Elizabeth Stampede starts summer fireworks early | TheFencePost.com

Elizabeth Stampede starts summer fireworks early

Fireworks and celebrations are supposed to take place in July, but it appeared the memo never made it to anyone associated with the 2011 Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo. Record turnouts of crowds and contestants over the weekend of June 3-5 started the busy summer rodeo season off with a bang, sending out 300 plus contestants in front of approximately 7,400 rowdy fans to battle it out for a purse totaling almost $45,000 in the small town event. The explosive combination suited Stampede officials just fine.

“Oh, we’re having a wonderful year,” said Elizabeth Stampede President Norm Almquist before the start of Sunday afternoon’s last performance. “We were close to a sell-out on Friday night (PBR action) and we had standing room only on Saturday night. We were probably the biggest Saturday afternoon (crowd) we’ve ever had, so it’s been really good.”

On top of skyrocketing attendance, the venue sparkled with red, white and blue on its final sun-filled afternoon. For the last five years, the Elizabeth Stampede showed off its American spirit by honoring the military and local veterans with special services before and during Sunday’s performance, which they title the Red, White and Blue Rodeo. From special flag drills centered on Old Glory to honoring veterans and their families inside the arena to emotion-filled empty saddle ceremonies, the patriotic tradition has become important to the entire event.

“We do it for the military,” described Almquist of paying tribute to the armed forces, veterans and fallen soldiers on Sunday. “It’s to remind people that we’re here having fun and there are other people that are allowing us to have fun. So we’re doing our part to remind the community that we’re in support of (our military). We appreciate what they’ve done for us.”

With all that red, white and blue in sight, it was only fitting the pyrotechnics started early and often. Every crack of a gate signaled sky-high action as Burns Rodeo Company roughstock (combined this year with Hal Burns bulls and JD Hamaker broncs) discharged everything they had in eight-second battles against top-flight cowboys, while ropers, steer wrestlers and barrel racers put on a dazzling show of their own. Out of the seven rodeo events, four of the highest scores and best times came from the Sunday performance alone. All that good competition coupled with big crowds were a few reasons the region’s best contestants showed up just like they did every year.

“Elizabeth always seems to bring in a lot of people,” praised Seth Glause, a bull rider and saddle bronc competitor from Wyoming. “It’s in a good location for rodeo and people, so it’s very nice to see the stands filling up and have the people come support us. They just treat the cowboys well, there.”

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“I was really impressed with the way that committee has made that rodeo work and how much it has grown,” offered Colorado bareback rider Royce Ford, who tied for fifth place in the bareback event. “They’ve jumped way up and stepped up with the added money. Right now, they’d have my vote for the small outdoor rodeo of the year in the Mountain States Circuit, just they way they treat the contestants so well and stuff.”

Asked concerning the record amount of participants signing up for the rodeo, which culminated in two sections of action for every roughstock event on Sunday, both cowboys were positive about the stiff competition.

“It’s nice,” said Glause with enthusiasm. “The better the competition, the harder you try and the more you want to win.”

“We showed up and there was Jessy Davis and Bo Casper; there were NFR bareback riders all over,” described Ford regarding Sunday’s volume of talent. “I said, ‘Hey, you guys need to get out of my circuit so I can win something,'” he added with a laugh.

That skill level was on full display Sunday, as the bareback contest saw a pair of 80 plus scores, saddle bronc riders tossed in 80 plus and high 70s, steer wrestlers threw down some 5 second gauntlets, tie-down ropers wrapped up a few 10 second and faster finishes, team ropers blew away the field by lassoing all five top spots and barrel racing wowed the crowd with a first place finisher stopping the timers almost a full quarter of a second faster than the rest.

As if those athletic feats weren’t enough, the big guns of Burns Rodeo Company bulls were on hand to fire up their own version of an afternoon grand finale. Despite just a pair of cowboys notching a successful ride, the fans weren’t disappointed in the big-time action. Hal burns bulls are known throughout the rodeo industry as some of the toughest animals going, and the experienced stock contractor brought another load of impressive beasts to Elizabeth.

“Hal always has great bulls,” said Glause, who entered both the saddle bronc and bull riding sections on Sunday. “Hal takes them bulls and bucks them no matter what. Usually you know you’re going to have a good one when you show up to one of Hal’s rodeos and that is commendable on his part.”

Discussing the penchant for those bulls not only to get a cowboy off their backs, but also to take out their orneriness on everything and anyone inside the arena, Glause shared his own thoughts of being up close and personal with a Burns bull.

“It’s true,” he confessed with a laugh. “A lot of them dang sure have an attitude. You dang sure don’t want to be laying around the arena.”

Nobody lays around the arena at the Elizabeth Stampede, since drawing the region’s best cowboys and cowgirls is something local rodeo officials never take for granted. Winning the title of “Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo” a whopping eight times, hundreds of volunteers from the community pull together every year to make it a venue every contestant wants to revisit.

“We’re very, very proud (of all the top competitors here) and it means a lot to us,” said Almquist with a smile. “We try to get them to come back and we try to do things for the cowboys and cowgirls so they want to come back and compete. That’s part of our plan.”

Another part of their plan is to stage an event the fans will remember and 2011 was no different.

“We had a great weekend,” enthused Almquist immediately after the last performance. “We had good crowds (and) great volunteers. It was perfect,” he summed up with a smile. “You couldn’t ask for anything better.”

That makes it official. As of June 3-5, the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo shot the first crowd-pleaser of the summer fireworks season.

Fireworks and celebrations are supposed to take place in July, but it appeared the memo never made it to anyone associated with the 2011 Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo. Record turnouts of crowds and contestants over the weekend of June 3-5 started the busy summer rodeo season off with a bang, sending out 300 plus contestants in front of approximately 7,400 rowdy fans to battle it out for a purse totaling almost $45,000 in the small town event. The explosive combination suited Stampede officials just fine.

