Delta County Fair treasures traditions | TheFencePost.com

Delta County Fair treasures traditions

Robyn Scherer, M.Agr.
Ft. Collins, Colo.

Robyn SchererKaitlyn Sharpe of Delta, Colo., parades her grand champion goat in the sales ring for the Junior Market Livestock Sale.

The Delta County Fair, held in Hotchkiss, Colo., is one of the biggest events each year. This year’s theme was “Treasuring the Tradition,” and community members traveled to the fairgrounds to watch students show livestock, cheer during the evening events, and enjoy family time.

This year’s fair offered a full range of livestock shows, horse shows, rodeos, a demolition derby, a carnival, a Junior Market Livestock Sale, photography and vegetable competition and a community barbeque.

The livestock auction, held on Saturday, August 13, brought in more money per kid this year, even though the total number of animals was down. There were 214 animals sold, down from 270, for a total of $231,675. The beef averaged $2,258.85 per head, hogs were $1,017.14 per head, lambs were $823.33 per head and goats were $482.86 per head. Chickens averaged $244.50 per pen of three, turkeys averaged $396.88 per pair and rabbits averaged $333.33 per pen of three.

The Grand Champion steer, exhibited by Kasey Miles of the Saddle Mountain 4-H club, was purchased by Delta Hardware. The champion lamb was exhibited by Shane Anderson of the Valley View Showman and was purchased by Wells Fargo Bank and Producers Co-op.

The Grand Champion swine was shown by Colby Wilson of the Bell Creek Buckaroos 4-H club, and was bought by Delta County Federal Credit Union. The champion goat, exhibited by Kaitlyn Sharpe, was purchased by JC Propane.

At the beginning of the CPRA rodeo on Saturday evening, past royalty members Queen Amy Craddock, Princess Kendra TenNapel and Junior Princess Morgan Dillingham handed off their titles to the new royalty: Lindsey Todd as Queen, Arla Nelson as Princess, and Tess Gore as Junior Princess.

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Hard hits, smoke and banged up cars defined the Demolition Derby, held on Thursday, August 11. The sold out crowd and ideal conditions produced the best demo derby in several years. Chris Fox of Grand Junction, Colo., came home with the top prize, followed by Jerod Graff.

Fox grew up in an auto garage, and has always had a passion for cars. His father and brothers all work in the automotive industry, and his dad and uncle both competed in demo derbies. The 2009 demo derby champion, it’s in his blood.

Fox’s car, nicknamed “Shark Attack,” brandished a large, blue stuffed shark on the roof of the car, which has come to define him and is his tradition. Even though the car changes, the shark remains.

“We’ve had that shark from the beginning, when I started seven years ago. It was brought back from Orlando by our kid’s grandparents, when our daughter was a baby. We decided to put the shark on the car so that the kids would know which car daddy was driving,” Chris Fox said.

Even though the kids are now old enough to tell the cars apart, Fox still secures the shark to the roof for every competition. “It’s kind of tradition now. The poor thing has had to be restitched and restuffed, but it’s held up,” he said.

The shark is not the only part of the car that took a beating. His car was put through three sections with little time for work between heats.

Fox competed back-to-back-to-back, because he got stuck on another car in his heat, the third heat, which prevented him from advancing straight to the A main final. Instead, he was forced to go to the B main final to fight for one of the two remaining spots in the A final.

In the first final, he was able to take his Shark Attack car and place in the top two, which allowed him to move on to the A main final. Fox had roughly 20 minutes between each section to fix up his car and get it running the best he could. Between the B final and A final, however, he went over, and was late to the A final.

This gave him a three-minute penalty, where other cars were allowed to hit him, but he could not move.

“I couldn’t believe people didn’t hit me more than they did. I got lucky,” said Fox.

After the penalty was over, Fox could then get to business. “There is a lot of strategy involved. You want to take your time and plan your hits, but when the adrenaline gets flowing you get tunnel vision and you just want to hit everyone. It’s hard to hold back,” he said.

This discipline allowed Fox to outlast seven other drivers in the A main, and 16 other drivers total, and take home a little over $1,000, and two trophies for winning both finals. The car was donated by Dave’s Auto Salvage, and was sponsored by Fox’s Garage, Vanguard Autorecycling and Guardian Interlock.

