Elizabeth Stampede puts on another big show in Elizabeth, Colo. | TheFencePost.com

Elizabeth Stampede puts on another big show in Elizabeth, Colo.

Hayden, Colo., cowboy Jake Booco rode the first high kick, but couldn't hang on the for the rest during Sunday afternoon's crowd pleasing bull riding section.

“To put on a great rodeo is what we’re trying to do,” stated Norm Almquist, president of the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo Board of Directors. “We get a lot of support from our community.”

The community support in 2010 not only came in the form of about 200 volunteers making the event run like a well-oiled machine, it was also displayed by 6,000-plus spectators filling the stands to watch high-octane PBR and PRCA exploits over three gorgeous days during the first weekend of June.

A sell-out crowd watched Friday night’s PBR matchups and a rowdy time was had by all as Corey Sullivan won the long round and Wagner Luciana earned the average title during the energetic bull riding only affair. While the award-winning rodeo with more than 100 years in its rear view mirror is always a popular attraction, word of mouth and a fine weather report jammed the grandstands during three more rounds of PRCA action on Saturday and Sunday.

To get a sense of the venue’s regional status, Mountain States Circuit cowboys have eight times voted it Best Small Rodeo of the Year. Among its many attributes are substantial added money, a scenic country location of tall pines and mountain views, friendly small-town hospitality, enthusiastic fan support, a spot on the calendar that helps cowboys prepare for the busy summer, and some of the best bucking stock in the circuit. All these traits, plus more, help make the rodeo one of the finest of its size in the country, drawing contestants from over a dozen states and even an extra country or two.

To discover why, just ask the contestants.

“I come here every year,” said Travis Nevius, a saddle bronc rider from Hartsell, Colo. Nevius talked in an easy tone while his young son played pretend cowboy nearby using dad’s saddle bronc gear. “A lot of places, they don’t let you take your kids (behind the chutes), so it’s kind of neat. They treat us really well.”

Recommended Stories For You

“The hospitality and the people and the way it’s run make it one of the best,” offered Colorado cowboy Josh Peek, the 2009 NFR All-Around champion. Peek placed third in the steer wrestling portion of the weekend and enjoys the environment whatever his finish. “This is one of my favorite rodeos.”

“They have an area for the contestants and their families to go hang out and relax,” described Shali Lord during a previous appearance. Lord, a Colorado barrel racer and fan favorite, appreciates the way contestants are treated in Elizabeth. “They have meals and it’s just nice to go before the rodeo and be able to eat and take your family and friends. It’s really one of the better circuit rodeos.”

“I love this place,” praised Kelly Timberman, a Wyoming bareback cowboy and former PRCA world title winner. Timberman nailed a winning score of 80 points on a big, strong buckskin on Saturday night and feels at home at the Elizabeth rodeo. “It takes a heck of a committee to put on a rodeo like this (and) it’s a blessing for us to be able to come to it. Then we get here and they treat us like rock stars. Who wouldn’t want to come to this rodeo?”

Stampede volunteers are happy to hear the compliments.

“It gives you goose bumps and makes you feel wonderful,” said Carin Rush, vice-chairman of a crew of Hospitality volunteers who work from 5 a.m. until after midnight each day to serve competitors and their families. “All these contestants are traveling on the road. A lot of places they go, they don’t get home-cooked meals. It feels good that we can make them have a homey environment.”

But it takes more than happy contestants to make a crowd-pleasing rodeo. Explosive action inside the arena is a must, and Burns Rodeo Company has been up to the challenge for 20 plus years. While their quality bucking horses, including NFR level broncs, provide sturdy scores on an annual basis, the company has an even bigger reputation for rank and ornery bulls – the kind that let ‘er rip and make cowboys flip. Out of more than 50 bull riders, only single digit numbers kept themselves dirt free for the mandated eight seconds. An 80-point ride by Josh Koschell on Saturday night earned the buckle for the weekend, but there were plenty of awe inspiring moments spread out over the rest of the performances, including Sunday afternoon’s double section of riders who all met arena sand up close and personal before the horn. It is safe to say a Burns bull doesn’t just toss a rider from its back and be done with him; it throws him off and proceeds to make sure the cowboy feels a need to run for his very life.

“I might be kind of old school, but I like those big and strong bucking bulls,” revealed Hal Burns after the rodeo’s finish. “I like the big, strong fifteen and sixteen hundred pound bulls.”

