Eleventh Annual Fritzler Corn Maize | TheFencePost.com

Eleventh Annual Fritzler Corn Maize

The design of the 2010 Fritzler Corn Maize is the Department of Defense logo and a tribute to their son Trevor Fritzler, who recently joined the U.S. Army.

You can always tell that fall is just around the corner when the corn mazes begin to show up. They seem to be everywhere. But there is one that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that is the Fritzler Corn Maize in La Salle, Colo.

The Fritzler Corn Maize is the original corn maze in Northern Colorado. Now in its 11th year, the Fritzler Maize gets bigger and better every year. There are 50 acres of the Fritzler family farm dedicated to the Corn Maize and the Pumpkin Patch and the corn maze itself is over 13 acres.

The corn maze is only a part of the Fritzler farm, “We are true farmers. My family has lived and farmed here since 1956 and I was born on the farm in 1957. I’m a third generation farmer here.” said Glen Fritzler, “This is a year round business. Besides the maze and the employees, there is the advertising, vendor contracts, promotion, displays, and all the rest of the paperwork. We have been building props in the shop all winter long and we are always remodeling something.”

The Fritzler Maize began in 2000 when Glen and Pam Fritzler were convinced by Glen’s cousin that they had the perfect location on Highway 85 to have a corn maze. Glen partnered with a fledgling corn maze consulting company in Utah owned by Brett Herbst, and the rest is history. Brett Herbst has now designed over 600 corn mazes and has over 200 clients. Glen and Pam Fritzler have been in the corn maze business for 11 years now and their corn maze had more than 20,000 visitors last year and has been featured on the Today Show.

Glen Fritzler’s sister Cheryl Mitchell remembers the first corn maze, “It was just a small thing. We had a generator for lights and my mother and I sold tickets out of a Pepsi stand and we sold glow sticks, pop, and water. That year, October 13th fell on a Friday and people came from every where. We were going to close the gates at 10 p.m., but people just kept coming from all over. We were finally able to close the gates at Midnight.”

The very first maze in 2000 was the new Denver Broncos logo and because the Fritzler family are big Broncos fans, there have been several mazes about the Broncos. There have also been a number of patriotic themes and when their son Trevor joined the U.S. Army, a Department of Defense logo saluting Trevor and all of the brave men and women who serve and protect our country seemed appropriate.

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“We surprised him with the design and cut it out without him knowing what the pattern was.” Glen Fritzler said, “At his going away party, I had a helicopter come in and he was the first one to go up. When he came down, there was about a hundred of us and we all lined up and saluted him when he got off. The top of the maze says ‘We Salute You’. At the bottom of the maze is the number of days until Trevor comes home and that number will be updated each year until he is home.”

From ground level the maze is a series of paths in 10-foot high corn. It is only from the air that you can really see how intricate the design of the corn maze is, and fortunately, tickets will be sold for helicopter rides during the daylight hours.

So how do you make a corn maze? A lot of the technique is a family secret, but Glen Fritzler did share the basics, “We do a regular planting on the 13 acres. We do plant a little bit late and use regular field corn with a little bit longer growing season. We design the maze on a computer and then use grid maps to make the pattern. It takes 24 sheets of paper to make the pattern.”

“One line on the grid map represents one row of corn on the grid map. When the corn is still fairly young, we put out flags as guide lines, and start cutting away.” Fritzler continued, “That’s what we call it. We actually remove the corn with a herbicide. It takes about five days to cut the pattern. The paths are roto- tillered, smoothed, and packed about a week before opening day.”

While it may not take many people to make the corn maze, it takes over 200 people to run it. Most of the employees are teenagers with limited working hours, so there are three daily shifts. The most visible employees are the yellow shirted Corn Cops. Besides being present to keep order in the maze, they are specially trained to give directions from anywhere in the maze.

There are roughly two miles of trails in the maze. There is one entrance and one exit. During the day, if you make all of the right decisions, it takes about 30 minutes to complete the maze, but most people take about an hour.

In the daytime most people in the maze are families. Another exciting dimension awaits visitors to the Fritzler corn maze after dark. The haunt begins! After dark, people flock to Scream Acres, one of the best haunts in Colorado. Scream Acres is filled with special effects, mechanical engineering, and eerie sound technology.