Fox attributes his success in demo derbies to his family and crew. “For us, this is a family event. We own Fox’s Garage in Grand Junction, and everyone helps to put together the car. It usually takes us 30-40 hours beforehand, and then we have a crew of five to 10 people at each derby that kept keep the car running,” he said.

“My kids always come to watch, and this year they painted the car. We do this for fun, so it’s great that everyone can be a part of it.”

“The work that is involved beforehand is pretty important,” said Sherie Fox, Chris’s wife. “They have to go in and strip everything out, including the glass. They have to weld the doors on, and install all the safety precautions they are allowed to. There is a lot of welding and chaining involved.”

When asked by his children if they could use the shark again next year, he replied, “Of course we can. If that’s what you want.” He then scooped up his kids, and rejoined his family as they loaded up the car to head home.

The Delta County Fair, held in Hotchkiss, Colo., is one of the biggest events each year. This year’s theme was “Treasuring the Tradition,” and community members traveled to the fairgrounds to watch students show livestock, cheer during the evening events, and enjoy family time.

This year’s fair offered a full range of livestock shows, horse shows, rodeos, a demolition derby, a carnival, a Junior Market Livestock Sale, photography and vegetable competition and a community barbeque.

The livestock auction, held on Saturday, August 13, brought in more money per kid this year, even though the total number of animals was down. There were 214 animals sold, down from 270, for a total of $231,675. The beef averaged $2,258.85 per head, hogs were $1,017.14 per head, lambs were $823.33 per head and goats were $482.86 per head. Chickens averaged $244.50 per pen of three, turkeys averaged $396.88 per pair and rabbits averaged $333.33 per pen of three.

The Grand Champion steer, exhibited by Kasey Miles of the Saddle Mountain 4-H club, was purchased by Delta Hardware. The champion lamb was exhibited by Shane Anderson of the Valley View Showman and was purchased by Wells Fargo Bank and Producers Co-op.

The Grand Champion swine was shown by Colby Wilson of the Bell Creek Buckaroos 4-H club, and was bought by Delta County Federal Credit Union. The champion goat, exhibited by Kaitlyn Sharpe, was purchased by JC Propane.

At the beginning of the CPRA rodeo on Saturday evening, past royalty members Queen Amy Craddock, Princess Kendra TenNapel and Junior Princess Morgan Dillingham handed off their titles to the new royalty: Lindsey Todd as Queen, Arla Nelson as Princess, and Tess Gore as Junior Princess.

Hard hits, smoke and banged up cars defined the Demolition Derby, held on Thursday, August 11. The sold out crowd and ideal conditions produced the best demo derby in several years. Chris Fox of Grand Junction, Colo., came home with the top prize, followed by Jerod Graff.

Fox grew up in an auto garage, and has always had a passion for cars. His father and brothers all work in the automotive industry, and his dad and uncle both competed in demo derbies. The 2009 demo derby champion, it’s in his blood.

Fox’s car, nicknamed “Shark Attack,” brandished a large, blue stuffed shark on the roof of the car, which has come to define him and is his tradition. Even though the car changes, the shark remains.

“We’ve had that shark from the beginning, when I started seven years ago. It was brought back from Orlando by our kid’s grandparents, when our daughter was a baby. We decided to put the shark on the car so that the kids would know which car daddy was driving,” Chris Fox said.

Even though the kids are now old enough to tell the cars apart, Fox still secures the shark to the roof for every competition. “It’s kind of tradition now. The poor thing has had to be restitched and restuffed, but it’s held up,” he said.

The shark is not the only part of the car that took a beating. His car was put through three sections with little time for work between heats.

Fox competed back-to-back-to-back, because he got stuck on another car in his heat, the third heat, which prevented him from advancing straight to the A main final. Instead, he was forced to go to the B main final to fight for one of the two remaining spots in the A final.

In the first final, he was able to take his Shark Attack car and place in the top two, which allowed him to move on to the A main final. Fox had roughly 20 minutes between each section to fix up his car and get it running the best he could. Between the B final and A final, however, he went over, and was late to the A final.

This gave him a three-minute penalty, where other cars were allowed to hit him, but he could not move.