Asked his opinion regarding the Elizabeth venue, Burns was generous with compliments.

“Some places you get a little short of cowboys, but they come back to Elizabeth – they like to come to Elizabeth,” the big man stated with conviction. “The committee goes out of their way to take care of the contestants. That’s why we have world champions (and) NFR cowboys here. There’s just a lot of good people we work with, here,” Burns continued. “We try to give them a professional product and they run a professional rodeo and it works out good for both of us.”

Judging by the large ticket buying crowds and reaction from the rodeo’s president of the Board, it appears 2010’s product worked out good for everyone.

“It was our best rodeo ever (and) I think it was the best crowd we’ve ever had,” observed Almquist after the dust settled. “(The Elizabeth Stampede) started out with 10 guys deciding they were going to put on a rodeo and we’ve grown to about as big as you can get as a small rodeo. We are always trying to earn another Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo award,” he added with a laugh. “We want to be the best small rodeo of the United States.”

If they don’t win Best Small Rodeo of the Year for the whole rodeo country, this year’s edition sure looks good for Mountain States Circuit award number nine.

“To put on a great rodeo is what we’re trying to do,” stated Norm Almquist, president of the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo Board of Directors. “We get a lot of support from our community.”

The community support in 2010 not only came in the form of about 200 volunteers making the event run like a well-oiled machine, it was also displayed by 6,000-plus spectators filling the stands to watch high-octane PBR and PRCA exploits over three gorgeous days during the first weekend of June.

A sell-out crowd watched Friday night’s PBR matchups and a rowdy time was had by all as Corey Sullivan won the long round and Wagner Luciana earned the average title during the energetic bull riding only affair. While the award-winning rodeo with more than 100 years in its rear view mirror is always a popular attraction, word of mouth and a fine weather report jammed the grandstands during three more rounds of PRCA action on Saturday and Sunday.

To get a sense of the venue’s regional status, Mountain States Circuit cowboys have eight times voted it Best Small Rodeo of the Year. Among its many attributes are substantial added money, a scenic country location of tall pines and mountain views, friendly small-town hospitality, enthusiastic fan support, a spot on the calendar that helps cowboys prepare for the busy summer, and some of the best bucking stock in the circuit. All these traits, plus more, help make the rodeo one of the finest of its size in the country, drawing contestants from over a dozen states and even an extra country or two.

To discover why, just ask the contestants.

“I come here every year,” said Travis Nevius, a saddle bronc rider from Hartsell, Colo. Nevius talked in an easy tone while his young son played pretend cowboy nearby using dad’s saddle bronc gear. “A lot of places, they don’t let you take your kids (behind the chutes), so it’s kind of neat. They treat us really well.”

“The hospitality and the people and the way it’s run make it one of the best,” offered Colorado cowboy Josh Peek, the 2009 NFR All-Around champion. Peek placed third in the steer wrestling portion of the weekend and enjoys the environment whatever his finish. “This is one of my favorite rodeos.”

“They have an area for the contestants and their families to go hang out and relax,” described Shali Lord during a previous appearance. Lord, a Colorado barrel racer and fan favorite, appreciates the way contestants are treated in Elizabeth. “They have meals and it’s just nice to go before the rodeo and be able to eat and take your family and friends. It’s really one of the better circuit rodeos.”

“I love this place,” praised Kelly Timberman, a Wyoming bareback cowboy and former PRCA world title winner. Timberman nailed a winning score of 80 points on a big, strong buckskin on Saturday night and feels at home at the Elizabeth rodeo. “It takes a heck of a committee to put on a rodeo like this (and) it’s a blessing for us to be able to come to it. Then we get here and they treat us like rock stars. Who wouldn’t want to come to this rodeo?”

Stampede volunteers are happy to hear the compliments.

“It gives you goose bumps and makes you feel wonderful,” said Carin Rush, vice-chairman of a crew of Hospitality volunteers who work from 5 a.m. until after midnight each day to serve competitors and their families. “All these contestants are traveling on the road. A lot of places they go, they don’t get home-cooked meals. It feels good that we can make them have a homey environment.”

