Excellent Turn-out for the 2010 Four States Ag Expo in Cortez, Colo. | TheFencePost.com

Excellent Turn-out for the 2010 Four States Ag Expo in Cortez, Colo.

Tony Bruguiere Ft. Collins, Colo.

Tony BruguiereAfter some tough competition in the Ranch Sorting, Ethan Kremer (R) and his friend get down to some serious 'little boy play' with dirt moving toys.

There was still snow on the ground and a little windy and cool, but there was plenty of sunshine and the thousands of visitors to the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Colo., did not seem to mind the weather. For 28 years, local farmers and ranchers from the Four Corners Region of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah have come to Cortez to get the latest information on agricultural techniques, equipment, products and services.

The format of the Four States Agricultural Expo is centered around education with seminars, clinics and demonstrations. There is plenty of youth participation from 4-H and FFA groups. In 2008 the Ag Expo decided to increase the participation of equine clinics, presenters, and events and this year a very popular bull sale was added.

The Four States Agricultural Expo bills itself as the “Largest Farm and Ranch Show in the West” and it certainly lived up to its billing. There were plenty of exhibitors and presentations inside the large Main Pavilion and there were draft horse parades, team sorting contests, farm equipment demonstrations, pony rides and food vendors outside.

One of the most popular events was the Ranch Sorting competition. Ranch Sorting is similar to team penning, but it is much more closely associated with the way that cowboys work in real life. It does not require as much space and, as one of the contestants put it, Ranch Sorting is easier on the cattle because it does not have the “ram and jam” of team penning.

Ranch Sorting is an event that the whole family can participate in. In Ranch Sorting, there is a system similar to the skill level handicapping found in team roping associations, which allowed 5-year-old Ethan Kremer from Bayfield, Color., not only to compete but to do very well.

Draft horses are always a featured attraction at the Four States Agricultural Expo. This year they ranged in size at the Expo from a large team of six Belgian mares down to the smallest draft team of Sampson and Lolly, two miniature horses from New Mexico. The draft teams were available outside for Expo patrons to interact with and once a day they were hitched up for a draft horse parade that went through the fairgrounds.

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There were also plenty of displays of mechanized horse power ranging in size from tractors that would fit nicely in a backyard to full size combines. Besides the latest and greatest equipment from Kubota, Cat and Case, there was also a very nice display of antique tractors.

Sheep raising is very prevalent in the southwest and the Four States Agricultural Expo had renowned trainer Jack Knox presenting stock dog training clinics each day during the four day run of the Expo.

Recently, a number of factors have combined to raise the problem of unwanted horses to new levels. Horse trainer Jason Patrick of the Whispering Willows Ranch in Colorado, is working with horse rescue organizations across the country to put on horse starting clinics. At the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Patrick joined with the Four Corners, Fresh Start, and Spring Creek Horse Rescues to present a colt starting clinic each day.

At 28 the Four States Agricultural Expo is just getting started. Over the years it has changed and adapted to the agricultural needs of the farmers and ranchers of the area. It gets bigger and better every year and 2011 is expected to be even better.

There was still snow on the ground and a little windy and cool, but there was plenty of sunshine and the thousands of visitors to the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Colo., did not seem to mind the weather. For 28 years, local farmers and ranchers from the Four Corners Region of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah have come to Cortez to get the latest information on agricultural techniques, equipment, products and services.

The format of the Four States Agricultural Expo is centered around education with seminars, clinics and demonstrations. There is plenty of youth participation from 4-H and FFA groups. In 2008 the Ag Expo decided to increase the participation of equine clinics, presenters, and events and this year a very popular bull sale was added.

The Four States Agricultural Expo bills itself as the “Largest Farm and Ranch Show in the West” and it certainly lived up to its billing. There were plenty of exhibitors and presentations inside the large Main Pavilion and there were draft horse parades, team sorting contests, farm equipment demonstrations, pony rides and food vendors outside.

One of the most popular events was the Ranch Sorting competition. Ranch Sorting is similar to team penning, but it is much more closely associated with the way that cowboys work in real life. It does not require as much space and, as one of the contestants put it, Ranch Sorting is easier on the cattle because it does not have the “ram and jam” of team penning.