“I couldn’t believe people didn’t hit me more than they did. I got lucky,” said Fox.

After the penalty was over, Fox could then get to business. “There is a lot of strategy involved. You want to take your time and plan your hits, but when the adrenaline gets flowing you get tunnel vision and you just want to hit everyone. It’s hard to hold back,” he said.

This discipline allowed Fox to outlast seven other drivers in the A main, and 16 other drivers total, and take home a little over $1,000, and two trophies for winning both finals. The car was donated by Dave’s Auto Salvage, and was sponsored by Fox’s Garage, Vanguard Autorecycling and Guardian Interlock.

Fox attributes his success in demo derbies to his family and crew. “For us, this is a family event. We own Fox’s Garage in Grand Junction, and everyone helps to put together the car. It usually takes us 30-40 hours beforehand, and then we have a crew of five to 10 people at each derby that kept keep the car running,” he said.

“My kids always come to watch, and this year they painted the car. We do this for fun, so it’s great that everyone can be a part of it.”

“The work that is involved beforehand is pretty important,” said Sherie Fox, Chris’s wife. “They have to go in and strip everything out, including the glass. They have to weld the doors on, and install all the safety precautions they are allowed to. There is a lot of welding and chaining involved.”

When asked by his children if they could use the shark again next year, he replied, “Of course we can. If that’s what you want.” He then scooped up his kids, and rejoined his family as they loaded up the car to head home.

The Delta County Fair, held in Hotchkiss, Colo., is one of the biggest events each year. This year’s theme was “Treasuring the Tradition,” and community members traveled to the fairgrounds to watch students show livestock, cheer during the evening events, and enjoy family time.

This year’s fair offered a full range of livestock shows, horse shows, rodeos, a demolition derby, a carnival, a Junior Market Livestock Sale, photography and vegetable competition and a community barbeque.

The livestock auction, held on Saturday, August 13, brought in more money per kid this year, even though the total number of animals was down. There were 214 animals sold, down from 270, for a total of $231,675. The beef averaged $2,258.85 per head, hogs were $1,017.14 per head, lambs were $823.33 per head and goats were $482.86 per head. Chickens averaged $244.50 per pen of three, turkeys averaged $396.88 per pair and rabbits averaged $333.33 per pen of three.

The Grand Champion steer, exhibited by Kasey Miles of the Saddle Mountain 4-H club, was purchased by Delta Hardware. The champion lamb was exhibited by Shane Anderson of the Valley View Showman and was purchased by Wells Fargo Bank and Producers Co-op.

The Grand Champion swine was shown by Colby Wilson of the Bell Creek Buckaroos 4-H club, and was bought by Delta County Federal Credit Union. The champion goat, exhibited by Kaitlyn Sharpe, was purchased by JC Propane.

At the beginning of the CPRA rodeo on Saturday evening, past royalty members Queen Amy Craddock, Princess Kendra TenNapel and Junior Princess Morgan Dillingham handed off their titles to the new royalty: Lindsey Todd as Queen, Arla Nelson as Princess, and Tess Gore as Junior Princess.

Hard hits, smoke and banged up cars defined the Demolition Derby, held on Thursday, August 11. The sold out crowd and ideal conditions produced the best demo derby in several years. Chris Fox of Grand Junction, Colo., came home with the top prize, followed by Jerod Graff.

Fox grew up in an auto garage, and has always had a passion for cars. His father and brothers all work in the automotive industry, and his dad and uncle both competed in demo derbies. The 2009 demo derby champion, it’s in his blood.

Fox’s car, nicknamed “Shark Attack,” brandished a large, blue stuffed shark on the roof of the car, which has come to define him and is his tradition. Even though the car changes, the shark remains.

“We’ve had that shark from the beginning, when I started seven years ago. It was brought back from Orlando by our kid’s grandparents, when our daughter was a baby. We decided to put the shark on the car so that the kids would know which car daddy was driving,” Chris Fox said.

Even though the kids are now old enough to tell the cars apart, Fox still secures the shark to the roof for every competition. “It’s kind of tradition now. The poor thing has had to be restitched and restuffed, but it’s held up,” he said.

The shark is not the only part of the car that took a beating. His car was put through three sections with little time for work between heats.