The Fritzler Corn Maize has something for every age. Everyone can have a good time here. If you have been before, the maze is more complicated than ever. If you have never been to the Fritzler Corn Maze, take a look at their web page, http://www.FritzlerMaze.com, and see everything that is available.

You can always tell that fall is just around the corner when the corn mazes begin to show up. They seem to be everywhere. But there is one that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that is the Fritzler Corn Maize in La Salle, Colo.

The Fritzler Corn Maize is the original corn maze in Northern Colorado. Now in its 11th year, the Fritzler Maize gets bigger and better every year. There are 50 acres of the Fritzler family farm dedicated to the Corn Maize and the Pumpkin Patch and the corn maze itself is over 13 acres.

The corn maze is only a part of the Fritzler farm, “We are true farmers. My family has lived and farmed here since 1956 and I was born on the farm in 1957. I’m a third generation farmer here.” said Glen Fritzler, “This is a year round business. Besides the maze and the employees, there is the advertising, vendor contracts, promotion, displays, and all the rest of the paperwork. We have been building props in the shop all winter long and we are always remodeling something.”

The Fritzler Maize began in 2000 when Glen and Pam Fritzler were convinced by Glen’s cousin that they had the perfect location on Highway 85 to have a corn maze. Glen partnered with a fledgling corn maze consulting company in Utah owned by Brett Herbst, and the rest is history. Brett Herbst has now designed over 600 corn mazes and has over 200 clients. Glen and Pam Fritzler have been in the corn maze business for 11 years now and their corn maze had more than 20,000 visitors last year and has been featured on the Today Show.

Glen Fritzler’s sister Cheryl Mitchell remembers the first corn maze, “It was just a small thing. We had a generator for lights and my mother and I sold tickets out of a Pepsi stand and we sold glow sticks, pop, and water. That year, October 13th fell on a Friday and people came from every where. We were going to close the gates at 10 p.m., but people just kept coming from all over. We were finally able to close the gates at Midnight.”

The very first maze in 2000 was the new Denver Broncos logo and because the Fritzler family are big Broncos fans, there have been several mazes about the Broncos. There have also been a number of patriotic themes and when their son Trevor joined the U.S. Army, a Department of Defense logo saluting Trevor and all of the brave men and women who serve and protect our country seemed appropriate.

“We surprised him with the design and cut it out without him knowing what the pattern was.” Glen Fritzler said, “At his going away party, I had a helicopter come in and he was the first one to go up. When he came down, there was about a hundred of us and we all lined up and saluted him when he got off. The top of the maze says ‘We Salute You’. At the bottom of the maze is the number of days until Trevor comes home and that number will be updated each year until he is home.”

From ground level the maze is a series of paths in 10-foot high corn. It is only from the air that you can really see how intricate the design of the corn maze is, and fortunately, tickets will be sold for helicopter rides during the daylight hours.

So how do you make a corn maze? A lot of the technique is a family secret, but Glen Fritzler did share the basics, “We do a regular planting on the 13 acres. We do plant a little bit late and use regular field corn with a little bit longer growing season. We design the maze on a computer and then use grid maps to make the pattern. It takes 24 sheets of paper to make the pattern.”

“One line on the grid map represents one row of corn on the grid map. When the corn is still fairly young, we put out flags as guide lines, and start cutting away.” Fritzler continued, “That’s what we call it. We actually remove the corn with a herbicide. It takes about five days to cut the pattern. The paths are roto- tillered, smoothed, and packed about a week before opening day.”

While it may not take many people to make the corn maze, it takes over 200 people to run it. Most of the employees are teenagers with limited working hours, so there are three daily shifts. The most visible employees are the yellow shirted Corn Cops. Besides being present to keep order in the maze, they are specially trained to give directions from anywhere in the maze.

There are roughly two miles of trails in the maze. There is one entrance and one exit. During the day, if you make all of the right decisions, it takes about 30 minutes to complete the maze, but most people take about an hour.

In the daytime most people in the maze are families. Another exciting dimension awaits visitors to the Fritzler corn maze after dark. The haunt begins! After dark, people flock to Scream Acres, one of the best haunts in Colorado. Scream Acres is filled with special effects, mechanical engineering, and eerie sound technology.