Ranch Sorting is an event that the whole family can participate in. In Ranch Sorting, there is a system similar to the skill level handicapping found in team roping associations, which allowed 5-year-old Ethan Kremer from Bayfield, Color., not only to compete but to do very well.

Draft horses are always a featured attraction at the Four States Agricultural Expo. This year they ranged in size at the Expo from a large team of six Belgian mares down to the smallest draft team of Sampson and Lolly, two miniature horses from New Mexico. The draft teams were available outside for Expo patrons to interact with and once a day they were hitched up for a draft horse parade that went through the fairgrounds.

There were also plenty of displays of mechanized horse power ranging in size from tractors that would fit nicely in a backyard to full size combines. Besides the latest and greatest equipment from Kubota, Cat and Case, there was also a very nice display of antique tractors.

Sheep raising is very prevalent in the southwest and the Four States Agricultural Expo had renowned trainer Jack Knox presenting stock dog training clinics each day during the four day run of the Expo.

Recently, a number of factors have combined to raise the problem of unwanted horses to new levels. Horse trainer Jason Patrick of the Whispering Willows Ranch in Colorado, is working with horse rescue organizations across the country to put on horse starting clinics. At the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Patrick joined with the Four Corners, Fresh Start, and Spring Creek Horse Rescues to present a colt starting clinic each day.

At 28 the Four States Agricultural Expo is just getting started. Over the years it has changed and adapted to the agricultural needs of the farmers and ranchers of the area. It gets bigger and better every year and 2011 is expected to be even better.

There was still snow on the ground and a little windy and cool, but there was plenty of sunshine and the thousands of visitors to the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Colo., did not seem to mind the weather. For 28 years, local farmers and ranchers from the Four Corners Region of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah have come to Cortez to get the latest information on agricultural techniques, equipment, products and services.

The format of the Four States Agricultural Expo is centered around education with seminars, clinics and demonstrations. There is plenty of youth participation from 4-H and FFA groups. In 2008 the Ag Expo decided to increase the participation of equine clinics, presenters, and events and this year a very popular bull sale was added.

The Four States Agricultural Expo bills itself as the “Largest Farm and Ranch Show in the West” and it certainly lived up to its billing. There were plenty of exhibitors and presentations inside the large Main Pavilion and there were draft horse parades, team sorting contests, farm equipment demonstrations, pony rides and food vendors outside.

One of the most popular events was the Ranch Sorting competition. Ranch Sorting is similar to team penning, but it is much more closely associated with the way that cowboys work in real life. It does not require as much space and, as one of the contestants put it, Ranch Sorting is easier on the cattle because it does not have the “ram and jam” of team penning.

Ranch Sorting is an event that the whole family can participate in. In Ranch Sorting, there is a system similar to the skill level handicapping found in team roping associations, which allowed 5-year-old Ethan Kremer from Bayfield, Color., not only to compete but to do very well.

Draft horses are always a featured attraction at the Four States Agricultural Expo. This year they ranged in size at the Expo from a large team of six Belgian mares down to the smallest draft team of Sampson and Lolly, two miniature horses from New Mexico. The draft teams were available outside for Expo patrons to interact with and once a day they were hitched up for a draft horse parade that went through the fairgrounds.

There were also plenty of displays of mechanized horse power ranging in size from tractors that would fit nicely in a backyard to full size combines. Besides the latest and greatest equipment from Kubota, Cat and Case, there was also a very nice display of antique tractors.

Sheep raising is very prevalent in the southwest and the Four States Agricultural Expo had renowned trainer Jack Knox presenting stock dog training clinics each day during the four day run of the Expo.

Recently, a number of factors have combined to raise the problem of unwanted horses to new levels. Horse trainer Jason Patrick of the Whispering Willows Ranch in Colorado, is working with horse rescue organizations across the country to put on horse starting clinics. At the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Patrick joined with the Four Corners, Fresh Start, and Spring Creek Horse Rescues to present a colt starting clinic each day.