Fox competed back-to-back-to-back, because he got stuck on another car in his heat, the third heat, which prevented him from advancing straight to the A main final. Instead, he was forced to go to the B main final to fight for one of the two remaining spots in the A final.

In the first final, he was able to take his Shark Attack car and place in the top two, which allowed him to move on to the A main final. Fox had roughly 20 minutes between each section to fix up his car and get it running the best he could. Between the B final and A final, however, he went over, and was late to the A final.

This gave him a three-minute penalty, where other cars were allowed to hit him, but he could not move.

“I couldn’t believe people didn’t hit me more than they did. I got lucky,” said Fox.

After the penalty was over, Fox could then get to business. “There is a lot of strategy involved. You want to take your time and plan your hits, but when the adrenaline gets flowing you get tunnel vision and you just want to hit everyone. It’s hard to hold back,” he said.

This discipline allowed Fox to outlast seven other drivers in the A main, and 16 other drivers total, and take home a little over $1,000, and two trophies for winning both finals. The car was donated by Dave’s Auto Salvage, and was sponsored by Fox’s Garage, Vanguard Autorecycling and Guardian Interlock.

Fox attributes his success in demo derbies to his family and crew. “For us, this is a family event. We own Fox’s Garage in Grand Junction, and everyone helps to put together the car. It usually takes us 30-40 hours beforehand, and then we have a crew of five to 10 people at each derby that kept keep the car running,” he said.

“My kids always come to watch, and this year they painted the car. We do this for fun, so it’s great that everyone can be a part of it.”

“The work that is involved beforehand is pretty important,” said Sherie Fox, Chris’s wife. “They have to go in and strip everything out, including the glass. They have to weld the doors on, and install all the safety precautions they are allowed to. There is a lot of welding and chaining involved.”

When asked by his children if they could use the shark again next year, he replied, “Of course we can. If that’s what you want.” He then scooped up his kids, and rejoined his family as they loaded up the car to head home.

The Delta County Fair, held in Hotchkiss, Colo., is one of the biggest events each year. This year’s theme was “Treasuring the Tradition,” and community members traveled to the fairgrounds to watch students show livestock, cheer during the evening events, and enjoy family time.

This year’s fair offered a full range of livestock shows, horse shows, rodeos, a demolition derby, a carnival, a Junior Market Livestock Sale, photography and vegetable competition and a community barbeque.

The livestock auction, held on Saturday, August 13, brought in more money per kid this year, even though the total number of animals was down. There were 214 animals sold, down from 270, for a total of $231,675. The beef averaged $2,258.85 per head, hogs were $1,017.14 per head, lambs were $823.33 per head and goats were $482.86 per head. Chickens averaged $244.50 per pen of three, turkeys averaged $396.88 per pair and rabbits averaged $333.33 per pen of three.

The Grand Champion steer, exhibited by Kasey Miles of the Saddle Mountain 4-H club, was purchased by Delta Hardware. The champion lamb was exhibited by Shane Anderson of the Valley View Showman and was purchased by Wells Fargo Bank and Producers Co-op.

The Grand Champion swine was shown by Colby Wilson of the Bell Creek Buckaroos 4-H club, and was bought by Delta County Federal Credit Union. The champion goat, exhibited by Kaitlyn Sharpe, was purchased by JC Propane.

At the beginning of the CPRA rodeo on Saturday evening, past royalty members Queen Amy Craddock, Princess Kendra TenNapel and Junior Princess Morgan Dillingham handed off their titles to the new royalty: Lindsey Todd as Queen, Arla Nelson as Princess, and Tess Gore as Junior Princess.

Hard hits, smoke and banged up cars defined the Demolition Derby, held on Thursday, August 11. The sold out crowd and ideal conditions produced the best demo derby in several years. Chris Fox of Grand Junction, Colo., came home with the top prize, followed by Jerod Graff.

Fox grew up in an auto garage, and has always had a passion for cars. His father and brothers all work in the automotive industry, and his dad and uncle both competed in demo derbies. The 2009 demo derby champion, it’s in his blood.

Fox’s car, nicknamed “Shark Attack,” brandished a large, blue stuffed shark on the roof of the car, which has come to define him and is his tradition. Even though the car changes, the shark remains.

