Farm Renovation Is Colorful Project | TheFencePost.com

Farm Renovation Is Colorful Project

Bernadine Hughes
Neligh, Neb.

Evie Barta returned to the family farm south of Lynch, Neb., in 2002. She began to renovate the land and the buildings that eventually have become a tourist attraction.

“I’m going to finish my tomorrow’s where I started my yesterday’s 64 years ago.”

This is the motto of Evie Barta of rural Lynch, Neb., and with her quick wit, enthusiasm and determination she is well on her way to making her motto become a reality.

In 2002 Evie Barta returned to the farm south of Lynch, Neb., where she grew up.

“My father died in 1992,” she said. “Mother moved to town and the farm was rented. When my mother died in 2001 it didn’t take me long to make the decision to return home.”

Barta has always had a love for animals, and the first thing she did was buy a gosling, which she named Daisy, only to find out later that Daisy was a gander. However, it is still Daisy.

Then the work began, “I knew how to run a chain saw,” she said, “and I took out approximately 500 trees.”

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The next step was to paint the buildings, so she started looking at paint samples.

“I don’t know what possessed me to chose colors that clash,” she said with a grin. “I just knew I didn’t want the basic cornhusker red and white.”

Barta admits to being an Oklahoma fan ‘to the bone,’ as she puts it. And it is very evident. She wears Sooner shirts, caps, jackets, and has signs everywhere announcing her dedication to the Sooners.

“When I told my cousin, a professor at UNO, I was going to paint my barn pink because it is combination of red and white, she said she’d like purple. I started on the east side of the barn with purple. and noticed the doors resembled closed eyes, so added eyelashes, eyebrows, (which are made out of plumber’s tape,) and a smile. I thought, ‘why not paint all the buildings a different color’.”

The house is a combination of all colors. Barta used approximately 65 gallons of primer and about that much paint on the house and buildings. She bought a $17 paint brush and has used the same brush to paint all the buildings: That brush hangs on her kitchen wall. She began painting the buildings Aug. 26, 2002, and all of the buildings, with the exception of the corn crib, were painted by October 3rd.

The bird population has increased immensely since the day she bought Daisy. There are now 28 geese, six breeds of exotic chickens has been added, as well as 50 guineas, five Indian Runner ducks, plus four cats named Mike, Ben, Bruce and Alice, and all roam freely on the farm. A riding mule has been ordered, and plans are to add mallards and put cooing doves in the outhouse. Some of the birds have been given to her and others she purchased at bird sales. Recently two peacocks have been added to the collection.

Visitors sign the bright pink brooder house with a magic marker, which is kept in the rain gutter.

Since Barta began her restoration the farm has been visited by 24 states and two foreign countries, France and England.

The farm was purchased by her grandfather in 1919 for $8,000.

The grandparents lived on the farm until 1949 when they bought a business in Lynch, and her father took over the farm.

Barta went to country school, high school at Lynch and graduated in 1965. After graduation she worked at Bell Telephone Company in O’Neill several years, then in retail in O’Neill, Grand Island and Norfolk.

“I was working 80 hours a week,” she said, “and when my mother died I said, ‘I’m going home’.”

Barta rents out the farmland and is a wrangler at Niobrara State Park during the summer, taking visitors on two mile trail rides.

“The corn crib is my next project,” she mused, “and it is going to be a horrid turquoise and ugly green, complete with my motto, ‘I’m going to finish my tomorrow’s where I started my yesterday’s 64 years ago.’

“Somewhere, maybe next to my motto, I may paint Evie’s Queendom,” she added. “If men can have a kingdom I ought to be able to have a queendom.”

“I’m going to finish my tomorrow’s where I started my yesterday’s 64 years ago.”

This is the motto of Evie Barta of rural Lynch, Neb., and with her quick wit, enthusiasm and determination she is well on her way to making her motto become a reality.

In 2002 Evie Barta returned to the farm south of Lynch, Neb., where she grew up.

“My father died in 1992,” she said. “Mother moved to town and the farm was rented. When my mother died in 2001 it didn’t take me long to make the decision to return home.”

Barta has always had a love for animals, and the first thing she did was buy a gosling, which she named Daisy, only to find out later that Daisy was a gander. However, it is still Daisy.

Then the work began, “I knew how to run a chain saw,” she said, “and I took out approximately 500 trees.”

The next step was to paint the buildings, so she started looking at paint samples.

“I don’t know what possessed me to chose colors that clash,” she said with a grin. “I just knew I didn’t want the basic cornhusker red and white.”