At 28 the Four States Agricultural Expo is just getting started. Over the years it has changed and adapted to the agricultural needs of the farmers and ranchers of the area. It gets bigger and better every year and 2011 is expected to be even better.

There was still snow on the ground and a little windy and cool, but there was plenty of sunshine and the thousands of visitors to the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Colo., did not seem to mind the weather. For 28 years, local farmers and ranchers from the Four Corners Region of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah have come to Cortez to get the latest information on agricultural techniques, equipment, products and services.

The format of the Four States Agricultural Expo is centered around education with seminars, clinics and demonstrations. There is plenty of youth participation from 4-H and FFA groups. In 2008 the Ag Expo decided to increase the participation of equine clinics, presenters, and events and this year a very popular bull sale was added.

The Four States Agricultural Expo bills itself as the “Largest Farm and Ranch Show in the West” and it certainly lived up to its billing. There were plenty of exhibitors and presentations inside the large Main Pavilion and there were draft horse parades, team sorting contests, farm equipment demonstrations, pony rides and food vendors outside.

One of the most popular events was the Ranch Sorting competition. Ranch Sorting is similar to team penning, but it is much more closely associated with the way that cowboys work in real life. It does not require as much space and, as one of the contestants put it, Ranch Sorting is easier on the cattle because it does not have the “ram and jam” of team penning.

Ranch Sorting is an event that the whole family can participate in. In Ranch Sorting, there is a system similar to the skill level handicapping found in team roping associations, which allowed 5-year-old Ethan Kremer from Bayfield, Color., not only to compete but to do very well.

Draft horses are always a featured attraction at the Four States Agricultural Expo. This year they ranged in size at the Expo from a large team of six Belgian mares down to the smallest draft team of Sampson and Lolly, two miniature horses from New Mexico. The draft teams were available outside for Expo patrons to interact with and once a day they were hitched up for a draft horse parade that went through the fairgrounds.

There were also plenty of displays of mechanized horse power ranging in size from tractors that would fit nicely in a backyard to full size combines. Besides the latest and greatest equipment from Kubota, Cat and Case, there was also a very nice display of antique tractors.

Sheep raising is very prevalent in the southwest and the Four States Agricultural Expo had renowned trainer Jack Knox presenting stock dog training clinics each day during the four day run of the Expo.

Recently, a number of factors have combined to raise the problem of unwanted horses to new levels. Horse trainer Jason Patrick of the Whispering Willows Ranch in Colorado, is working with horse rescue organizations across the country to put on horse starting clinics. At the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Patrick joined with the Four Corners, Fresh Start, and Spring Creek Horse Rescues to present a colt starting clinic each day.

At 28 the Four States Agricultural Expo is just getting started. Over the years it has changed and adapted to the agricultural needs of the farmers and ranchers of the area. It gets bigger and better every year and 2011 is expected to be even better.

There was still snow on the ground and a little windy and cool, but there was plenty of sunshine and the thousands of visitors to the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Colo., did not seem to mind the weather. For 28 years, local farmers and ranchers from the Four Corners Region of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah have come to Cortez to get the latest information on agricultural techniques, equipment, products and services.

The format of the Four States Agricultural Expo is centered around education with seminars, clinics and demonstrations. There is plenty of youth participation from 4-H and FFA groups. In 2008 the Ag Expo decided to increase the participation of equine clinics, presenters, and events and this year a very popular bull sale was added.

The Four States Agricultural Expo bills itself as the “Largest Farm and Ranch Show in the West” and it certainly lived up to its billing. There were plenty of exhibitors and presentations inside the large Main Pavilion and there were draft horse parades, team sorting contests, farm equipment demonstrations, pony rides and food vendors outside.

One of the most popular events was the Ranch Sorting competition. Ranch Sorting is similar to team penning, but it is much more closely associated with the way that cowboys work in real life. It does not require as much space and, as one of the contestants put it, Ranch Sorting is easier on the cattle because it does not have the “ram and jam” of team penning.