The Fritzler Corn Maize has something for every age. Everyone can have a good time here. If you have been before, the maze is more complicated than ever. If you have never been to the Fritzler Corn Maze, take a look at their web page, http://www.FritzlerMaze.com, and see everything that is available.

You can always tell that fall is just around the corner when the corn mazes begin to show up. They seem to be everywhere. But there is one that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that is the Fritzler Corn Maize in La Salle, Colo.

The Fritzler Corn Maize is the original corn maze in Northern Colorado. Now in its 11th year, the Fritzler Maize gets bigger and better every year. There are 50 acres of the Fritzler family farm dedicated to the Corn Maize and the Pumpkin Patch and the corn maze itself is over 13 acres.

The corn maze is only a part of the Fritzler farm, “We are true farmers. My family has lived and farmed here since 1956 and I was born on the farm in 1957. I’m a third generation farmer here.” said Glen Fritzler, “This is a year round business. Besides the maze and the employees, there is the advertising, vendor contracts, promotion, displays, and all the rest of the paperwork. We have been building props in the shop all winter long and we are always remodeling something.”

The Fritzler Maize began in 2000 when Glen and Pam Fritzler were convinced by Glen’s cousin that they had the perfect location on Highway 85 to have a corn maze. Glen partnered with a fledgling corn maze consulting company in Utah owned by Brett Herbst, and the rest is history. Brett Herbst has now designed over 600 corn mazes and has over 200 clients. Glen and Pam Fritzler have been in the corn maze business for 11 years now and their corn maze had more than 20,000 visitors last year and has been featured on the Today Show.

Glen Fritzler’s sister Cheryl Mitchell remembers the first corn maze, “It was just a small thing. We had a generator for lights and my mother and I sold tickets out of a Pepsi stand and we sold glow sticks, pop, and water. That year, October 13th fell on a Friday and people came from every where. We were going to close the gates at 10 p.m., but people just kept coming from all over. We were finally able to close the gates at Midnight.”

The very first maze in 2000 was the new Denver Broncos logo and because the Fritzler family are big Broncos fans, there have been several mazes about the Broncos. There have also been a number of patriotic themes and when their son Trevor joined the U.S. Army, a Department of Defense logo saluting Trevor and all of the brave men and women who serve and protect our country seemed appropriate.

“We surprised him with the design and cut it out without him knowing what the pattern was.” Glen Fritzler said, “At his going away party, I had a helicopter come in and he was the first one to go up. When he came down, there was about a hundred of us and we all lined up and saluted him when he got off. The top of the maze says ‘We Salute You’. At the bottom of the maze is the number of days until Trevor comes home and that number will be updated each year until he is home.”

From ground level the maze is a series of paths in 10-foot high corn. It is only from the air that you can really see how intricate the design of the corn maze is, and fortunately, tickets will be sold for helicopter rides during the daylight hours.

So how do you make a corn maze? A lot of the technique is a family secret, but Glen Fritzler did share the basics, “We do a regular planting on the 13 acres. We do plant a little bit late and use regular field corn with a little bit longer growing season. We design the maze on a computer and then use grid maps to make the pattern. It takes 24 sheets of paper to make the pattern.”

“One line on the grid map represents one row of corn on the grid map. When the corn is still fairly young, we put out flags as guide lines, and start cutting away.” Fritzler continued, “That’s what we call it. We actually remove the corn with a herbicide. It takes about five days to cut the pattern. The paths are roto- tillered, smoothed, and packed about a week before opening day.”

While it may not take many people to make the corn maze, it takes over 200 people to run it. Most of the employees are teenagers with limited working hours, so there are three daily shifts. The most visible employees are the yellow shirted Corn Cops. Besides being present to keep order in the maze, they are specially trained to give directions from anywhere in the maze.

There are roughly two miles of trails in the maze. There is one entrance and one exit. During the day, if you make all of the right decisions, it takes about 30 minutes to complete the maze, but most people take about an hour.

In the daytime most people in the maze are families. Another exciting dimension awaits visitors to the Fritzler corn maze after dark. The haunt begins! After dark, people flock to Scream Acres, one of the best haunts in Colorado. Scream Acres is filled with special effects, mechanical engineering, and eerie sound technology.