“Oh, we’re having a wonderful year,” said Elizabeth Stampede President Norm Almquist before the start of Sunday afternoon’s last performance. “We were close to a sell-out on Friday night (PBR action) and we had standing room only on Saturday night. We were probably the biggest Saturday afternoon (crowd) we’ve ever had, so it’s been really good.”

On top of skyrocketing attendance, the venue sparkled with red, white and blue on its final sun-filled afternoon. For the last five years, the Elizabeth Stampede showed off its American spirit by honoring the military and local veterans with special services before and during Sunday’s performance, which they title the Red, White and Blue Rodeo. From special flag drills centered on Old Glory to honoring veterans and their families inside the arena to emotion-filled empty saddle ceremonies, the patriotic tradition has become important to the entire event.

“We do it for the military,” described Almquist of paying tribute to the armed forces, veterans and fallen soldiers on Sunday. “It’s to remind people that we’re here having fun and there are other people that are allowing us to have fun. So we’re doing our part to remind the community that we’re in support of (our military). We appreciate what they’ve done for us.”

With all that red, white and blue in sight, it was only fitting the pyrotechnics started early and often. Every crack of a gate signaled sky-high action as Burns Rodeo Company roughstock (combined this year with Hal Burns bulls and JD Hamaker broncs) discharged everything they had in eight-second battles against top-flight cowboys, while ropers, steer wrestlers and barrel racers put on a dazzling show of their own. Out of the seven rodeo events, four of the highest scores and best times came from the Sunday performance alone. All that good competition coupled with big crowds were a few reasons the region’s best contestants showed up just like they did every year.

“Elizabeth always seems to bring in a lot of people,” praised Seth Glause, a bull rider and saddle bronc competitor from Wyoming. “It’s in a good location for rodeo and people, so it’s very nice to see the stands filling up and have the people come support us. They just treat the cowboys well, there.”

“I was really impressed with the way that committee has made that rodeo work and how much it has grown,” offered Colorado bareback rider Royce Ford, who tied for fifth place in the bareback event. “They’ve jumped way up and stepped up with the added money. Right now, they’d have my vote for the small outdoor rodeo of the year in the Mountain States Circuit, just they way they treat the contestants so well and stuff.”

Asked concerning the record amount of participants signing up for the rodeo, which culminated in two sections of action for every roughstock event on Sunday, both cowboys were positive about the stiff competition.

“It’s nice,” said Glause with enthusiasm. “The better the competition, the harder you try and the more you want to win.”

“We showed up and there was Jessy Davis and Bo Casper; there were NFR bareback riders all over,” described Ford regarding Sunday’s volume of talent. “I said, ‘Hey, you guys need to get out of my circuit so I can win something,'” he added with a laugh.

That skill level was on full display Sunday, as the bareback contest saw a pair of 80 plus scores, saddle bronc riders tossed in 80 plus and high 70s, steer wrestlers threw down some 5 second gauntlets, tie-down ropers wrapped up a few 10 second and faster finishes, team ropers blew away the field by lassoing all five top spots and barrel racing wowed the crowd with a first place finisher stopping the timers almost a full quarter of a second faster than the rest.

As if those athletic feats weren’t enough, the big guns of Burns Rodeo Company bulls were on hand to fire up their own version of an afternoon grand finale. Despite just a pair of cowboys notching a successful ride, the fans weren’t disappointed in the big-time action. Hal burns bulls are known throughout the rodeo industry as some of the toughest animals going, and the experienced stock contractor brought another load of impressive beasts to Elizabeth.

“Hal always has great bulls,” said Glause, who entered both the saddle bronc and bull riding sections on Sunday. “Hal takes them bulls and bucks them no matter what. Usually you know you’re going to have a good one when you show up to one of Hal’s rodeos and that is commendable on his part.”

Discussing the penchant for those bulls not only to get a cowboy off their backs, but also to take out their orneriness on everything and anyone inside the arena, Glause shared his own thoughts of being up close and personal with a Burns bull.

“It’s true,” he confessed with a laugh. “A lot of them dang sure have an attitude. You dang sure don’t want to be laying around the arena.”

Nobody lays around the arena at the Elizabeth Stampede, since drawing the region’s best cowboys and cowgirls is something local rodeo officials never take for granted. Winning the title of “Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo” a whopping eight times, hundreds of volunteers from the community pull together every year to make it a venue every contestant wants to revisit.

“We’re very, very proud (of all the top competitors here) and it means a lot to us,” said Almquist with a smile. “We try to get them to come back and we try to do things for the cowboys and cowgirls so they want to come back and compete. That’s part of our plan.”

Another part of their plan is to stage an event the fans will remember and 2011 was no different.

“We had a great weekend,” enthused Almquist immediately after the last performance. “We had good crowds (and) great volunteers. It was perfect,” he summed up with a smile. “You couldn’t ask for anything better.”

That makes it official. As of June 3-5, the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo shot the first crowd-pleaser of the summer fireworks season.

Fireworks and celebrations are supposed to take place in July, but it appeared the memo never made it to anyone associated with the 2011 Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo. Record turnouts of crowds and contestants over the weekend of June 3-5 started the busy summer rodeo season off with a bang, sending out 300 plus contestants in front of approximately 7,400 rowdy fans to battle it out for a purse totaling almost $45,000 in the small town event. The explosive combination suited Stampede officials just fine.

“Oh, we’re having a wonderful year,” said Elizabeth Stampede President Norm Almquist before the start of Sunday afternoon’s last performance. “We were close to a sell-out on Friday night (PBR action) and we had standing room only on Saturday night. We were probably the biggest Saturday afternoon (crowd) we’ve ever had, so it’s been really good.”

On top of skyrocketing attendance, the venue sparkled with red, white and blue on its final sun-filled afternoon. For the last five years, the Elizabeth Stampede showed off its American spirit by honoring the military and local veterans with special services before and during Sunday’s performance, which they title the Red, White and Blue Rodeo. From special flag drills centered on Old Glory to honoring veterans and their families inside the arena to emotion-filled empty saddle ceremonies, the patriotic tradition has become important to the entire event.