But it takes more than happy contestants to make a crowd-pleasing rodeo. Explosive action inside the arena is a must, and Burns Rodeo Company has been up to the challenge for 20 plus years. While their quality bucking horses, including NFR level broncs, provide sturdy scores on an annual basis, the company has an even bigger reputation for rank and ornery bulls – the kind that let ‘er rip and make cowboys flip. Out of more than 50 bull riders, only single digit numbers kept themselves dirt free for the mandated eight seconds. An 80-point ride by Josh Koschell on Saturday night earned the buckle for the weekend, but there were plenty of awe inspiring moments spread out over the rest of the performances, including Sunday afternoon’s double section of riders who all met arena sand up close and personal before the horn. It is safe to say a Burns bull doesn’t just toss a rider from its back and be done with him; it throws him off and proceeds to make sure the cowboy feels a need to run for his very life.

“I might be kind of old school, but I like those big and strong bucking bulls,” revealed Hal Burns after the rodeo’s finish. “I like the big, strong fifteen and sixteen hundred pound bulls.”

Asked his opinion regarding the Elizabeth venue, Burns was generous with compliments.

“Some places you get a little short of cowboys, but they come back to Elizabeth – they like to come to Elizabeth,” the big man stated with conviction. “The committee goes out of their way to take care of the contestants. That’s why we have world champions (and) NFR cowboys here. There’s just a lot of good people we work with, here,” Burns continued. “We try to give them a professional product and they run a professional rodeo and it works out good for both of us.”

Judging by the large ticket buying crowds and reaction from the rodeo’s president of the Board, it appears 2010’s product worked out good for everyone.

“It was our best rodeo ever (and) I think it was the best crowd we’ve ever had,” observed Almquist after the dust settled. “(The Elizabeth Stampede) started out with 10 guys deciding they were going to put on a rodeo and we’ve grown to about as big as you can get as a small rodeo. We are always trying to earn another Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo award,” he added with a laugh. “We want to be the best small rodeo of the United States.”

If they don’t win Best Small Rodeo of the Year for the whole rodeo country, this year’s edition sure looks good for Mountain States Circuit award number nine.

“To put on a great rodeo is what we’re trying to do,” stated Norm Almquist, president of the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo Board of Directors. “We get a lot of support from our community.”

The community support in 2010 not only came in the form of about 200 volunteers making the event run like a well-oiled machine, it was also displayed by 6,000-plus spectators filling the stands to watch high-octane PBR and PRCA exploits over three gorgeous days during the first weekend of June.

A sell-out crowd watched Friday night’s PBR matchups and a rowdy time was had by all as Corey Sullivan won the long round and Wagner Luciana earned the average title during the energetic bull riding only affair. While the award-winning rodeo with more than 100 years in its rear view mirror is always a popular attraction, word of mouth and a fine weather report jammed the grandstands during three more rounds of PRCA action on Saturday and Sunday.

To get a sense of the venue’s regional status, Mountain States Circuit cowboys have eight times voted it Best Small Rodeo of the Year. Among its many attributes are substantial added money, a scenic country location of tall pines and mountain views, friendly small-town hospitality, enthusiastic fan support, a spot on the calendar that helps cowboys prepare for the busy summer, and some of the best bucking stock in the circuit. All these traits, plus more, help make the rodeo one of the finest of its size in the country, drawing contestants from over a dozen states and even an extra country or two.

To discover why, just ask the contestants.

“I come here every year,” said Travis Nevius, a saddle bronc rider from Hartsell, Colo. Nevius talked in an easy tone while his young son played pretend cowboy nearby using dad’s saddle bronc gear. “A lot of places, they don’t let you take your kids (behind the chutes), so it’s kind of neat. They treat us really well.”

“The hospitality and the people and the way it’s run make it one of the best,” offered Colorado cowboy Josh Peek, the 2009 NFR All-Around champion. Peek placed third in the steer wrestling portion of the weekend and enjoys the environment whatever his finish. “This is one of my favorite rodeos.”

“They have an area for the contestants and their families to go hang out and relax,” described Shali Lord during a previous appearance. Lord, a Colorado barrel racer and fan favorite, appreciates the way contestants are treated in Elizabeth. “They have meals and it’s just nice to go before the rodeo and be able to eat and take your family and friends. It’s really one of the better circuit rodeos.”