The Fritzler Corn Maize has something for every age. Everyone can have a good time here. If you have been before, the maze is more complicated than ever. If you have never been to the Fritzler Corn Maze, take a look at their web page, http://www.FritzlerMaze.com, and see everything that is available.

You can always tell that fall is just around the corner when the corn mazes begin to show up. They seem to be everywhere. But there is one that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that is the Fritzler Corn Maize in La Salle, Colo.

The Fritzler Corn Maize is the original corn maze in Northern Colorado. Now in its 11th year, the Fritzler Maize gets bigger and better every year. There are 50 acres of the Fritzler family farm dedicated to the Corn Maize and the Pumpkin Patch and the corn maze itself is over 13 acres.

The corn maze is only a part of the Fritzler farm, “We are true farmers. My family has lived and farmed here since 1956 and I was born on the farm in 1957. I’m a third generation farmer here.” said Glen Fritzler, “This is a year round business. Besides the maze and the employees, there is the advertising, vendor contracts, promotion, displays, and all the rest of the paperwork. We have been building props in the shop all winter long and we are always remodeling something.”

The Fritzler Maize began in 2000 when Glen and Pam Fritzler were convinced by Glen’s cousin that they had the perfect location on Highway 85 to have a corn maze. Glen partnered with a fledgling corn maze consulting company in Utah owned by Brett Herbst, and the rest is history. Brett Herbst has now designed over 600 corn mazes and has over 200 clients. Glen and Pam Fritzler have been in the corn maze business for 11 years now and their corn maze had more than 20,000 visitors last year and has been featured on the Today Show.

Glen Fritzler’s sister Cheryl Mitchell remembers the first corn maze, “It was just a small thing. We had a generator for lights and my mother and I sold tickets out of a Pepsi stand and we sold glow sticks, pop, and water. That year, October 13th fell on a Friday and people came from every where. We were going to close the gates at 10 p.m., but people just kept coming from all over. We were finally able to close the gates at Midnight.”

The very first maze in 2000 was the new Denver Broncos logo and because the Fritzler family are big Broncos fans, there have been several mazes about the Broncos. There have also been a number of patriotic themes and when their son Trevor joined the U.S. Army, a Department of Defense logo saluting Trevor and all of the brave men and women who serve and protect our country seemed appropriate.

“We surprised him with the design and cut it out without him knowing what the pattern was.” Glen Fritzler said, “At his going away party, I had a helicopter come in and he was the first one to go up. When he came down, there was about a hundred of us and we all lined up and saluted him when he got off. The top of the maze says ‘We Salute You’. At the bottom of the maze is the number of days until Trevor comes home and that number will be updated each year until he is home.”

From ground level the maze is a series of paths in 10-foot high corn. It is only from the air that you can really see how intricate the design of the corn maze is, and fortunately, tickets will be sold for helicopter rides during the daylight hours.

So how do you make a corn maze? A lot of the technique is a family secret, but Glen Fritzler did share the basics, “We do a regular planting on the 13 acres. We do plant a little bit late and use regular field corn with a little bit longer growing season. We design the maze on a computer and then use grid maps to make the pattern. It takes 24 sheets of paper to make the pattern.”

“One line on the grid map represents one row of corn on the grid map. When the corn is still fairly young, we put out flags as guide lines, and start cutting away.” Fritzler continued, “That’s what we call it. We actually remove the corn with a herbicide. It takes about five days to cut the pattern. The paths are roto- tillered, smoothed, and packed about a week before opening day.”

While it may not take many people to make the corn maze, it takes over 200 people to run it. Most of the employees are teenagers with limited working hours, so there are three daily shifts. The most visible employees are the yellow shirted Corn Cops. Besides being present to keep order in the maze, they are specially trained to give directions from anywhere in the maze.

There are roughly two miles of trails in the maze. There is one entrance and one exit. During the day, if you make all of the right decisions, it takes about 30 minutes to complete the maze, but most people take about an hour.

In the daytime most people in the maze are families. Another exciting dimension awaits visitors to the Fritzler corn maze after dark. The haunt begins! After dark, people flock to Scream Acres, one of the best haunts in Colorado. Scream Acres is filled with special effects, mechanical engineering, and eerie sound technology.