“We do it for the military,” described Almquist of paying tribute to the armed forces, veterans and fallen soldiers on Sunday. “It’s to remind people that we’re here having fun and there are other people that are allowing us to have fun. So we’re doing our part to remind the community that we’re in support of (our military). We appreciate what they’ve done for us.”

With all that red, white and blue in sight, it was only fitting the pyrotechnics started early and often. Every crack of a gate signaled sky-high action as Burns Rodeo Company roughstock (combined this year with Hal Burns bulls and JD Hamaker broncs) discharged everything they had in eight-second battles against top-flight cowboys, while ropers, steer wrestlers and barrel racers put on a dazzling show of their own. Out of the seven rodeo events, four of the highest scores and best times came from the Sunday performance alone. All that good competition coupled with big crowds were a few reasons the region’s best contestants showed up just like they did every year.

“Elizabeth always seems to bring in a lot of people,” praised Seth Glause, a bull rider and saddle bronc competitor from Wyoming. “It’s in a good location for rodeo and people, so it’s very nice to see the stands filling up and have the people come support us. They just treat the cowboys well, there.”

“I was really impressed with the way that committee has made that rodeo work and how much it has grown,” offered Colorado bareback rider Royce Ford, who tied for fifth place in the bareback event. “They’ve jumped way up and stepped up with the added money. Right now, they’d have my vote for the small outdoor rodeo of the year in the Mountain States Circuit, just they way they treat the contestants so well and stuff.”

Asked concerning the record amount of participants signing up for the rodeo, which culminated in two sections of action for every roughstock event on Sunday, both cowboys were positive about the stiff competition.

“It’s nice,” said Glause with enthusiasm. “The better the competition, the harder you try and the more you want to win.”

“We showed up and there was Jessy Davis and Bo Casper; there were NFR bareback riders all over,” described Ford regarding Sunday’s volume of talent. “I said, ‘Hey, you guys need to get out of my circuit so I can win something,'” he added with a laugh.

That skill level was on full display Sunday, as the bareback contest saw a pair of 80 plus scores, saddle bronc riders tossed in 80 plus and high 70s, steer wrestlers threw down some 5 second gauntlets, tie-down ropers wrapped up a few 10 second and faster finishes, team ropers blew away the field by lassoing all five top spots and barrel racing wowed the crowd with a first place finisher stopping the timers almost a full quarter of a second faster than the rest.

As if those athletic feats weren’t enough, the big guns of Burns Rodeo Company bulls were on hand to fire up their own version of an afternoon grand finale. Despite just a pair of cowboys notching a successful ride, the fans weren’t disappointed in the big-time action. Hal burns bulls are known throughout the rodeo industry as some of the toughest animals going, and the experienced stock contractor brought another load of impressive beasts to Elizabeth.

“Hal always has great bulls,” said Glause, who entered both the saddle bronc and bull riding sections on Sunday. “Hal takes them bulls and bucks them no matter what. Usually you know you’re going to have a good one when you show up to one of Hal’s rodeos and that is commendable on his part.”

Discussing the penchant for those bulls not only to get a cowboy off their backs, but also to take out their orneriness on everything and anyone inside the arena, Glause shared his own thoughts of being up close and personal with a Burns bull.

“It’s true,” he confessed with a laugh. “A lot of them dang sure have an attitude. You dang sure don’t want to be laying around the arena.”

Nobody lays around the arena at the Elizabeth Stampede, since drawing the region’s best cowboys and cowgirls is something local rodeo officials never take for granted. Winning the title of “Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo” a whopping eight times, hundreds of volunteers from the community pull together every year to make it a venue every contestant wants to revisit.

“We’re very, very proud (of all the top competitors here) and it means a lot to us,” said Almquist with a smile. “We try to get them to come back and we try to do things for the cowboys and cowgirls so they want to come back and compete. That’s part of our plan.”

Another part of their plan is to stage an event the fans will remember and 2011 was no different.

“We had a great weekend,” enthused Almquist immediately after the last performance. “We had good crowds (and) great volunteers. It was perfect,” he summed up with a smile. “You couldn’t ask for anything better.”

That makes it official. As of June 3-5, the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo shot the first crowd-pleaser of the summer fireworks season.

Fireworks and celebrations are supposed to take place in July, but it appeared the memo never made it to anyone associated with the 2011 Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo. Record turnouts of crowds and contestants over the weekend of June 3-5 started the busy summer rodeo season off with a bang, sending out 300 plus contestants in front of approximately 7,400 rowdy fans to battle it out for a purse totaling almost $45,000 in the small town event. The explosive combination suited Stampede officials just fine.

“Oh, we’re having a wonderful year,” said Elizabeth Stampede President Norm Almquist before the start of Sunday afternoon’s last performance. “We were close to a sell-out on Friday night (PBR action) and we had standing room only on Saturday night. We were probably the biggest Saturday afternoon (crowd) we’ve ever had, so it’s been really good.”

On top of skyrocketing attendance, the venue sparkled with red, white and blue on its final sun-filled afternoon. For the last five years, the Elizabeth Stampede showed off its American spirit by honoring the military and local veterans with special services before and during Sunday’s performance, which they title the Red, White and Blue Rodeo. From special flag drills centered on Old Glory to honoring veterans and their families inside the arena to emotion-filled empty saddle ceremonies, the patriotic tradition has become important to the entire event.

“We do it for the military,” described Almquist of paying tribute to the armed forces, veterans and fallen soldiers on Sunday. “It’s to remind people that we’re here having fun and there are other people that are allowing us to have fun. So we’re doing our part to remind the community that we’re in support of (our military). We appreciate what they’ve done for us.”

With all that red, white and blue in sight, it was only fitting the pyrotechnics started early and often. Every crack of a gate signaled sky-high action as Burns Rodeo Company roughstock (combined this year with Hal Burns bulls and JD Hamaker broncs) discharged everything they had in eight-second battles against top-flight cowboys, while ropers, steer wrestlers and barrel racers put on a dazzling show of their own. Out of the seven rodeo events, four of the highest scores and best times came from the Sunday performance alone. All that good competition coupled with big crowds were a few reasons the region’s best contestants showed up just like they did every year.