“I love this place,” praised Kelly Timberman, a Wyoming bareback cowboy and former PRCA world title winner. Timberman nailed a winning score of 80 points on a big, strong buckskin on Saturday night and feels at home at the Elizabeth rodeo. “It takes a heck of a committee to put on a rodeo like this (and) it’s a blessing for us to be able to come to it. Then we get here and they treat us like rock stars. Who wouldn’t want to come to this rodeo?”

Stampede volunteers are happy to hear the compliments.

“It gives you goose bumps and makes you feel wonderful,” said Carin Rush, vice-chairman of a crew of Hospitality volunteers who work from 5 a.m. until after midnight each day to serve competitors and their families. “All these contestants are traveling on the road. A lot of places they go, they don’t get home-cooked meals. It feels good that we can make them have a homey environment.”

But it takes more than happy contestants to make a crowd-pleasing rodeo. Explosive action inside the arena is a must, and Burns Rodeo Company has been up to the challenge for 20 plus years. While their quality bucking horses, including NFR level broncs, provide sturdy scores on an annual basis, the company has an even bigger reputation for rank and ornery bulls – the kind that let ‘er rip and make cowboys flip. Out of more than 50 bull riders, only single digit numbers kept themselves dirt free for the mandated eight seconds. An 80-point ride by Josh Koschell on Saturday night earned the buckle for the weekend, but there were plenty of awe inspiring moments spread out over the rest of the performances, including Sunday afternoon’s double section of riders who all met arena sand up close and personal before the horn. It is safe to say a Burns bull doesn’t just toss a rider from its back and be done with him; it throws him off and proceeds to make sure the cowboy feels a need to run for his very life.

“I might be kind of old school, but I like those big and strong bucking bulls,” revealed Hal Burns after the rodeo’s finish. “I like the big, strong fifteen and sixteen hundred pound bulls.”

Asked his opinion regarding the Elizabeth venue, Burns was generous with compliments.

“Some places you get a little short of cowboys, but they come back to Elizabeth – they like to come to Elizabeth,” the big man stated with conviction. “The committee goes out of their way to take care of the contestants. That’s why we have world champions (and) NFR cowboys here. There’s just a lot of good people we work with, here,” Burns continued. “We try to give them a professional product and they run a professional rodeo and it works out good for both of us.”

Judging by the large ticket buying crowds and reaction from the rodeo’s president of the Board, it appears 2010’s product worked out good for everyone.

“It was our best rodeo ever (and) I think it was the best crowd we’ve ever had,” observed Almquist after the dust settled. “(The Elizabeth Stampede) started out with 10 guys deciding they were going to put on a rodeo and we’ve grown to about as big as you can get as a small rodeo. We are always trying to earn another Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo award,” he added with a laugh. “We want to be the best small rodeo of the United States.”

If they don’t win Best Small Rodeo of the Year for the whole rodeo country, this year’s edition sure looks good for Mountain States Circuit award number nine.

“To put on a great rodeo is what we’re trying to do,” stated Norm Almquist, president of the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo Board of Directors. “We get a lot of support from our community.”

The community support in 2010 not only came in the form of about 200 volunteers making the event run like a well-oiled machine, it was also displayed by 6,000-plus spectators filling the stands to watch high-octane PBR and PRCA exploits over three gorgeous days during the first weekend of June.

A sell-out crowd watched Friday night’s PBR matchups and a rowdy time was had by all as Corey Sullivan won the long round and Wagner Luciana earned the average title during the energetic bull riding only affair. While the award-winning rodeo with more than 100 years in its rear view mirror is always a popular attraction, word of mouth and a fine weather report jammed the grandstands during three more rounds of PRCA action on Saturday and Sunday.

To get a sense of the venue’s regional status, Mountain States Circuit cowboys have eight times voted it Best Small Rodeo of the Year. Among its many attributes are substantial added money, a scenic country location of tall pines and mountain views, friendly small-town hospitality, enthusiastic fan support, a spot on the calendar that helps cowboys prepare for the busy summer, and some of the best bucking stock in the circuit. All these traits, plus more, help make the rodeo one of the finest of its size in the country, drawing contestants from over a dozen states and even an extra country or two.

To discover why, just ask the contestants.

“I come here every year,” said Travis Nevius, a saddle bronc rider from Hartsell, Colo. Nevius talked in an easy tone while his young son played pretend cowboy nearby using dad’s saddle bronc gear. “A lot of places, they don’t let you take your kids (behind the chutes), so it’s kind of neat. They treat us really well.”