The Fritzler Corn Maize has something for every age. Everyone can have a good time here. If you have been before, the maze is more complicated than ever. If you have never been to the Fritzler Corn Maze, take a look at their web page, http://www.FritzlerMaze.com, and see everything that is available.

You can always tell that fall is just around the corner when the corn mazes begin to show up. They seem to be everywhere. But there is one that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that is the Fritzler Corn Maize in La Salle, Colo.

The Fritzler Corn Maize is the original corn maze in Northern Colorado. Now in its 11th year, the Fritzler Maize gets bigger and better every year. There are 50 acres of the Fritzler family farm dedicated to the Corn Maize and the Pumpkin Patch and the corn maze itself is over 13 acres.

The corn maze is only a part of the Fritzler farm, “We are true farmers. My family has lived and farmed here since 1956 and I was born on the farm in 1957. I’m a third generation farmer here.” said Glen Fritzler, “This is a year round business. Besides the maze and the employees, there is the advertising, vendor contracts, promotion, displays, and all the rest of the paperwork. We have been building props in the shop all winter long and we are always remodeling something.”

The Fritzler Maize began in 2000 when Glen and Pam Fritzler were convinced by Glen’s cousin that they had the perfect location on Highway 85 to have a corn maze. Glen partnered with a fledgling corn maze consulting company in Utah owned by Brett Herbst, and the rest is history. Brett Herbst has now designed over 600 corn mazes and has over 200 clients. Glen and Pam Fritzler have been in the corn maze business for 11 years now and their corn maze had more than 20,000 visitors last year and has been featured on the Today Show.

Glen Fritzler’s sister Cheryl Mitchell remembers the first corn maze, “It was just a small thing. We had a generator for lights and my mother and I sold tickets out of a Pepsi stand and we sold glow sticks, pop, and water. That year, October 13th fell on a Friday and people came from every where. We were going to close the gates at 10 p.m., but people just kept coming from all over. We were finally able to close the gates at Midnight.”

The very first maze in 2000 was the new Denver Broncos logo and because the Fritzler family are big Broncos fans, there have been several mazes about the Broncos. There have also been a number of patriotic themes and when their son Trevor joined the U.S. Army, a Department of Defense logo saluting Trevor and all of the brave men and women who serve and protect our country seemed appropriate.

“We surprised him with the design and cut it out without him knowing what the pattern was.” Glen Fritzler said, “At his going away party, I had a helicopter come in and he was the first one to go up. When he came down, there was about a hundred of us and we all lined up and saluted him when he got off. The top of the maze says ‘We Salute You’. At the bottom of the maze is the number of days until Trevor comes home and that number will be updated each year until he is home.”

From ground level the maze is a series of paths in 10-foot high corn. It is only from the air that you can really see how intricate the design of the corn maze is, and fortunately, tickets will be sold for helicopter rides during the daylight hours.

So how do you make a corn maze? A lot of the technique is a family secret, but Glen Fritzler did share the basics, “We do a regular planting on the 13 acres. We do plant a little bit late and use regular field corn with a little bit longer growing season. We design the maze on a computer and then use grid maps to make the pattern. It takes 24 sheets of paper to make the pattern.”

“One line on the grid map represents one row of corn on the grid map. When the corn is still fairly young, we put out flags as guide lines, and start cutting away.” Fritzler continued, “That’s what we call it. We actually remove the corn with a herbicide. It takes about five days to cut the pattern. The paths are roto- tillered, smoothed, and packed about a week before opening day.”

While it may not take many people to make the corn maze, it takes over 200 people to run it. Most of the employees are teenagers with limited working hours, so there are three daily shifts. The most visible employees are the yellow shirted Corn Cops. Besides being present to keep order in the maze, they are specially trained to give directions from anywhere in the maze.

There are roughly two miles of trails in the maze. There is one entrance and one exit. During the day, if you make all of the right decisions, it takes about 30 minutes to complete the maze, but most people take about an hour.

In the daytime most people in the maze are families. Another exciting dimension awaits visitors to the Fritzler corn maze after dark. The haunt begins! After dark, people flock to Scream Acres, one of the best haunts in Colorado. Scream Acres is filled with special effects, mechanical engineering, and eerie sound technology.

The Fritzler Corn Maize has something for every age. Everyone can have a good time here. If you have been before, the maze is more complicated than ever. If you have never been to the Fritzler Corn Maze, take a look at their web page, http://www.FritzlerMaze.com, and see everything that is available.