“Elizabeth always seems to bring in a lot of people,” praised Seth Glause, a bull rider and saddle bronc competitor from Wyoming. “It’s in a good location for rodeo and people, so it’s very nice to see the stands filling up and have the people come support us. They just treat the cowboys well, there.”

“I was really impressed with the way that committee has made that rodeo work and how much it has grown,” offered Colorado bareback rider Royce Ford, who tied for fifth place in the bareback event. “They’ve jumped way up and stepped up with the added money. Right now, they’d have my vote for the small outdoor rodeo of the year in the Mountain States Circuit, just they way they treat the contestants so well and stuff.”

Asked concerning the record amount of participants signing up for the rodeo, which culminated in two sections of action for every roughstock event on Sunday, both cowboys were positive about the stiff competition.

“It’s nice,” said Glause with enthusiasm. “The better the competition, the harder you try and the more you want to win.”

“We showed up and there was Jessy Davis and Bo Casper; there were NFR bareback riders all over,” described Ford regarding Sunday’s volume of talent. “I said, ‘Hey, you guys need to get out of my circuit so I can win something,'” he added with a laugh.

That skill level was on full display Sunday, as the bareback contest saw a pair of 80 plus scores, saddle bronc riders tossed in 80 plus and high 70s, steer wrestlers threw down some 5 second gauntlets, tie-down ropers wrapped up a few 10 second and faster finishes, team ropers blew away the field by lassoing all five top spots and barrel racing wowed the crowd with a first place finisher stopping the timers almost a full quarter of a second faster than the rest.

As if those athletic feats weren’t enough, the big guns of Burns Rodeo Company bulls were on hand to fire up their own version of an afternoon grand finale. Despite just a pair of cowboys notching a successful ride, the fans weren’t disappointed in the big-time action. Hal burns bulls are known throughout the rodeo industry as some of the toughest animals going, and the experienced stock contractor brought another load of impressive beasts to Elizabeth.

“Hal always has great bulls,” said Glause, who entered both the saddle bronc and bull riding sections on Sunday. “Hal takes them bulls and bucks them no matter what. Usually you know you’re going to have a good one when you show up to one of Hal’s rodeos and that is commendable on his part.”

Discussing the penchant for those bulls not only to get a cowboy off their backs, but also to take out their orneriness on everything and anyone inside the arena, Glause shared his own thoughts of being up close and personal with a Burns bull.

“It’s true,” he confessed with a laugh. “A lot of them dang sure have an attitude. You dang sure don’t want to be laying around the arena.”

Nobody lays around the arena at the Elizabeth Stampede, since drawing the region’s best cowboys and cowgirls is something local rodeo officials never take for granted. Winning the title of “Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo” a whopping eight times, hundreds of volunteers from the community pull together every year to make it a venue every contestant wants to revisit.

“We’re very, very proud (of all the top competitors here) and it means a lot to us,” said Almquist with a smile. “We try to get them to come back and we try to do things for the cowboys and cowgirls so they want to come back and compete. That’s part of our plan.”

Another part of their plan is to stage an event the fans will remember and 2011 was no different.

“We had a great weekend,” enthused Almquist immediately after the last performance. “We had good crowds (and) great volunteers. It was perfect,” he summed up with a smile. “You couldn’t ask for anything better.”

That makes it official. As of June 3-5, the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo shot the first crowd-pleaser of the summer fireworks season.

Fireworks and celebrations are supposed to take place in July, but it appeared the memo never made it to anyone associated with the 2011 Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo. Record turnouts of crowds and contestants over the weekend of June 3-5 started the busy summer rodeo season off with a bang, sending out 300 plus contestants in front of approximately 7,400 rowdy fans to battle it out for a purse totaling almost $45,000 in the small town event. The explosive combination suited Stampede officials just fine.

“Oh, we’re having a wonderful year,” said Elizabeth Stampede President Norm Almquist before the start of Sunday afternoon’s last performance. “We were close to a sell-out on Friday night (PBR action) and we had standing room only on Saturday night. We were probably the biggest Saturday afternoon (crowd) we’ve ever had, so it’s been really good.”

On top of skyrocketing attendance, the venue sparkled with red, white and blue on its final sun-filled afternoon. For the last five years, the Elizabeth Stampede showed off its American spirit by honoring the military and local veterans with special services before and during Sunday’s performance, which they title the Red, White and Blue Rodeo. From special flag drills centered on Old Glory to honoring veterans and their families inside the arena to emotion-filled empty saddle ceremonies, the patriotic tradition has become important to the entire event.

“We do it for the military,” described Almquist of paying tribute to the armed forces, veterans and fallen soldiers on Sunday. “It’s to remind people that we’re here having fun and there are other people that are allowing us to have fun. So we’re doing our part to remind the community that we’re in support of (our military). We appreciate what they’ve done for us.”

With all that red, white and blue in sight, it was only fitting the pyrotechnics started early and often. Every crack of a gate signaled sky-high action as Burns Rodeo Company roughstock (combined this year with Hal Burns bulls and JD Hamaker broncs) discharged everything they had in eight-second battles against top-flight cowboys, while ropers, steer wrestlers and barrel racers put on a dazzling show of their own. Out of the seven rodeo events, four of the highest scores and best times came from the Sunday performance alone. All that good competition coupled with big crowds were a few reasons the region’s best contestants showed up just like they did every year.

“Elizabeth always seems to bring in a lot of people,” praised Seth Glause, a bull rider and saddle bronc competitor from Wyoming. “It’s in a good location for rodeo and people, so it’s very nice to see the stands filling up and have the people come support us. They just treat the cowboys well, there.”

“I was really impressed with the way that committee has made that rodeo work and how much it has grown,” offered Colorado bareback rider Royce Ford, who tied for fifth place in the bareback event. “They’ve jumped way up and stepped up with the added money. Right now, they’d have my vote for the small outdoor rodeo of the year in the Mountain States Circuit, just they way they treat the contestants so well and stuff.”