“The hospitality and the people and the way it’s run make it one of the best,” offered Colorado cowboy Josh Peek, the 2009 NFR All-Around champion. Peek placed third in the steer wrestling portion of the weekend and enjoys the environment whatever his finish. “This is one of my favorite rodeos.”

“They have an area for the contestants and their families to go hang out and relax,” described Shali Lord during a previous appearance. Lord, a Colorado barrel racer and fan favorite, appreciates the way contestants are treated in Elizabeth. “They have meals and it’s just nice to go before the rodeo and be able to eat and take your family and friends. It’s really one of the better circuit rodeos.”

“I love this place,” praised Kelly Timberman, a Wyoming bareback cowboy and former PRCA world title winner. Timberman nailed a winning score of 80 points on a big, strong buckskin on Saturday night and feels at home at the Elizabeth rodeo. “It takes a heck of a committee to put on a rodeo like this (and) it’s a blessing for us to be able to come to it. Then we get here and they treat us like rock stars. Who wouldn’t want to come to this rodeo?”

Stampede volunteers are happy to hear the compliments.

“It gives you goose bumps and makes you feel wonderful,” said Carin Rush, vice-chairman of a crew of Hospitality volunteers who work from 5 a.m. until after midnight each day to serve competitors and their families. “All these contestants are traveling on the road. A lot of places they go, they don’t get home-cooked meals. It feels good that we can make them have a homey environment.”

But it takes more than happy contestants to make a crowd-pleasing rodeo. Explosive action inside the arena is a must, and Burns Rodeo Company has been up to the challenge for 20 plus years. While their quality bucking horses, including NFR level broncs, provide sturdy scores on an annual basis, the company has an even bigger reputation for rank and ornery bulls – the kind that let ‘er rip and make cowboys flip. Out of more than 50 bull riders, only single digit numbers kept themselves dirt free for the mandated eight seconds. An 80-point ride by Josh Koschell on Saturday night earned the buckle for the weekend, but there were plenty of awe inspiring moments spread out over the rest of the performances, including Sunday afternoon’s double section of riders who all met arena sand up close and personal before the horn. It is safe to say a Burns bull doesn’t just toss a rider from its back and be done with him; it throws him off and proceeds to make sure the cowboy feels a need to run for his very life.

“I might be kind of old school, but I like those big and strong bucking bulls,” revealed Hal Burns after the rodeo’s finish. “I like the big, strong fifteen and sixteen hundred pound bulls.”

Asked his opinion regarding the Elizabeth venue, Burns was generous with compliments.

“Some places you get a little short of cowboys, but they come back to Elizabeth – they like to come to Elizabeth,” the big man stated with conviction. “The committee goes out of their way to take care of the contestants. That’s why we have world champions (and) NFR cowboys here. There’s just a lot of good people we work with, here,” Burns continued. “We try to give them a professional product and they run a professional rodeo and it works out good for both of us.”

Judging by the large ticket buying crowds and reaction from the rodeo’s president of the Board, it appears 2010’s product worked out good for everyone.

“It was our best rodeo ever (and) I think it was the best crowd we’ve ever had,” observed Almquist after the dust settled. “(The Elizabeth Stampede) started out with 10 guys deciding they were going to put on a rodeo and we’ve grown to about as big as you can get as a small rodeo. We are always trying to earn another Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo award,” he added with a laugh. “We want to be the best small rodeo of the United States.”

If they don’t win Best Small Rodeo of the Year for the whole rodeo country, this year’s edition sure looks good for Mountain States Circuit award number nine.

“To put on a great rodeo is what we’re trying to do,” stated Norm Almquist, president of the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo Board of Directors. “We get a lot of support from our community.”

The community support in 2010 not only came in the form of about 200 volunteers making the event run like a well-oiled machine, it was also displayed by 6,000-plus spectators filling the stands to watch high-octane PBR and PRCA exploits over three gorgeous days during the first weekend of June.

A sell-out crowd watched Friday night’s PBR matchups and a rowdy time was had by all as Corey Sullivan won the long round and Wagner Luciana earned the average title during the energetic bull riding only affair. While the award-winning rodeo with more than 100 years in its rear view mirror is always a popular attraction, word of mouth and a fine weather report jammed the grandstands during three more rounds of PRCA action on Saturday and Sunday.