“We’ve had that shark from the beginning, when I started seven years ago. It was brought back from Orlando by our kid’s grandparents, when our daughter was a baby. We decided to put the shark on the car so that the kids would know which car daddy was driving,” Chris Fox said.

Even though the kids are now old enough to tell the cars apart, Fox still secures the shark to the roof for every competition. “It’s kind of tradition now. The poor thing has had to be restitched and restuffed, but it’s held up,” he said.

The shark is not the only part of the car that took a beating. His car was put through three sections with little time for work between heats.

Fox competed back-to-back-to-back, because he got stuck on another car in his heat, the third heat, which prevented him from advancing straight to the A main final. Instead, he was forced to go to the B main final to fight for one of the two remaining spots in the A final.

In the first final, he was able to take his Shark Attack car and place in the top two, which allowed him to move on to the A main final. Fox had roughly 20 minutes between each section to fix up his car and get it running the best he could. Between the B final and A final, however, he went over, and was late to the A final.

This gave him a three-minute penalty, where other cars were allowed to hit him, but he could not move.

“I couldn’t believe people didn’t hit me more than they did. I got lucky,” said Fox.

After the penalty was over, Fox could then get to business. “There is a lot of strategy involved. You want to take your time and plan your hits, but when the adrenaline gets flowing you get tunnel vision and you just want to hit everyone. It’s hard to hold back,” he said.

This discipline allowed Fox to outlast seven other drivers in the A main, and 16 other drivers total, and take home a little over $1,000, and two trophies for winning both finals. The car was donated by Dave’s Auto Salvage, and was sponsored by Fox’s Garage, Vanguard Autorecycling and Guardian Interlock.

Fox attributes his success in demo derbies to his family and crew. “For us, this is a family event. We own Fox’s Garage in Grand Junction, and everyone helps to put together the car. It usually takes us 30-40 hours beforehand, and then we have a crew of five to 10 people at each derby that kept keep the car running,” he said.

“My kids always come to watch, and this year they painted the car. We do this for fun, so it’s great that everyone can be a part of it.”

“The work that is involved beforehand is pretty important,” said Sherie Fox, Chris’s wife. “They have to go in and strip everything out, including the glass. They have to weld the doors on, and install all the safety precautions they are allowed to. There is a lot of welding and chaining involved.”

When asked by his children if they could use the shark again next year, he replied, “Of course we can. If that’s what you want.” He then scooped up his kids, and rejoined his family as they loaded up the car to head home.

The Delta County Fair, held in Hotchkiss, Colo., is one of the biggest events each year. This year’s theme was “Treasuring the Tradition,” and community members traveled to the fairgrounds to watch students show livestock, cheer during the evening events, and enjoy family time.

This year’s fair offered a full range of livestock shows, horse shows, rodeos, a demolition derby, a carnival, a Junior Market Livestock Sale, photography and vegetable competition and a community barbeque.

The livestock auction, held on Saturday, August 13, brought in more money per kid this year, even though the total number of animals was down. There were 214 animals sold, down from 270, for a total of $231,675. The beef averaged $2,258.85 per head, hogs were $1,017.14 per head, lambs were $823.33 per head and goats were $482.86 per head. Chickens averaged $244.50 per pen of three, turkeys averaged $396.88 per pair and rabbits averaged $333.33 per pen of three.

The Grand Champion steer, exhibited by Kasey Miles of the Saddle Mountain 4-H club, was purchased by Delta Hardware. The champion lamb was exhibited by Shane Anderson of the Valley View Showman and was purchased by Wells Fargo Bank and Producers Co-op.

The Grand Champion swine was shown by Colby Wilson of the Bell Creek Buckaroos 4-H club, and was bought by Delta County Federal Credit Union. The champion goat, exhibited by Kaitlyn Sharpe, was purchased by JC Propane.

At the beginning of the CPRA rodeo on Saturday evening, past royalty members Queen Amy Craddock, Princess Kendra TenNapel and Junior Princess Morgan Dillingham handed off their titles to the new royalty: Lindsey Todd as Queen, Arla Nelson as Princess, and Tess Gore as Junior Princess.