Asked concerning the record amount of participants signing up for the rodeo, which culminated in two sections of action for every roughstock event on Sunday, both cowboys were positive about the stiff competition.

“It’s nice,” said Glause with enthusiasm. “The better the competition, the harder you try and the more you want to win.”

“We showed up and there was Jessy Davis and Bo Casper; there were NFR bareback riders all over,” described Ford regarding Sunday’s volume of talent. “I said, ‘Hey, you guys need to get out of my circuit so I can win something,'” he added with a laugh.

That skill level was on full display Sunday, as the bareback contest saw a pair of 80 plus scores, saddle bronc riders tossed in 80 plus and high 70s, steer wrestlers threw down some 5 second gauntlets, tie-down ropers wrapped up a few 10 second and faster finishes, team ropers blew away the field by lassoing all five top spots and barrel racing wowed the crowd with a first place finisher stopping the timers almost a full quarter of a second faster than the rest.

As if those athletic feats weren’t enough, the big guns of Burns Rodeo Company bulls were on hand to fire up their own version of an afternoon grand finale. Despite just a pair of cowboys notching a successful ride, the fans weren’t disappointed in the big-time action. Hal burns bulls are known throughout the rodeo industry as some of the toughest animals going, and the experienced stock contractor brought another load of impressive beasts to Elizabeth.

“Hal always has great bulls,” said Glause, who entered both the saddle bronc and bull riding sections on Sunday. “Hal takes them bulls and bucks them no matter what. Usually you know you’re going to have a good one when you show up to one of Hal’s rodeos and that is commendable on his part.”

Discussing the penchant for those bulls not only to get a cowboy off their backs, but also to take out their orneriness on everything and anyone inside the arena, Glause shared his own thoughts of being up close and personal with a Burns bull.

“It’s true,” he confessed with a laugh. “A lot of them dang sure have an attitude. You dang sure don’t want to be laying around the arena.”

Nobody lays around the arena at the Elizabeth Stampede, since drawing the region’s best cowboys and cowgirls is something local rodeo officials never take for granted. Winning the title of “Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo” a whopping eight times, hundreds of volunteers from the community pull together every year to make it a venue every contestant wants to revisit.

“We’re very, very proud (of all the top competitors here) and it means a lot to us,” said Almquist with a smile. “We try to get them to come back and we try to do things for the cowboys and cowgirls so they want to come back and compete. That’s part of our plan.”

Another part of their plan is to stage an event the fans will remember and 2011 was no different.

“We had a great weekend,” enthused Almquist immediately after the last performance. “We had good crowds (and) great volunteers. It was perfect,” he summed up with a smile. “You couldn’t ask for anything better.”

That makes it official. As of June 3-5, the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo shot the first crowd-pleaser of the summer fireworks season.

Fireworks and celebrations are supposed to take place in July, but it appeared the memo never made it to anyone associated with the 2011 Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo. Record turnouts of crowds and contestants over the weekend of June 3-5 started the busy summer rodeo season off with a bang, sending out 300 plus contestants in front of approximately 7,400 rowdy fans to battle it out for a purse totaling almost $45,000 in the small town event. The explosive combination suited Stampede officials just fine.

“Oh, we’re having a wonderful year,” said Elizabeth Stampede President Norm Almquist before the start of Sunday afternoon’s last performance. “We were close to a sell-out on Friday night (PBR action) and we had standing room only on Saturday night. We were probably the biggest Saturday afternoon (crowd) we’ve ever had, so it’s been really good.”

On top of skyrocketing attendance, the venue sparkled with red, white and blue on its final sun-filled afternoon. For the last five years, the Elizabeth Stampede showed off its American spirit by honoring the military and local veterans with special services before and during Sunday’s performance, which they title the Red, White and Blue Rodeo. From special flag drills centered on Old Glory to honoring veterans and their families inside the arena to emotion-filled empty saddle ceremonies, the patriotic tradition has become important to the entire event.

“We do it for the military,” described Almquist of paying tribute to the armed forces, veterans and fallen soldiers on Sunday. “It’s to remind people that we’re here having fun and there are other people that are allowing us to have fun. So we’re doing our part to remind the community that we’re in support of (our military). We appreciate what they’ve done for us.”

With all that red, white and blue in sight, it was only fitting the pyrotechnics started early and often. Every crack of a gate signaled sky-high action as Burns Rodeo Company roughstock (combined this year with Hal Burns bulls and JD Hamaker broncs) discharged everything they had in eight-second battles against top-flight cowboys, while ropers, steer wrestlers and barrel racers put on a dazzling show of their own. Out of the seven rodeo events, four of the highest scores and best times came from the Sunday performance alone. All that good competition coupled with big crowds were a few reasons the region’s best contestants showed up just like they did every year.

“Elizabeth always seems to bring in a lot of people,” praised Seth Glause, a bull rider and saddle bronc competitor from Wyoming. “It’s in a good location for rodeo and people, so it’s very nice to see the stands filling up and have the people come support us. They just treat the cowboys well, there.”

“I was really impressed with the way that committee has made that rodeo work and how much it has grown,” offered Colorado bareback rider Royce Ford, who tied for fifth place in the bareback event. “They’ve jumped way up and stepped up with the added money. Right now, they’d have my vote for the small outdoor rodeo of the year in the Mountain States Circuit, just they way they treat the contestants so well and stuff.”

Asked concerning the record amount of participants signing up for the rodeo, which culminated in two sections of action for every roughstock event on Sunday, both cowboys were positive about the stiff competition.

“It’s nice,” said Glause with enthusiasm. “The better the competition, the harder you try and the more you want to win.”

“We showed up and there was Jessy Davis and Bo Casper; there were NFR bareback riders all over,” described Ford regarding Sunday’s volume of talent. “I said, ‘Hey, you guys need to get out of my circuit so I can win something,'” he added with a laugh.

That skill level was on full display Sunday, as the bareback contest saw a pair of 80 plus scores, saddle bronc riders tossed in 80 plus and high 70s, steer wrestlers threw down some 5 second gauntlets, tie-down ropers wrapped up a few 10 second and faster finishes, team ropers blew away the field by lassoing all five top spots and barrel racing wowed the crowd with a first place finisher stopping the timers almost a full quarter of a second faster than the rest.

