Finley’s crafted buildings are a unique work of art | TheFencePost.com

Finley’s crafted buildings are a unique work of art

Fred Hendricks
Bucyrus, Ohio

Skip Finley built this well-crafted 1" scale timber framed barn. The features include: standing seam metal roof, rain gutters, sliding barn doors, stone foundation with blocks cut from rocks found in the original barn and the icon Mail Pouch Tobacco advertisement. Also shown is the intricately crafted interior of the White Finley Barn. The joints are mortise and tenon and secured with square hickory pegs. The upper portions of the support beams are angled away from the center. This allowed clearance when hay or straw was brought into the barn via rope slings and transported with the trolley suspended from the track in the ridge.

A builder’s passion for historic preservation turns into an art form. While a builder by trade, Lowell “Skip” Finley is not your ordinary builder. He appreciates the artistic form of construction that went into barns of yesteryear. “I was working on an old barn one day and noted the intricate techniques used in making that building. I had built a replica of our family’s log house. I began to contemplate whether I could build a barn using those same techniques in miniature form. I examined the structure more closely and began taking measurements. After hundreds of hours, I completed a scale model barn,” Skip reflected.

Skip Finley grew up in a family of 16 children just south of Mansfield, Ohio. Their home was a modest two-room log house, one room on the first floor and one room on the second floor. His father worked diligently as a carpenter while his mother cared for the children and tended to the household chores. “My dad was a hard worker. He provided for our family in that very modest house. I have many fond memories growing up there. And, that is why I wanted to build a scale replica of the house,” Skip stated.

A builder’s passion for historic preservation turns into an art form. While a builder by trade, Lowell “Skip” Finley is not your ordinary builder. He appreciates the artistic form of construction that went into barns of yesteryear. “I was working on an old barn one day and noted the intricate techniques used in making that building. I had built a replica of our family’s log house. I began to contemplate whether I could build a barn using those same techniques in miniature form. I examined the structure more closely and began taking measurements. After hundreds of hours, I completed a scale model barn,” Skip reflected.

Skip Finley grew up in a family of 16 children just south of Mansfield, Ohio. Their home was a modest two-room log house, one room on the first floor and one room on the second floor. His father worked diligently as a carpenter while his mother cared for the children and tended to the household chores. “My dad was a hard worker. He provided for our family in that very modest house. I have many fond memories growing up there. And, that is why I wanted to build a scale replica of the house,” Skip stated.

A builder’s passion for historic preservation turns into an art form. While a builder by trade, Lowell “Skip” Finley is not your ordinary builder. He appreciates the artistic form of construction that went into barns of yesteryear. “I was working on an old barn one day and noted the intricate techniques used in making that building. I had built a replica of our family’s log house. I began to contemplate whether I could build a barn using those same techniques in miniature form. I examined the structure more closely and began taking measurements. After hundreds of hours, I completed a scale model barn,” Skip reflected.

Skip Finley grew up in a family of 16 children just south of Mansfield, Ohio. Their home was a modest two-room log house, one room on the first floor and one room on the second floor. His father worked diligently as a carpenter while his mother cared for the children and tended to the household chores. “My dad was a hard worker. He provided for our family in that very modest house. I have many fond memories growing up there. And, that is why I wanted to build a scale replica of the house,” Skip stated.

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A builder’s passion for historic preservation turns into an art form. While a builder by trade, Lowell “Skip” Finley is not your ordinary builder. He appreciates the artistic form of construction that went into barns of yesteryear. “I was working on an old barn one day and noted the intricate techniques used in making that building. I had built a replica of our family’s log house. I began to contemplate whether I could build a barn using those same techniques in miniature form. I examined the structure more closely and began taking measurements. After hundreds of hours, I completed a scale model barn,” Skip reflected.

Skip Finley grew up in a family of 16 children just south of Mansfield, Ohio. Their home was a modest two-room log house, one room on the first floor and one room on the second floor. His father worked diligently as a carpenter while his mother cared for the children and tended to the household chores. “My dad was a hard worker. He provided for our family in that very modest house. I have many fond memories growing up there. And, that is why I wanted to build a scale replica of the house,” Skip stated.

A builder’s passion for historic preservation turns into an art form. While a builder by trade, Lowell “Skip” Finley is not your ordinary builder. He appreciates the artistic form of construction that went into barns of yesteryear. “I was working on an old barn one day and noted the intricate techniques used in making that building. I had built a replica of our family’s log house. I began to contemplate whether I could build a barn using those same techniques in miniature form. I examined the structure more closely and began taking measurements. After hundreds of hours, I completed a scale model barn,” Skip reflected.

Skip Finley grew up in a family of 16 children just south of Mansfield, Ohio. Their home was a modest two-room log house, one room on the first floor and one room on the second floor. His father worked diligently as a carpenter while his mother cared for the children and tended to the household chores. “My dad was a hard worker. He provided for our family in that very modest house. I have many fond memories growing up there. And, that is why I wanted to build a scale replica of the house,” Skip stated.