Hard hits, smoke and banged up cars defined the Demolition Derby, held on Thursday, August 11. The sold out crowd and ideal conditions produced the best demo derby in several years. Chris Fox of Grand Junction, Colo., came home with the top prize, followed by Jerod Graff.

Fox grew up in an auto garage, and has always had a passion for cars. His father and brothers all work in the automotive industry, and his dad and uncle both competed in demo derbies. The 2009 demo derby champion, it’s in his blood.

Fox’s car, nicknamed “Shark Attack,” brandished a large, blue stuffed shark on the roof of the car, which has come to define him and is his tradition. Even though the car changes, the shark remains.

“We’ve had that shark from the beginning, when I started seven years ago. It was brought back from Orlando by our kid’s grandparents, when our daughter was a baby. We decided to put the shark on the car so that the kids would know which car daddy was driving,” Chris Fox said.

Even though the kids are now old enough to tell the cars apart, Fox still secures the shark to the roof for every competition. “It’s kind of tradition now. The poor thing has had to be restitched and restuffed, but it’s held up,” he said.

The shark is not the only part of the car that took a beating. His car was put through three sections with little time for work between heats.

Fox competed back-to-back-to-back, because he got stuck on another car in his heat, the third heat, which prevented him from advancing straight to the A main final. Instead, he was forced to go to the B main final to fight for one of the two remaining spots in the A final.

In the first final, he was able to take his Shark Attack car and place in the top two, which allowed him to move on to the A main final. Fox had roughly 20 minutes between each section to fix up his car and get it running the best he could. Between the B final and A final, however, he went over, and was late to the A final.

This gave him a three-minute penalty, where other cars were allowed to hit him, but he could not move.

“I couldn’t believe people didn’t hit me more than they did. I got lucky,” said Fox.

After the penalty was over, Fox could then get to business. “There is a lot of strategy involved. You want to take your time and plan your hits, but when the adrenaline gets flowing you get tunnel vision and you just want to hit everyone. It’s hard to hold back,” he said.

This discipline allowed Fox to outlast seven other drivers in the A main, and 16 other drivers total, and take home a little over $1,000, and two trophies for winning both finals. The car was donated by Dave’s Auto Salvage, and was sponsored by Fox’s Garage, Vanguard Autorecycling and Guardian Interlock.

Fox attributes his success in demo derbies to his family and crew. “For us, this is a family event. We own Fox’s Garage in Grand Junction, and everyone helps to put together the car. It usually takes us 30-40 hours beforehand, and then we have a crew of five to 10 people at each derby that kept keep the car running,” he said.

“My kids always come to watch, and this year they painted the car. We do this for fun, so it’s great that everyone can be a part of it.”

“The work that is involved beforehand is pretty important,” said Sherie Fox, Chris’s wife. “They have to go in and strip everything out, including the glass. They have to weld the doors on, and install all the safety precautions they are allowed to. There is a lot of welding and chaining involved.”

When asked by his children if they could use the shark again next year, he replied, “Of course we can. If that’s what you want.” He then scooped up his kids, and rejoined his family as they loaded up the car to head home.

The Delta County Fair, held in Hotchkiss, Colo., is one of the biggest events each year. This year’s theme was “Treasuring the Tradition,” and community members traveled to the fairgrounds to watch students show livestock, cheer during the evening events, and enjoy family time.

This year’s fair offered a full range of livestock shows, horse shows, rodeos, a demolition derby, a carnival, a Junior Market Livestock Sale, photography and vegetable competition and a community barbeque.

The livestock auction, held on Saturday, August 13, brought in more money per kid this year, even though the total number of animals was down. There were 214 animals sold, down from 270, for a total of $231,675. The beef averaged $2,258.85 per head, hogs were $1,017.14 per head, lambs were $823.33 per head and goats were $482.86 per head. Chickens averaged $244.50 per pen of three, turkeys averaged $396.88 per pair and rabbits averaged $333.33 per pen of three.

The Grand Champion steer, exhibited by Kasey Miles of the Saddle Mountain 4-H club, was purchased by Delta Hardware. The champion lamb was exhibited by Shane Anderson of the Valley View Showman and was purchased by Wells Fargo Bank and Producers Co-op.