As if those athletic feats weren’t enough, the big guns of Burns Rodeo Company bulls were on hand to fire up their own version of an afternoon grand finale. Despite just a pair of cowboys notching a successful ride, the fans weren’t disappointed in the big-time action. Hal burns bulls are known throughout the rodeo industry as some of the toughest animals going, and the experienced stock contractor brought another load of impressive beasts to Elizabeth.

“Hal always has great bulls,” said Glause, who entered both the saddle bronc and bull riding sections on Sunday. “Hal takes them bulls and bucks them no matter what. Usually you know you’re going to have a good one when you show up to one of Hal’s rodeos and that is commendable on his part.”

Discussing the penchant for those bulls not only to get a cowboy off their backs, but also to take out their orneriness on everything and anyone inside the arena, Glause shared his own thoughts of being up close and personal with a Burns bull.

“It’s true,” he confessed with a laugh. “A lot of them dang sure have an attitude. You dang sure don’t want to be laying around the arena.”

Nobody lays around the arena at the Elizabeth Stampede, since drawing the region’s best cowboys and cowgirls is something local rodeo officials never take for granted. Winning the title of “Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo” a whopping eight times, hundreds of volunteers from the community pull together every year to make it a venue every contestant wants to revisit.

“We’re very, very proud (of all the top competitors here) and it means a lot to us,” said Almquist with a smile. “We try to get them to come back and we try to do things for the cowboys and cowgirls so they want to come back and compete. That’s part of our plan.”

Another part of their plan is to stage an event the fans will remember and 2011 was no different.

“We had a great weekend,” enthused Almquist immediately after the last performance. “We had good crowds (and) great volunteers. It was perfect,” he summed up with a smile. “You couldn’t ask for anything better.”

That makes it official. As of June 3-5, the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo shot the first crowd-pleaser of the summer fireworks season.

Fireworks and celebrations are supposed to take place in July, but it appeared the memo never made it to anyone associated with the 2011 Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo. Record turnouts of crowds and contestants over the weekend of June 3-5 started the busy summer rodeo season off with a bang, sending out 300 plus contestants in front of approximately 7,400 rowdy fans to battle it out for a purse totaling almost $45,000 in the small town event. The explosive combination suited Stampede officials just fine.

“Oh, we’re having a wonderful year,” said Elizabeth Stampede President Norm Almquist before the start of Sunday afternoon’s last performance. “We were close to a sell-out on Friday night (PBR action) and we had standing room only on Saturday night. We were probably the biggest Saturday afternoon (crowd) we’ve ever had, so it’s been really good.”

On top of skyrocketing attendance, the venue sparkled with red, white and blue on its final sun-filled afternoon. For the last five years, the Elizabeth Stampede showed off its American spirit by honoring the military and local veterans with special services before and during Sunday’s performance, which they title the Red, White and Blue Rodeo. From special flag drills centered on Old Glory to honoring veterans and their families inside the arena to emotion-filled empty saddle ceremonies, the patriotic tradition has become important to the entire event.

“We do it for the military,” described Almquist of paying tribute to the armed forces, veterans and fallen soldiers on Sunday. “It’s to remind people that we’re here having fun and there are other people that are allowing us to have fun. So we’re doing our part to remind the community that we’re in support of (our military). We appreciate what they’ve done for us.”

With all that red, white and blue in sight, it was only fitting the pyrotechnics started early and often. Every crack of a gate signaled sky-high action as Burns Rodeo Company roughstock (combined this year with Hal Burns bulls and JD Hamaker broncs) discharged everything they had in eight-second battles against top-flight cowboys, while ropers, steer wrestlers and barrel racers put on a dazzling show of their own. Out of the seven rodeo events, four of the highest scores and best times came from the Sunday performance alone. All that good competition coupled with big crowds were a few reasons the region’s best contestants showed up just like they did every year.

“Elizabeth always seems to bring in a lot of people,” praised Seth Glause, a bull rider and saddle bronc competitor from Wyoming. “It’s in a good location for rodeo and people, so it’s very nice to see the stands filling up and have the people come support us. They just treat the cowboys well, there.”

“I was really impressed with the way that committee has made that rodeo work and how much it has grown,” offered Colorado bareback rider Royce Ford, who tied for fifth place in the bareback event. “They’ve jumped way up and stepped up with the added money. Right now, they’d have my vote for the small outdoor rodeo of the year in the Mountain States Circuit, just they way they treat the contestants so well and stuff.”

Asked concerning the record amount of participants signing up for the rodeo, which culminated in two sections of action for every roughstock event on Sunday, both cowboys were positive about the stiff competition.

“It’s nice,” said Glause with enthusiasm. “The better the competition, the harder you try and the more you want to win.”

“We showed up and there was Jessy Davis and Bo Casper; there were NFR bareback riders all over,” described Ford regarding Sunday’s volume of talent. “I said, ‘Hey, you guys need to get out of my circuit so I can win something,'” he added with a laugh.

That skill level was on full display Sunday, as the bareback contest saw a pair of 80 plus scores, saddle bronc riders tossed in 80 plus and high 70s, steer wrestlers threw down some 5 second gauntlets, tie-down ropers wrapped up a few 10 second and faster finishes, team ropers blew away the field by lassoing all five top spots and barrel racing wowed the crowd with a first place finisher stopping the timers almost a full quarter of a second faster than the rest.

As if those athletic feats weren’t enough, the big guns of Burns Rodeo Company bulls were on hand to fire up their own version of an afternoon grand finale. Despite just a pair of cowboys notching a successful ride, the fans weren’t disappointed in the big-time action. Hal burns bulls are known throughout the rodeo industry as some of the toughest animals going, and the experienced stock contractor brought another load of impressive beasts to Elizabeth.