You can always tell that fall is just around the corner when the corn mazes begin to show up. They seem to be everywhere. But there is one that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that is the Fritzler Corn Maize in La Salle, Colo.

The Fritzler Corn Maize is the original corn maze in Northern Colorado. Now in its 11th year, the Fritzler Maize gets bigger and better every year. There are 50 acres of the Fritzler family farm dedicated to the Corn Maize and the Pumpkin Patch and the corn maze itself is over 13 acres.

The corn maze is only a part of the Fritzler farm, “We are true farmers. My family has lived and farmed here since 1956 and I was born on the farm in 1957. I’m a third generation farmer here.” said Glen Fritzler, “This is a year round business. Besides the maze and the employees, there is the advertising, vendor contracts, promotion, displays, and all the rest of the paperwork. We have been building props in the shop all winter long and we are always remodeling something.”

The Fritzler Maize began in 2000 when Glen and Pam Fritzler were convinced by Glen’s cousin that they had the perfect location on Highway 85 to have a corn maze. Glen partnered with a fledgling corn maze consulting company in Utah owned by Brett Herbst, and the rest is history. Brett Herbst has now designed over 600 corn mazes and has over 200 clients. Glen and Pam Fritzler have been in the corn maze business for 11 years now and their corn maze had more than 20,000 visitors last year and has been featured on the Today Show.

Glen Fritzler’s sister Cheryl Mitchell remembers the first corn maze, “It was just a small thing. We had a generator for lights and my mother and I sold tickets out of a Pepsi stand and we sold glow sticks, pop, and water. That year, October 13th fell on a Friday and people came from every where. We were going to close the gates at 10 p.m., but people just kept coming from all over. We were finally able to close the gates at Midnight.”

The very first maze in 2000 was the new Denver Broncos logo and because the Fritzler family are big Broncos fans, there have been several mazes about the Broncos. There have also been a number of patriotic themes and when their son Trevor joined the U.S. Army, a Department of Defense logo saluting Trevor and all of the brave men and women who serve and protect our country seemed appropriate.

“We surprised him with the design and cut it out without him knowing what the pattern was.” Glen Fritzler said, “At his going away party, I had a helicopter come in and he was the first one to go up. When he came down, there was about a hundred of us and we all lined up and saluted him when he got off. The top of the maze says ‘We Salute You’. At the bottom of the maze is the number of days until Trevor comes home and that number will be updated each year until he is home.”

From ground level the maze is a series of paths in 10-foot high corn. It is only from the air that you can really see how intricate the design of the corn maze is, and fortunately, tickets will be sold for helicopter rides during the daylight hours.

So how do you make a corn maze? A lot of the technique is a family secret, but Glen Fritzler did share the basics, “We do a regular planting on the 13 acres. We do plant a little bit late and use regular field corn with a little bit longer growing season. We design the maze on a computer and then use grid maps to make the pattern. It takes 24 sheets of paper to make the pattern.”

“One line on the grid map represents one row of corn on the grid map. When the corn is still fairly young, we put out flags as guide lines, and start cutting away.” Fritzler continued, “That’s what we call it. We actually remove the corn with a herbicide. It takes about five days to cut the pattern. The paths are roto- tillered, smoothed, and packed about a week before opening day.”

While it may not take many people to make the corn maze, it takes over 200 people to run it. Most of the employees are teenagers with limited working hours, so there are three daily shifts. The most visible employees are the yellow shirted Corn Cops. Besides being present to keep order in the maze, they are specially trained to give directions from anywhere in the maze.

There are roughly two miles of trails in the maze. There is one entrance and one exit. During the day, if you make all of the right decisions, it takes about 30 minutes to complete the maze, but most people take about an hour.

In the daytime most people in the maze are families. Another exciting dimension awaits visitors to the Fritzler corn maze after dark. The haunt begins! After dark, people flock to Scream Acres, one of the best haunts in Colorado. Scream Acres is filled with special effects, mechanical engineering, and eerie sound technology.

The Fritzler Corn Maize has something for every age. Everyone can have a good time here. If you have been before, the maze is more complicated than ever. If you have never been to the Fritzler Corn Maze, take a look at their web page, http://www.FritzlerMaze.com, and see everything that is available.

