding demonstrations south of the buildings.

There were tractor hay rides, a horse hay ride, a church choir (Emanuel Lutheran Church) in the old church, Warren Roos, a former railroader, answered questions about the old green caboose. Little ones especially found the caboose fun to climb in. Tom Ahrens demonstrated making apple juice by running fresh apples through a juicer. Lots of little ones volunteered to help Tom turn the handle.

Jeannie Gore Lesmeister had her spinning wheel and articles she had crocheted from different fibers. Among the many items there was a baby bonnet made from her rabbit’s fur and another shawl from a goat’s fur and a hat from dog fur. Vicki Kotschwar and Alice Serres called the school to order and showed some things about going to school in the little country school.

Sheris Dojcsany milked her pet goat and served glasses of chilled goat’s milk. It was rich but good. Judy Pinkerton made and distributed bags of popcorn which were enjoyed by all. Sharla Maginnis performed her rope demonstration. Beth Gibbons demonstrated sewing on an ancient 1870 New Home Sewing Machine. A little girl gratefully accepted the dolly blanket that was made.

“The Music Makers” of Chadron, Hay Springs and Rushville, did an outstanding job entertaining. Harmonica player, Ivan Hinman, wore his cowboy chaps that he said were worn in a tour in England many years ago. The chaps have the brand V- on the side. He also carried his cowboy rope. Arlene Masek played a washboard, as did Doris McKillip and Mary Morris. Dennis McKillip played the guitar and Bertha Landreth played her accordion while her daughter Bee played the guitar. They were good without knowing any music notes. Arlene said they play by ear. There was also some great music by a vocal duet of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Cunningham of Chadron accompanied by his guitar.

Brian Roberts took guests on hay rides around the area. Roger Wess demonstrated the corn sheller. Judy Hawthorne offered samples of different jellies on crackers. Onion jelly? She recommended it with meats.

Lila Ahrens, Shirley Ahrens, Evelyn Reed, Warren Ross and others took turns trying to coax butter from the cream. Fresh butter on home made biscuits was a real treat to many guests of the day. Some came back time after time. Little ones stood around and asked, “What are they doing?”

Some visitors and performers dressed in cowboy hats and chaps while their ladies wore long dresses. Anyone wishing to visit the museum during the winter months/after hours or for questions, contact Belle Lecher at (308) 432-2309.

A crowd of at least 440 interested people signed the guest book at the 13th annual History in Action Day at the Dawes County Museum on a perfect 90 degree day. Tom Serres said, “We bettered our attendance record from last year.”

Guests of all ages attended from a two month old baby on up. Many visitors took the time to stroll through the museum to see the many exhibits and research books that are available free to the public to use. All workers at this well-kept free museum are volunteers.

History Day Organizer Chairman, Tom Serres, invited demonstrators to show their talents and offerings to the public. Mary Vetter came wearing her decorated Native American dress she had made. Ron Weinteer was around to help where needed. Belle Lecher, wearing a long dress and matching bonnet she made, was everywhere asking questions and making herself available to help. Doctor Gamby did wheat grinding demonstrations south of the buildings.

There were tractor hay rides, a horse hay ride, a church choir (Emanuel Lutheran Church) in the old church, Warren Roos, a former railroader, answered questions about the old green caboose. Little ones especially found the caboose fun to climb in. Tom Ahrens demonstrated making apple juice by running fresh apples through a juicer. Lots of little ones volunteered to help Tom turn the handle.

Jeannie Gore Lesmeister had her spinning wheel and articles she had crocheted from different fibers. Among the many items there was a baby bonnet made from her rabbit’s fur and another shawl from a goat’s fur and a hat from dog fur. Vicki Kotschwar and Alice Serres called the school to order and showed some things about going to school in the little country school.

Sheris Dojcsany milked her pet goat and served glasses of chilled goat’s milk. It was rich but good. Judy Pinkerton made and distributed bags of popcorn which were enjoyed by all. Sharla Maginnis performed her rope demonstration. Beth Gibbons demonstrated sewing on an ancient 1870 New Home Sewing Machine. A little girl gratefully accepted the dolly blanket that was made.

“The Music Makers” of Chadron, Hay Springs and Rushville, did an outstanding job entertaining. Harmonica player, Ivan Hinman, wore his cowboy chaps that he said were worn in a tour in England many years ago. The chaps have the brand V- on the side. He also carried his cowboy rope. Arlene Masek played a washboard, as did Doris McKillip and Mary Morris. Dennis McKillip played the guitar and Bertha Landreth played her accordion while her daughter Bee played the guitar. They were good without knowing any music notes. Arlene said they play by ear. There was also some great music by a vocal duet of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Cunningham of Chadron accompanied by his guitar.

Brian Roberts took guests on hay rides around the area. Roger Wess demonstrated the corn sheller. Judy Hawthorne offered samples of different jellies on crackers. Onion jelly? She recommended it with meats.

Lila Ahrens, Shirley Ahrens, Evelyn Reed, Warren Ross and others took turns trying to coax butter from the cream. Fresh butter on home made biscuits was a real treat to many guests of the day. Some came back time after time. Little ones stood around and asked, “What are they doing?”

Some visitors and performers dressed in cowboy hats and chaps while their ladies wore long dresses. Anyone wishing to visit the museum during the winter months/after hours or for questions, contact Belle Lecher at (308) 432-2309.

A crowd of at least 440 interested people signed the guest book at the 13th annual History in Action Day at the Dawes County Museum on a perfect 90 degree day. Tom Serres said, “We bettered our attendance record from last year.”

Guests of all ages attended from a two month old baby on up. Many visitors took the time to stroll through the museum to see the many exhibits and research books that are available free to the public to use. All workers at this well-kept free museum are volunteers.