“Hal always has great bulls,” said Glause, who entered both the saddle bronc and bull riding sections on Sunday. “Hal takes them bulls and bucks them no matter what. Usually you know you’re going to have a good one when you show up to one of Hal’s rodeos and that is commendable on his part.”

Discussing the penchant for those bulls not only to get a cowboy off their backs, but also to take out their orneriness on everything and anyone inside the arena, Glause shared his own thoughts of being up close and personal with a Burns bull.

“It’s true,” he confessed with a laugh. “A lot of them dang sure have an attitude. You dang sure don’t want to be laying around the arena.”

Nobody lays around the arena at the Elizabeth Stampede, since drawing the region’s best cowboys and cowgirls is something local rodeo officials never take for granted. Winning the title of “Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo” a whopping eight times, hundreds of volunteers from the community pull together every year to make it a venue every contestant wants to revisit.

“We’re very, very proud (of all the top competitors here) and it means a lot to us,” said Almquist with a smile. “We try to get them to come back and we try to do things for the cowboys and cowgirls so they want to come back and compete. That’s part of our plan.”

Another part of their plan is to stage an event the fans will remember and 2011 was no different.

“We had a great weekend,” enthused Almquist immediately after the last performance. “We had good crowds (and) great volunteers. It was perfect,” he summed up with a smile. “You couldn’t ask for anything better.”

That makes it official. As of June 3-5, the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo shot the first crowd-pleaser of the summer fireworks season.

Fireworks and celebrations are supposed to take place in July, but it appeared the memo never made it to anyone associated with the 2011 Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo. Record turnouts of crowds and contestants over the weekend of June 3-5 started the busy summer rodeo season off with a bang, sending out 300 plus contestants in front of approximately 7,400 rowdy fans to battle it out for a purse totaling almost $45,000 in the small town event. The explosive combination suited Stampede officials just fine.

“Oh, we’re having a wonderful year,” said Elizabeth Stampede President Norm Almquist before the start of Sunday afternoon’s last performance. “We were close to a sell-out on Friday night (PBR action) and we had standing room only on Saturday night. We were probably the biggest Saturday afternoon (crowd) we’ve ever had, so it’s been really good.”

On top of skyrocketing attendance, the venue sparkled with red, white and blue on its final sun-filled afternoon. For the last five years, the Elizabeth Stampede showed off its American spirit by honoring the military and local veterans with special services before and during Sunday’s performance, which they title the Red, White and Blue Rodeo. From special flag drills centered on Old Glory to honoring veterans and their families inside the arena to emotion-filled empty saddle ceremonies, the patriotic tradition has become important to the entire event.

“We do it for the military,” described Almquist of paying tribute to the armed forces, veterans and fallen soldiers on Sunday. “It’s to remind people that we’re here having fun and there are other people that are allowing us to have fun. So we’re doing our part to remind the community that we’re in support of (our military). We appreciate what they’ve done for us.”

With all that red, white and blue in sight, it was only fitting the pyrotechnics started early and often. Every crack of a gate signaled sky-high action as Burns Rodeo Company roughstock (combined this year with Hal Burns bulls and JD Hamaker broncs) discharged everything they had in eight-second battles against top-flight cowboys, while ropers, steer wrestlers and barrel racers put on a dazzling show of their own. Out of the seven rodeo events, four of the highest scores and best times came from the Sunday performance alone. All that good competition coupled with big crowds were a few reasons the region’s best contestants showed up just like they did every year.

“Elizabeth always seems to bring in a lot of people,” praised Seth Glause, a bull rider and saddle bronc competitor from Wyoming. “It’s in a good location for rodeo and people, so it’s very nice to see the stands filling up and have the people come support us. They just treat the cowboys well, there.”

“I was really impressed with the way that committee has made that rodeo work and how much it has grown,” offered Colorado bareback rider Royce Ford, who tied for fifth place in the bareback event. “They’ve jumped way up and stepped up with the added money. Right now, they’d have my vote for the small outdoor rodeo of the year in the Mountain States Circuit, just they way they treat the contestants so well and stuff.”

Asked concerning the record amount of participants signing up for the rodeo, which culminated in two sections of action for every roughstock event on Sunday, both cowboys were positive about the stiff competition.

“It’s nice,” said Glause with enthusiasm. “The better the competition, the harder you try and the more you want to win.”

“We showed up and there was Jessy Davis and Bo Casper; there were NFR bareback riders all over,” described Ford regarding Sunday’s volume of talent. “I said, ‘Hey, you guys need to get out of my circuit so I can win something,'” he added with a laugh.

That skill level was on full display Sunday, as the bareback contest saw a pair of 80 plus scores, saddle bronc riders tossed in 80 plus and high 70s, steer wrestlers threw down some 5 second gauntlets, tie-down ropers wrapped up a few 10 second and faster finishes, team ropers blew away the field by lassoing all five top spots and barrel racing wowed the crowd with a first place finisher stopping the timers almost a full quarter of a second faster than the rest.

As if those athletic feats weren’t enough, the big guns of Burns Rodeo Company bulls were on hand to fire up their own version of an afternoon grand finale. Despite just a pair of cowboys notching a successful ride, the fans weren’t disappointed in the big-time action. Hal burns bulls are known throughout the rodeo industry as some of the toughest animals going, and the experienced stock contractor brought another load of impressive beasts to Elizabeth.

“Hal always has great bulls,” said Glause, who entered both the saddle bronc and bull riding sections on Sunday. “Hal takes them bulls and bucks them no matter what. Usually you know you’re going to have a good one when you show up to one of Hal’s rodeos and that is commendable on his part.”

Discussing the penchant for those bulls not only to get a cowboy off their backs, but also to take out their orneriness on everything and anyone inside the arena, Glause shared his own thoughts of being up close and personal with a Burns bull.

“It’s true,” he confessed with a laugh. “A lot of them dang sure have an attitude. You dang sure don’t want to be laying around the arena.”

Nobody lays around the arena at the Elizabeth Stampede, since drawing the region’s best cowboys and cowgirls is something local rodeo officials never take for granted. Winning the title of “Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo” a whopping eight times, hundreds of volunteers from the community pull together every year to make it a venue every contestant wants to revisit.