The Grand Champion swine was shown by Colby Wilson of the Bell Creek Buckaroos 4-H club, and was bought by Delta County Federal Credit Union. The champion goat, exhibited by Kaitlyn Sharpe, was purchased by JC Propane.

At the beginning of the CPRA rodeo on Saturday evening, past royalty members Queen Amy Craddock, Princess Kendra TenNapel and Junior Princess Morgan Dillingham handed off their titles to the new royalty: Lindsey Todd as Queen, Arla Nelson as Princess, and Tess Gore as Junior Princess.

Hard hits, smoke and banged up cars defined the Demolition Derby, held on Thursday, August 11. The sold out crowd and ideal conditions produced the best demo derby in several years. Chris Fox of Grand Junction, Colo., came home with the top prize, followed by Jerod Graff.

Fox grew up in an auto garage, and has always had a passion for cars. His father and brothers all work in the automotive industry, and his dad and uncle both competed in demo derbies. The 2009 demo derby champion, it’s in his blood.

Fox’s car, nicknamed “Shark Attack,” brandished a large, blue stuffed shark on the roof of the car, which has come to define him and is his tradition. Even though the car changes, the shark remains.

“We’ve had that shark from the beginning, when I started seven years ago. It was brought back from Orlando by our kid’s grandparents, when our daughter was a baby. We decided to put the shark on the car so that the kids would know which car daddy was driving,” Chris Fox said.

Even though the kids are now old enough to tell the cars apart, Fox still secures the shark to the roof for every competition. “It’s kind of tradition now. The poor thing has had to be restitched and restuffed, but it’s held up,” he said.

The shark is not the only part of the car that took a beating. His car was put through three sections with little time for work between heats.

Fox competed back-to-back-to-back, because he got stuck on another car in his heat, the third heat, which prevented him from advancing straight to the A main final. Instead, he was forced to go to the B main final to fight for one of the two remaining spots in the A final.

In the first final, he was able to take his Shark Attack car and place in the top two, which allowed him to move on to the A main final. Fox had roughly 20 minutes between each section to fix up his car and get it running the best he could. Between the B final and A final, however, he went over, and was late to the A final.

This gave him a three-minute penalty, where other cars were allowed to hit him, but he could not move.

“I couldn’t believe people didn’t hit me more than they did. I got lucky,” said Fox.

After the penalty was over, Fox could then get to business. “There is a lot of strategy involved. You want to take your time and plan your hits, but when the adrenaline gets flowing you get tunnel vision and you just want to hit everyone. It’s hard to hold back,” he said.

This discipline allowed Fox to outlast seven other drivers in the A main, and 16 other drivers total, and take home a little over $1,000, and two trophies for winning both finals. The car was donated by Dave’s Auto Salvage, and was sponsored by Fox’s Garage, Vanguard Autorecycling and Guardian Interlock.

Fox attributes his success in demo derbies to his family and crew. “For us, this is a family event. We own Fox’s Garage in Grand Junction, and everyone helps to put together the car. It usually takes us 30-40 hours beforehand, and then we have a crew of five to 10 people at each derby that kept keep the car running,” he said.

“My kids always come to watch, and this year they painted the car. We do this for fun, so it’s great that everyone can be a part of it.”

“The work that is involved beforehand is pretty important,” said Sherie Fox, Chris’s wife. “They have to go in and strip everything out, including the glass. They have to weld the doors on, and install all the safety precautions they are allowed to. There is a lot of welding and chaining involved.”

When asked by his children if they could use the shark again next year, he replied, “Of course we can. If that’s what you want.” He then scooped up his kids, and rejoined his family as they loaded up the car to head home.

The Delta County Fair, held in Hotchkiss, Colo., is one of the biggest events each year. This year’s theme was “Treasuring the Tradition,” and community members traveled to the fairgrounds to watch students show livestock, cheer during the evening events, and enjoy family time.

This year’s fair offered a full range of livestock shows, horse shows, rodeos, a demolition derby, a carnival, a Junior Market Livestock Sale, photography and vegetable competition and a community barbeque.