Barta admits to being an Oklahoma fan ‘to the bone,’ as she puts it. And it is very evident. She wears Sooner shirts, caps, jackets, and has signs everywhere announcing her dedication to the Sooners.

“When I told my cousin, a professor at UNO, I was going to paint my barn pink because it is combination of red and white, she said she’d like purple. I started on the east side of the barn with purple. and noticed the doors resembled closed eyes, so added eyelashes, eyebrows, (which are made out of plumber’s tape,) and a smile. I thought, ‘why not paint all the buildings a different color’.”

The house is a combination of all colors. Barta used approximately 65 gallons of primer and about that much paint on the house and buildings. She bought a $17 paint brush and has used the same brush to paint all the buildings: That brush hangs on her kitchen wall. She began painting the buildings Aug. 26, 2002, and all of the buildings, with the exception of the corn crib, were painted by October 3rd.

The bird population has increased immensely since the day she bought Daisy. There are now 28 geese, six breeds of exotic chickens has been added, as well as 50 guineas, five Indian Runner ducks, plus four cats named Mike, Ben, Bruce and Alice, and all roam freely on the farm. A riding mule has been ordered, and plans are to add mallards and put cooing doves in the outhouse. Some of the birds have been given to her and others she purchased at bird sales. Recently two peacocks have been added to the collection.

Visitors sign the bright pink brooder house with a magic marker, which is kept in the rain gutter.

Since Barta began her restoration the farm has been visited by 24 states and two foreign countries, France and England.

The farm was purchased by her grandfather in 1919 for $8,000.

The grandparents lived on the farm until 1949 when they bought a business in Lynch, and her father took over the farm.

Barta went to country school, high school at Lynch and graduated in 1965. After graduation she worked at Bell Telephone Company in O’Neill several years, then in retail in O’Neill, Grand Island and Norfolk.

“I was working 80 hours a week,” she said, “and when my mother died I said, ‘I’m going home’.”

Barta rents out the farmland and is a wrangler at Niobrara State Park during the summer, taking visitors on two mile trail rides.

“The corn crib is my next project,” she mused, “and it is going to be a horrid turquoise and ugly green, complete with my motto, ‘I’m going to finish my tomorrow’s where I started my yesterday’s 64 years ago.’

“Somewhere, maybe next to my motto, I may paint Evie’s Queendom,” she added. “If men can have a kingdom I ought to be able to have a queendom.”

“I’m going to finish my tomorrow’s where I started my yesterday’s 64 years ago.”

This is the motto of Evie Barta of rural Lynch, Neb., and with her quick wit, enthusiasm and determination she is well on her way to making her motto become a reality.

In 2002 Evie Barta returned to the farm south of Lynch, Neb., where she grew up.

“My father died in 1992,” she said. “Mother moved to town and the farm was rented. When my mother died in 2001 it didn’t take me long to make the decision to return home.”

Barta has always had a love for animals, and the first thing she did was buy a gosling, which she named Daisy, only to find out later that Daisy was a gander. However, it is still Daisy.

Then the work began, “I knew how to run a chain saw,” she said, “and I took out approximately 500 trees.”

The next step was to paint the buildings, so she started looking at paint samples.

“I don’t know what possessed me to chose colors that clash,” she said with a grin. “I just knew I didn’t want the basic cornhusker red and white.”

Barta admits to being an Oklahoma fan ‘to the bone,’ as she puts it. And it is very evident. She wears Sooner shirts, caps, jackets, and has signs everywhere announcing her dedication to the Sooners.

“When I told my cousin, a professor at UNO, I was going to paint my barn pink because it is combination of red and white, she said she’d like purple. I started on the east side of the barn with purple. and noticed the doors resembled closed eyes, so added eyelashes, eyebrows, (which are made out of plumber’s tape,) and a smile. I thought, ‘why not paint all the buildings a different color’.”

The house is a combination of all colors. Barta used approximately 65 gallons of primer and about that much paint on the house and buildings. She bought a $17 paint brush and has used the same brush to paint all the buildings: That brush hangs on her kitchen wall. She began painting the buildings Aug. 26, 2002, and all of the buildings, with the exception of the corn crib, were painted by October 3rd.

The bird population has increased immensely since the day she bought Daisy. There are now 28 geese, six breeds of exotic chickens has been added, as well as 50 guineas, five Indian Runner ducks, plus four cats named Mike, Ben, Bruce and Alice, and all roam freely on the farm. A riding mule has been ordered, and plans are to add mallards and put cooing doves in the outhouse. Some of the birds have been given to her and others she purchased at bird sales. Recently two peacocks have been added to the collection.