History Day Organizer Chairman, Tom Serres, invited demonstrators to show their talents and offerings to the public. Mary Vetter came wearing her decorated Native American dress she had made. Ron Weinteer was around to help where needed. Belle Lecher, wearing a long dress and matching bonnet she made, was everywhere asking questions and making herself available to help. Doctor Gamby did wheat grinding demonstrations south of the buildings.

There were tractor hay rides, a horse hay ride, a church choir (Emanuel Lutheran Church) in the old church, Warren Roos, a former railroader, answered questions about the old green caboose. Little ones especially found the caboose fun to climb in. Tom Ahrens demonstrated making apple juice by running fresh apples through a juicer. Lots of little ones volunteered to help Tom turn the handle.

Jeannie Gore Lesmeister had her spinning wheel and articles she had crocheted from different fibers. Among the many items there was a baby bonnet made from her rabbit’s fur and another shawl from a goat’s fur and a hat from dog fur. Vicki Kotschwar and Alice Serres called the school to order and showed some things about going to school in the little country school.

Sheris Dojcsany milked her pet goat and served glasses of chilled goat’s milk. It was rich but good. Judy Pinkerton made and distributed bags of popcorn which were enjoyed by all. Sharla Maginnis performed her rope demonstration. Beth Gibbons demonstrated sewing on an ancient 1870 New Home Sewing Machine. A little girl gratefully accepted the dolly blanket that was made.

“The Music Makers” of Chadron, Hay Springs and Rushville, did an outstanding job entertaining. Harmonica player, Ivan Hinman, wore his cowboy chaps that he said were worn in a tour in England many years ago. The chaps have the brand V- on the side. He also carried his cowboy rope. Arlene Masek played a washboard, as did Doris McKillip and Mary Morris. Dennis McKillip played the guitar and Bertha Landreth played her accordion while her daughter Bee played the guitar. They were good without knowing any music notes. Arlene said they play by ear. There was also some great music by a vocal duet of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Cunningham of Chadron accompanied by his guitar.

Brian Roberts took guests on hay rides around the area. Roger Wess demonstrated the corn sheller. Judy Hawthorne offered samples of different jellies on crackers. Onion jelly? She recommended it with meats.

Lila Ahrens, Shirley Ahrens, Evelyn Reed, Warren Ross and others took turns trying to coax butter from the cream. Fresh butter on home made biscuits was a real treat to many guests of the day. Some came back time after time. Little ones stood around and asked, “What are they doing?”

Some visitors and performers dressed in cowboy hats and chaps while their ladies wore long dresses. Anyone wishing to visit the museum during the winter months/after hours or for questions, contact Belle Lecher at (308) 432-2309.

A crowd of at least 440 interested people signed the guest book at the 13th annual History in Action Day at the Dawes County Museum on a perfect 90 degree day. Tom Serres said, “We bettered our attendance record from last year.”

Guests of all ages attended from a two month old baby on up. Many visitors took the time to stroll through the museum to see the many exhibits and research books that are available free to the public to use. All workers at this well-kept free museum are volunteers.

History Day Organizer Chairman, Tom Serres, invited demonstrators to show their talents and offerings to the public. Mary Vetter came wearing her decorated Native American dress she had made. Ron Weinteer was around to help where needed. Belle Lecher, wearing a long dress and matching bonnet she made, was everywhere asking questions and making herself available to help. Doctor Gamby did wheat grinding demonstrations south of the buildings.

There were tractor hay rides, a horse hay ride, a church choir (Emanuel Lutheran Church) in the old church, Warren Roos, a former railroader, answered questions about the old green caboose. Little ones especially found the caboose fun to climb in. Tom Ahrens demonstrated making apple juice by running fresh apples through a juicer. Lots of little ones volunteered to help Tom turn the handle.

Jeannie Gore Lesmeister had her spinning wheel and articles she had crocheted from different fibers. Among the many items there was a baby bonnet made from her rabbit’s fur and another shawl from a goat’s fur and a hat from dog fur. Vicki Kotschwar and Alice Serres called the school to order and showed some things about going to school in the little country school.

Sheris Dojcsany milked her pet goat and served glasses of chilled goat’s milk. It was rich but good. Judy Pinkerton made and distributed bags of popcorn which were enjoyed by all. Sharla Maginnis performed her rope demonstration. Beth Gibbons demonstrated sewing on an ancient 1870 New Home Sewing Machine. A little girl gratefully accepted the dolly blanket that was made.

“The Music Makers” of Chadron, Hay Springs and Rushville, did an outstanding job entertaining. Harmonica player, Ivan Hinman, wore his cowboy chaps that he said were worn in a tour in England many years ago. The chaps have the brand V- on the side. He also carried his cowboy rope. Arlene Masek played a washboard, as did Doris McKillip and Mary Morris. Dennis McKillip played the guitar and Bertha Landreth played her accordion while her daughter Bee played the guitar. They were good without knowing any music notes. Arlene said they play by ear. There was also some great music by a vocal duet of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Cunningham of Chadron accompanied by his guitar.

Brian Roberts took guests on hay rides around the area. Roger Wess demonstrated the corn sheller. Judy Hawthorne offered samples of different jellies on crackers. Onion jelly? She recommended it with meats.

Lila Ahrens, Shirley Ahrens, Evelyn Reed, Warren Ross and others took turns trying to coax butter from the cream. Fresh butter on home made biscuits was a real treat to many guests of the day. Some came back time after time. Little ones stood around and asked, “What are they doing?”

Some visitors and performers dressed in cowboy hats and chaps while their ladies wore long dresses. Anyone wishing to visit the museum during the winter months/after hours or for questions, contact Belle Lecher at (308) 432-2309.


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