You can always tell that fall is just around the corner when the corn mazes begin to show up. They seem to be everywhere. But there is one that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that is the Fritzler Corn Maize in La Salle, Colo.

The Fritzler Corn Maize is the original corn maze in Northern Colorado. Now in its 11th year, the Fritzler Maize gets bigger and better every year. There are 50 acres of the Fritzler family farm dedicated to the Corn Maize and the Pumpkin Patch and the corn maze itself is over 13 acres.

The corn maze is only a part of the Fritzler farm, “We are true farmers. My family has lived and farmed here since 1956 and I was born on the farm in 1957. I’m a third generation farmer here.” said Glen Fritzler, “This is a year round business. Besides the maze and the employees, there is the advertising, vendor contracts, promotion, displays, and all the rest of the paperwork. We have been building props in the shop all winter long and we are always remodeling something.”

The Fritzler Maize began in 2000 when Glen and Pam Fritzler were convinced by Glen’s cousin that they had the perfect location on Highway 85 to have a corn maze. Glen partnered with a fledgling corn maze consulting company in Utah owned by Brett Herbst, and the rest is history. Brett Herbst has now designed over 600 corn mazes and has over 200 clients. Glen and Pam Fritzler have been in the corn maze business for 11 years now and their corn maze had more than 20,000 visitors last year and has been featured on the Today Show.

Glen Fritzler’s sister Cheryl Mitchell remembers the first corn maze, “It was just a small thing. We had a generator for lights and my mother and I sold tickets out of a Pepsi stand and we sold glow sticks, pop, and water. That year, October 13th fell on a Friday and people came from every where. We were going to close the gates at 10 p.m., but people just kept coming from all over. We were finally able to close the gates at Midnight.”

The very first maze in 2000 was the new Denver Broncos logo and because the Fritzler family are big Broncos fans, there have been several mazes about the Broncos. There have also been a number of patriotic themes and when their son Trevor joined the U.S. Army, a Department of Defense logo saluting Trevor and all of the brave men and women who serve and protect our country seemed appropriate.

“We surprised him with the design and cut it out without him knowing what the pattern was.” Glen Fritzler said, “At his going away party, I had a helicopter come in and he was the first one to go up. When he came down, there was about a hundred of us and we all lined up and saluted him when he got off. The top of the maze says ‘We Salute You’. At the bottom of the maze is the number of days until Trevor comes home and that number will be updated each year until he is home.”

From ground level the maze is a series of paths in 10-foot high corn. It is only from the air that you can really see how intricate the design of the corn maze is, and fortunately, tickets will be sold for helicopter rides during the daylight hours.

So how do you make a corn maze? A lot of the technique is a family secret, but Glen Fritzler did share the basics, “We do a regular planting on the 13 acres. We do plant a little bit late and use regular field corn with a little bit longer growing season. We design the maze on a computer and then use grid maps to make the pattern. It takes 24 sheets of paper to make the pattern.”

“One line on the grid map represents one row of corn on the grid map. When the corn is still fairly young, we put out flags as guide lines, and start cutting away.” Fritzler continued, “That’s what we call it. We actually remove the corn with a herbicide. It takes about five days to cut the pattern. The paths are roto- tillered, smoothed, and packed about a week before opening day.”

While it may not take many people to make the corn maze, it takes over 200 people to run it. Most of the employees are teenagers with limited working hours, so there are three daily shifts. The most visible employees are the yellow shirted Corn Cops. Besides being present to keep order in the maze, they are specially trained to give directions from anywhere in the maze.

There are roughly two miles of trails in the maze. There is one entrance and one exit. During the day, if you make all of the right decisions, it takes about 30 minutes to complete the maze, but most people take about an hour.

In the daytime most people in the maze are families. Another exciting dimension awaits visitors to the Fritzler corn maze after dark. The haunt begins! After dark, people flock to Scream Acres, one of the best haunts in Colorado. Scream Acres is filled with special effects, mechanical engineering, and eerie sound technology.

The Fritzler Corn Maize has something for every age. Everyone can have a good time here. If you have been before, the maze is more complicated than ever. If you have never been to the Fritzler Corn Maze, take a look at their web page, http://www.FritzlerMaze.com, and see everything that is available.