The livestock auction, held on Saturday, August 13, brought in more money per kid this year, even though the total number of animals was down. There were 214 animals sold, down from 270, for a total of $231,675. The beef averaged $2,258.85 per head, hogs were $1,017.14 per head, lambs were $823.33 per head and goats were $482.86 per head. Chickens averaged $244.50 per pen of three, turkeys averaged $396.88 per pair and rabbits averaged $333.33 per pen of three.

The Grand Champion steer, exhibited by Kasey Miles of the Saddle Mountain 4-H club, was purchased by Delta Hardware. The champion lamb was exhibited by Shane Anderson of the Valley View Showman and was purchased by Wells Fargo Bank and Producers Co-op.

The Grand Champion swine was shown by Colby Wilson of the Bell Creek Buckaroos 4-H club, and was bought by Delta County Federal Credit Union. The champion goat, exhibited by Kaitlyn Sharpe, was purchased by JC Propane.

At the beginning of the CPRA rodeo on Saturday evening, past royalty members Queen Amy Craddock, Princess Kendra TenNapel and Junior Princess Morgan Dillingham handed off their titles to the new royalty: Lindsey Todd as Queen, Arla Nelson as Princess, and Tess Gore as Junior Princess.

Hard hits, smoke and banged up cars defined the Demolition Derby, held on Thursday, August 11. The sold out crowd and ideal conditions produced the best demo derby in several years. Chris Fox of Grand Junction, Colo., came home with the top prize, followed by Jerod Graff.

Fox grew up in an auto garage, and has always had a passion for cars. His father and brothers all work in the automotive industry, and his dad and uncle both competed in demo derbies. The 2009 demo derby champion, it’s in his blood.

Fox’s car, nicknamed “Shark Attack,” brandished a large, blue stuffed shark on the roof of the car, which has come to define him and is his tradition. Even though the car changes, the shark remains.

“We’ve had that shark from the beginning, when I started seven years ago. It was brought back from Orlando by our kid’s grandparents, when our daughter was a baby. We decided to put the shark on the car so that the kids would know which car daddy was driving,” Chris Fox said.

Even though the kids are now old enough to tell the cars apart, Fox still secures the shark to the roof for every competition. “It’s kind of tradition now. The poor thing has had to be restitched and restuffed, but it’s held up,” he said.

The shark is not the only part of the car that took a beating. His car was put through three sections with little time for work between heats.

Fox competed back-to-back-to-back, because he got stuck on another car in his heat, the third heat, which prevented him from advancing straight to the A main final. Instead, he was forced to go to the B main final to fight for one of the two remaining spots in the A final.

In the first final, he was able to take his Shark Attack car and place in the top two, which allowed him to move on to the A main final. Fox had roughly 20 minutes between each section to fix up his car and get it running the best he could. Between the B final and A final, however, he went over, and was late to the A final.

This gave him a three-minute penalty, where other cars were allowed to hit him, but he could not move.

“I couldn’t believe people didn’t hit me more than they did. I got lucky,” said Fox.

After the penalty was over, Fox could then get to business. “There is a lot of strategy involved. You want to take your time and plan your hits, but when the adrenaline gets flowing you get tunnel vision and you just want to hit everyone. It’s hard to hold back,” he said.

This discipline allowed Fox to outlast seven other drivers in the A main, and 16 other drivers total, and take home a little over $1,000, and two trophies for winning both finals. The car was donated by Dave’s Auto Salvage, and was sponsored by Fox’s Garage, Vanguard Autorecycling and Guardian Interlock.

Fox attributes his success in demo derbies to his family and crew. “For us, this is a family event. We own Fox’s Garage in Grand Junction, and everyone helps to put together the car. It usually takes us 30-40 hours beforehand, and then we have a crew of five to 10 people at each derby that kept keep the car running,” he said.

“My kids always come to watch, and this year they painted the car. We do this for fun, so it’s great that everyone can be a part of it.”

“The work that is involved beforehand is pretty important,” said Sherie Fox, Chris’s wife. “They have to go in and strip everything out, including the glass. They have to weld the doors on, and install all the safety precautions they are allowed to. There is a lot of welding and chaining involved.”

When asked by his children if they could use the shark again next year, he replied, “Of course we can. If that’s what you want.” He then scooped up his kids, and rejoined his family as they loaded up the car to head home.