Ranch Sorting is an event that the whole family can participate in. In Ranch Sorting, there is a system similar to the skill level handicapping found in team roping associations, which allowed 5-year-old Ethan Kremer from Bayfield, Color., not only to compete but to do very well.

Draft horses are always a featured attraction at the Four States Agricultural Expo. This year they ranged in size at the Expo from a large team of six Belgian mares down to the smallest draft team of Sampson and Lolly, two miniature horses from New Mexico. The draft teams were available outside for Expo patrons to interact with and once a day they were hitched up for a draft horse parade that went through the fairgrounds.

There were also plenty of displays of mechanized horse power ranging in size from tractors that would fit nicely in a backyard to full size combines. Besides the latest and greatest equipment from Kubota, Cat and Case, there was also a very nice display of antique tractors.

Sheep raising is very prevalent in the southwest and the Four States Agricultural Expo had renowned trainer Jack Knox presenting stock dog training clinics each day during the four day run of the Expo.

Recently, a number of factors have combined to raise the problem of unwanted horses to new levels. Horse trainer Jason Patrick of the Whispering Willows Ranch in Colorado, is working with horse rescue organizations across the country to put on horse starting clinics. At the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Patrick joined with the Four Corners, Fresh Start, and Spring Creek Horse Rescues to present a colt starting clinic each day.

At 28 the Four States Agricultural Expo is just getting started. Over the years it has changed and adapted to the agricultural needs of the farmers and ranchers of the area. It gets bigger and better every year and 2011 is expected to be even better.

There was still snow on the ground and a little windy and cool, but there was plenty of sunshine and the thousands of visitors to the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Colo., did not seem to mind the weather. For 28 years, local farmers and ranchers from the Four Corners Region of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah have come to Cortez to get the latest information on agricultural techniques, equipment, products and services.

The format of the Four States Agricultural Expo is centered around education with seminars, clinics and demonstrations. There is plenty of youth participation from 4-H and FFA groups. In 2008 the Ag Expo decided to increase the participation of equine clinics, presenters, and events and this year a very popular bull sale was added.

The Four States Agricultural Expo bills itself as the “Largest Farm and Ranch Show in the West” and it certainly lived up to its billing. There were plenty of exhibitors and presentations inside the large Main Pavilion and there were draft horse parades, team sorting contests, farm equipment demonstrations, pony rides and food vendors outside.

One of the most popular events was the Ranch Sorting competition. Ranch Sorting is similar to team penning, but it is much more closely associated with the way that cowboys work in real life. It does not require as much space and, as one of the contestants put it, Ranch Sorting is easier on the cattle because it does not have the “ram and jam” of team penning.

Ranch Sorting is an event that the whole family can participate in. In Ranch Sorting, there is a system similar to the skill level handicapping found in team roping associations, which allowed 5-year-old Ethan Kremer from Bayfield, Color., not only to compete but to do very well.

Draft horses are always a featured attraction at the Four States Agricultural Expo. This year they ranged in size at the Expo from a large team of six Belgian mares down to the smallest draft team of Sampson and Lolly, two miniature horses from New Mexico. The draft teams were available outside for Expo patrons to interact with and once a day they were hitched up for a draft horse parade that went through the fairgrounds.

There were also plenty of displays of mechanized horse power ranging in size from tractors that would fit nicely in a backyard to full size combines. Besides the latest and greatest equipment from Kubota, Cat and Case, there was also a very nice display of antique tractors.

Sheep raising is very prevalent in the southwest and the Four States Agricultural Expo had renowned trainer Jack Knox presenting stock dog training clinics each day during the four day run of the Expo.

Recently, a number of factors have combined to raise the problem of unwanted horses to new levels. Horse trainer Jason Patrick of the Whispering Willows Ranch in Colorado, is working with horse rescue organizations across the country to put on horse starting clinics. At the Four States Agricultural Expo in Cortez, Patrick joined with the Four Corners, Fresh Start, and Spring Creek Horse Rescues to present a colt starting clinic each day.

At 28 the Four States Agricultural Expo is just getting started. Over the years it has changed and adapted to the agricultural needs of the farmers and ranchers of the area. It gets bigger and better every year and 2011 is expected to be even better.