You can always tell that fall is just around the corner when the corn mazes begin to show up. They seem to be everywhere. But there is one that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that is the Fritzler Corn Maize in La Salle, Colo.

The Fritzler Corn Maize is the original corn maze in Northern Colorado. Now in its 11th year, the Fritzler Maize gets bigger and better every year. There are 50 acres of the Fritzler family farm dedicated to the Corn Maize and the Pumpkin Patch and the corn maze itself is over 13 acres.

The corn maze is only a part of the Fritzler farm, “We are true farmers. My family has lived and farmed here since 1956 and I was born on the farm in 1957. I’m a third generation farmer here.” said Glen Fritzler, “This is a year round business. Besides the maze and the employees, there is the advertising, vendor contracts, promotion, displays, and all the rest of the paperwork. We have been building props in the shop all winter long and we are always remodeling something.”

The Fritzler Maize began in 2000 when Glen and Pam Fritzler were convinced by Glen’s cousin that they had the perfect location on Highway 85 to have a corn maze. Glen partnered with a fledgling corn maze consulting company in Utah owned by Brett Herbst, and the rest is history. Brett Herbst has now designed over 600 corn mazes and has over 200 clients. Glen and Pam Fritzler have been in the corn maze business for 11 years now and their corn maze had more than 20,000 visitors last year and has been featured on the Today Show.

Glen Fritzler’s sister Cheryl Mitchell remembers the first corn maze, “It was just a small thing. We had a generator for lights and my mother and I sold tickets out of a Pepsi stand and we sold glow sticks, pop, and water. That year, October 13th fell on a Friday and people came from every where. We were going to close the gates at 10 p.m., but people just kept coming from all over. We were finally able to close the gates at Midnight.”

The very first maze in 2000 was the new Denver Broncos logo and because the Fritzler family are big Broncos fans, there have been several mazes about the Broncos. There have also been a number of patriotic themes and when their son Trevor joined the U.S. Army, a Department of Defense logo saluting Trevor and all of the brave men and women who serve and protect our country seemed appropriate.

“We surprised him with the design and cut it out without him knowing what the pattern was.” Glen Fritzler said, “At his going away party, I had a helicopter come in and he was the first one to go up. When he came down, there was about a hundred of us and we all lined up and saluted him when he got off. The top of the maze says ‘We Salute You’. At the bottom of the maze is the number of days until Trevor comes home and that number will be updated each year until he is home.”

From ground level the maze is a series of paths in 10-foot high corn. It is only from the air that you can really see how intricate the design of the corn maze is, and fortunately, tickets will be sold for helicopter rides during the daylight hours.

So how do you make a corn maze? A lot of the technique is a family secret, but Glen Fritzler did share the basics, “We do a regular planting on the 13 acres. We do plant a little bit late and use regular field corn with a little bit longer growing season. We design the maze on a computer and then use grid maps to make the pattern. It takes 24 sheets of paper to make the pattern.”

“One line on the grid map represents one row of corn on the grid map. When the corn is still fairly young, we put out flags as guide lines, and start cutting away.” Fritzler continued, “That’s what we call it. We actually remove the corn with a herbicide. It takes about five days to cut the pattern. The paths are roto- tillered, smoothed, and packed about a week before opening day.”

While it may not take many people to make the corn maze, it takes over 200 people to run it. Most of the employees are teenagers with limited working hours, so there are three daily shifts. The most visible employees are the yellow shirted Corn Cops. Besides being present to keep order in the maze, they are specially trained to give directions from anywhere in the maze.

There are roughly two miles of trails in the maze. There is one entrance and one exit. During the day, if you make all of the right decisions, it takes about 30 minutes to complete the maze, but most people take about an hour.

In the daytime most people in the maze are families. Another exciting dimension awaits visitors to the Fritzler corn maze after dark. The haunt begins! After dark, people flock to Scream Acres, one of the best haunts in Colorado. Scream Acres is filled with special effects, mechanical engineering, and eerie sound technology.

The Fritzler Corn Maize has something for every age. Everyone can have a good time here. If you have been before, the maze is more complicated than ever. If you have never been to the Fritzler Corn Maze, take a look at their web page, http://www.FritzlerMaze.com, and see everything that is available.