Visitors sign the bright pink brooder house with a magic marker, which is kept in the rain gutter.

Since Barta began her restoration the farm has been visited by 24 states and two foreign countries, France and England.

The farm was purchased by her grandfather in 1919 for $8,000.

The grandparents lived on the farm until 1949 when they bought a business in Lynch, and her father took over the farm.

Barta went to country school, high school at Lynch and graduated in 1965. After graduation she worked at Bell Telephone Company in O’Neill several years, then in retail in O’Neill, Grand Island and Norfolk.

“I was working 80 hours a week,” she said, “and when my mother died I said, ‘I’m going home’.”

Barta rents out the farmland and is a wrangler at Niobrara State Park during the summer, taking visitors on two mile trail rides.

“The corn crib is my next project,” she mused, “and it is going to be a horrid turquoise and ugly green, complete with my motto, ‘I’m going to finish my tomorrow’s where I started my yesterday’s 64 years ago.’

“Somewhere, maybe next to my motto, I may paint Evie’s Queendom,” she added. “If men can have a kingdom I ought to be able to have a queendom.”

“I’m going to finish my tomorrow’s where I started my yesterday’s 64 years ago.”

This is the motto of Evie Barta of rural Lynch, Neb., and with her quick wit, enthusiasm and determination she is well on her way to making her motto become a reality.

In 2002 Evie Barta returned to the farm south of Lynch, Neb., where she grew up.

“My father died in 1992,” she said. “Mother moved to town and the farm was rented. When my mother died in 2001 it didn’t take me long to make the decision to return home.”

Barta has always had a love for animals, and the first thing she did was buy a gosling, which she named Daisy, only to find out later that Daisy was a gander. However, it is still Daisy.

Then the work began, “I knew how to run a chain saw,” she said, “and I took out approximately 500 trees.”

The next step was to paint the buildings, so she started looking at paint samples.

“I don’t know what possessed me to chose colors that clash,” she said with a grin. “I just knew I didn’t want the basic cornhusker red and white.”

Barta admits to being an Oklahoma fan ‘to the bone,’ as she puts it. And it is very evident. She wears Sooner shirts, caps, jackets, and has signs everywhere announcing her dedication to the Sooners.

“When I told my cousin, a professor at UNO, I was going to paint my barn pink because it is combination of red and white, she said she’d like purple. I started on the east side of the barn with purple. and noticed the doors resembled closed eyes, so added eyelashes, eyebrows, (which are made out of plumber’s tape,) and a smile. I thought, ‘why not paint all the buildings a different color’.”

The house is a combination of all colors. Barta used approximately 65 gallons of primer and about that much paint on the house and buildings. She bought a $17 paint brush and has used the same brush to paint all the buildings: That brush hangs on her kitchen wall. She began painting the buildings Aug. 26, 2002, and all of the buildings, with the exception of the corn crib, were painted by October 3rd.

The bird population has increased immensely since the day she bought Daisy. There are now 28 geese, six breeds of exotic chickens has been added, as well as 50 guineas, five Indian Runner ducks, plus four cats named Mike, Ben, Bruce and Alice, and all roam freely on the farm. A riding mule has been ordered, and plans are to add mallards and put cooing doves in the outhouse. Some of the birds have been given to her and others she purchased at bird sales. Recently two peacocks have been added to the collection.

Visitors sign the bright pink brooder house with a magic marker, which is kept in the rain gutter.

Since Barta began her restoration the farm has been visited by 24 states and two foreign countries, France and England.

The farm was purchased by her grandfather in 1919 for $8,000.

The grandparents lived on the farm until 1949 when they bought a business in Lynch, and her father took over the farm.

Barta went to country school, high school at Lynch and graduated in 1965. After graduation she worked at Bell Telephone Company in O’Neill several years, then in retail in O’Neill, Grand Island and Norfolk.

“I was working 80 hours a week,” she said, “and when my mother died I said, ‘I’m going home’.”

Barta rents out the farmland and is a wrangler at Niobrara State Park during the summer, taking visitors on two mile trail rides.

“The corn crib is my next project,” she mused, “and it is going to be a horrid turquoise and ugly green, complete with my motto, ‘I’m going to finish my tomorrow’s where I started my yesterday’s 64 years ago.’

“Somewhere, maybe next to my motto, I may paint Evie’s Queendom,” she added. “If men can have a kingdom I ought to be able to have a queendom.”