“We’re very, very proud (of all the top competitors here) and it means a lot to us,” said Almquist with a smile. “We try to get them to come back and we try to do things for the cowboys and cowgirls so they want to come back and compete. That’s part of our plan.”

Another part of their plan is to stage an event the fans will remember and 2011 was no different.

“We had a great weekend,” enthused Almquist immediately after the last performance. “We had good crowds (and) great volunteers. It was perfect,” he summed up with a smile. “You couldn’t ask for anything better.”

That makes it official. As of June 3-5, the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo shot the first crowd-pleaser of the summer fireworks season.

Fireworks and celebrations are supposed to take place in July, but it appeared the memo never made it to anyone associated with the 2011 Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo. Record turnouts of crowds and contestants over the weekend of June 3-5 started the busy summer rodeo season off with a bang, sending out 300 plus contestants in front of approximately 7,400 rowdy fans to battle it out for a purse totaling almost $45,000 in the small town event. The explosive combination suited Stampede officials just fine.

“Oh, we’re having a wonderful year,” said Elizabeth Stampede President Norm Almquist before the start of Sunday afternoon’s last performance. “We were close to a sell-out on Friday night (PBR action) and we had standing room only on Saturday night. We were probably the biggest Saturday afternoon (crowd) we’ve ever had, so it’s been really good.”

On top of skyrocketing attendance, the venue sparkled with red, white and blue on its final sun-filled afternoon. For the last five years, the Elizabeth Stampede showed off its American spirit by honoring the military and local veterans with special services before and during Sunday’s performance, which they title the Red, White and Blue Rodeo. From special flag drills centered on Old Glory to honoring veterans and their families inside the arena to emotion-filled empty saddle ceremonies, the patriotic tradition has become important to the entire event.

“We do it for the military,” described Almquist of paying tribute to the armed forces, veterans and fallen soldiers on Sunday. “It’s to remind people that we’re here having fun and there are other people that are allowing us to have fun. So we’re doing our part to remind the community that we’re in support of (our military). We appreciate what they’ve done for us.”

With all that red, white and blue in sight, it was only fitting the pyrotechnics started early and often. Every crack of a gate signaled sky-high action as Burns Rodeo Company roughstock (combined this year with Hal Burns bulls and JD Hamaker broncs) discharged everything they had in eight-second battles against top-flight cowboys, while ropers, steer wrestlers and barrel racers put on a dazzling show of their own. Out of the seven rodeo events, four of the highest scores and best times came from the Sunday performance alone. All that good competition coupled with big crowds were a few reasons the region’s best contestants showed up just like they did every year.

“Elizabeth always seems to bring in a lot of people,” praised Seth Glause, a bull rider and saddle bronc competitor from Wyoming. “It’s in a good location for rodeo and people, so it’s very nice to see the stands filling up and have the people come support us. They just treat the cowboys well, there.”

“I was really impressed with the way that committee has made that rodeo work and how much it has grown,” offered Colorado bareback rider Royce Ford, who tied for fifth place in the bareback event. “They’ve jumped way up and stepped up with the added money. Right now, they’d have my vote for the small outdoor rodeo of the year in the Mountain States Circuit, just they way they treat the contestants so well and stuff.”

Asked concerning the record amount of participants signing up for the rodeo, which culminated in two sections of action for every roughstock event on Sunday, both cowboys were positive about the stiff competition.

“It’s nice,” said Glause with enthusiasm. “The better the competition, the harder you try and the more you want to win.”

“We showed up and there was Jessy Davis and Bo Casper; there were NFR bareback riders all over,” described Ford regarding Sunday’s volume of talent. “I said, ‘Hey, you guys need to get out of my circuit so I can win something,'” he added with a laugh.

That skill level was on full display Sunday, as the bareback contest saw a pair of 80 plus scores, saddle bronc riders tossed in 80 plus and high 70s, steer wrestlers threw down some 5 second gauntlets, tie-down ropers wrapped up a few 10 second and faster finishes, team ropers blew away the field by lassoing all five top spots and barrel racing wowed the crowd with a first place finisher stopping the timers almost a full quarter of a second faster than the rest.

As if those athletic feats weren’t enough, the big guns of Burns Rodeo Company bulls were on hand to fire up their own version of an afternoon grand finale. Despite just a pair of cowboys notching a successful ride, the fans weren’t disappointed in the big-time action. Hal burns bulls are known throughout the rodeo industry as some of the toughest animals going, and the experienced stock contractor brought another load of impressive beasts to Elizabeth.

“Hal always has great bulls,” said Glause, who entered both the saddle bronc and bull riding sections on Sunday. “Hal takes them bulls and bucks them no matter what. Usually you know you’re going to have a good one when you show up to one of Hal’s rodeos and that is commendable on his part.”

Discussing the penchant for those bulls not only to get a cowboy off their backs, but also to take out their orneriness on everything and anyone inside the arena, Glause shared his own thoughts of being up close and personal with a Burns bull.

“It’s true,” he confessed with a laugh. “A lot of them dang sure have an attitude. You dang sure don’t want to be laying around the arena.”

Nobody lays around the arena at the Elizabeth Stampede, since drawing the region’s best cowboys and cowgirls is something local rodeo officials never take for granted. Winning the title of “Mountain States Circuit Best Small Rodeo” a whopping eight times, hundreds of volunteers from the community pull together every year to make it a venue every contestant wants to revisit.

“We’re very, very proud (of all the top competitors here) and it means a lot to us,” said Almquist with a smile. “We try to get them to come back and we try to do things for the cowboys and cowgirls so they want to come back and compete. That’s part of our plan.”

Another part of their plan is to stage an event the fans will remember and 2011 was no different.

“We had a great weekend,” enthused Almquist immediately after the last performance. “We had good crowds (and) great volunteers. It was perfect,” he summed up with a smile. “You couldn’t ask for anything better.”

That makes it official. As of June 3-5, the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo shot the first crowd-pleaser of the summer fireworks season.