To get a sense of the venue’s regional status, Mountain States Circuit cowboys have eight times voted it Best Small Rodeo of the Year. Among its many attributes are substantial added money, a scenic country location of tall pines and mountain views, friendly small-town hospitality, enthusiastic fan support, a spot on the calendar that helps cowboys prepare for the busy summer, and some of the best bucking stock in the circuit. All these traits, plus more, help make the rodeo one of the finest of its size in the country, drawing contestants from over a dozen states and even an extra country or two.

To discover why, just ask the contestants.

“I come here every year,” said Travis Nevius, a saddle bronc rider from Hartsell, Colo. Nevius talked in an easy tone while his young son played pretend cowboy nearby using dad’s saddle bronc gear. “A lot of places, they don’t let you take your kids (behind the chutes), so it’s kind of neat. They treat us really well.”

“The hospitality and the people and the way it’s run make it one of the best,” offered Colorado cowboy Josh Peek, the 2009 NFR All-Around champion. Peek placed third in the steer wrestling portion of the weekend and enjoys the environment whatever his finish. “This is one of my favorite rodeos.”

“They have an area for the contestants and their families to go hang out and relax,” described Shali Lord during a previous appearance. Lord, a Colorado barrel racer and fan favorite, appreciates the way contestants are treated in Elizabeth. “They have meals and it’s just nice to go before the rodeo and be able to eat and take your family and friends. It’s really one of the better circuit rodeos.”

“I love this place,” praised Kelly Timberman, a Wyoming bareback cowboy and former PRCA world title winner. Timberman nailed a winning score of 80 points on a big, strong buckskin on Saturday night and feels at home at the Elizabeth rodeo. “It takes a heck of a committee to put on a rodeo like this (and) it’s a blessing for us to be able to come to it. Then we get here and they treat us like rock stars. Who wouldn’t want to come to this rodeo?”

Stampede volunteers are happy to hear the compliments.

“It gives you goose bumps and makes you feel wonderful,” said Carin Rush, vice-chairman of a crew of Hospitality volunteers who work from 5 a.m. until after midnight each day to serve competitors and their families. “All these contestants are traveling on the road. A lot of places they go, they don’t get home-cooked meals. It feels good that we can make them have a homey environment.”

But it takes more than happy contestants to make a crowd-pleasing rodeo. Explosive action inside the arena is a must, and Burns Rodeo Company has been up to the challenge for 20 plus years. While their quality bucking horses, including NFR level broncs, provide sturdy scores on an annual basis, the company has an even bigger reputation for rank and ornery bulls – the kind that let ‘er rip and make cowboys flip. Out of more than 50 bull riders, only single digit numbers kept themselves dirt free for the mandated eight seconds. An 80-point ride by Josh Koschell on Saturday night earned the buckle for the weekend, but there were plenty of awe inspiring moments spread out over the rest of the performances, including Sunday afternoon’s double section of riders who all met arena sand up close and personal before the horn. It is safe to say a Burns bull doesn’t just toss a rider from its back and be done with him; it throws him off and proceeds to make sure the cowboy feels a need to run for his very life.

“I might be kind of old school, but I like those big and strong bucking bulls,” revealed Hal Burns after the rodeo’s finish. “I like the big, strong fifteen and sixteen hundred pound bulls.”

Asked his opinion regarding the Elizabeth venue, Burns was generous with compliments.

“Some places you get a little short of cowboys, but they come back to Elizabeth – they like to come to Elizabeth,” the big man stated with conviction. “The committee goes out of their way to take care of the contestants. That’s why we have world champions (and) NFR cowboys here. There’s just a lot of good people we work with, here,” Burns continued. “We try to give them a professional product and they run a professional rodeo and it works out good for both of us.”

Judging by the large ticket buying crowds and reaction from the rodeo’s president of the Board, it appears 2010’s product worked out good for everyone.

“It was our best rodeo ever (and) I think it was the best crowd we’ve ever had,” observed Almquist after the dust settled. “(The Elizabeth Stampede) started out with 10 guys deciding they were going to put on a rodeo and we’ve grown to about as big as you can get as a small rodeo. We are always trying to earn another Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo award,” he added with a laugh. “We want to be the best small rodeo of the United States.”

If they don’t win Best Small Rodeo of the Year for the whole rodeo country, this year’s edition sure looks good for Mountain States Circuit award number nine.